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In Hebrews 10:10, it says we are ἁγιάζω (hagiazō) through the offering of the body of Christ. Hagiazō here is ussually translated as holy, but holy is ἁγίας (hagias).

From here I find ἁγιάζω is from ἅγιος (hágios, “holy”) +‎ -άζω (-ázō, denominative verb suffix). Where -ᾰ́ζω • (-ázō) is used to form verbs from nouns, adjectives, and other verbs, or added to verb stems to create a frequentative form.

This is the part I need help with, what does -ázō added to the word holy mean? Certainly this changes the meaning and understanding, possibly meaning consecration or sanctification?

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  • You have already answered your own question: -azo is a verbal suffix, meant to transform other types of words into verbs. In this case, from holy we have to hollow, whose participle is hollowed, which is what is actually present in the text, in its masculine plural nominative form. – Lucian Sep 25 at 0:04
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    @Lucian I think you meant 'hallow' and 'hallowed' not 'hollow' and 'hollowed'. – Nigel J Sep 25 at 5:31
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    As @Lucian points out, you have answered your own question. You are looking at the verb form 'make holy' of the adjective 'holy'. Or, one can say 'sanctify' instead of 'make holy'. The word (generally speaking) is a matter of 'setting apart'. There is another word in Greek which is like the English word 'cathartic' which Greek word means 'purge' or 'purify' You might want to look at that word as well in your own studies of scripture. – Nigel J Sep 25 at 5:33
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In Greek, the stem carries the meaning and the suffix is usually the part of speech. In the example you quote we have:

  • ἁγιάζω (hagiazó) is the verb meaning to hallow, sanctify, make holy etc. That is, set apart for a special purpose
  • ἁγιασμός (hagiasmos) is a noun meaning the effect of consecration: sanctification of heart and life
  • ἅγιον (hagion) is a noun meaning properly reverend, worthy of veneration, holy [place], and, being set apart for a special purpose and usually used to denote the sanctuary itself
  • ἅγιος (hagios) is an adjective meaning holy, sacred, set apart for a special purpose

Thus, the verb ἁγιάζω (hagiazó) in Heb 10:10 simply means that Christ's sacrifice has set us apart and made us holy, dedicated to Christ for His service. Indeed, in 1 peter 1:15, 16 we are told to be holy because God is holy.

But just as He who called you is holy, so be holy in all you do, for it is written: “Be holy, because I am holy.” (quoting Lev 11:44, 45)

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As to 'holy' or 'consecrated' I would say yes, both.

Both holiness (being set apart) and consecration (being dedicated to a purpose) are expressed in the New Testament writings in different words, under different headings of doctrine.

Redemption is a matter of acquirement, of separation and of total dedication.


As @Lucian points out, you have answered your own Greek question. You are looking at the verb form 'make holy' of the adjective 'holy'. Or, one can say 'sanctify' instead of 'make holy'.

And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly; and I pray God your whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. [I Thessalonians 5:23 KJV] (ἁγιάσαι)

The word (generally speaking) is a matter of 'setting apart'. There is another word in Greek which is like the English word 'cathartic' which Greek word means 'purge' or 'purify' You might want to look at that word as well in your own studies of scripture.

καθαρᾶς Strong 2513 - Biblehub

Now the end of the commandment is charity out of a pure heart [1 Timothy 1:5 KJV] (καθαρᾶς)

Holiness is a matter of the Holy Spirit. When one is justified (by faith) one receives the Holy Spirit. It is his presence (within the born again soul) which is holiness. It is through faith, not works. And it is a result of redemption, which is a matter of blood-shedding.

whom he called, them he also justified: and whom he justified, them he also glorified. [Romans 8:30 KJV]

And almost all things are by the law purged with blood; and without shedding of blood is no remission. [Hebrews 9:22 KJV] (καθαρίζεται)

So I would agree with you : through redemption, by justification, and consequent upon regeneration, one receives holiness.

... but ye are washed, but ye are sanctified, but ye are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of our God. [1 Corinthians 6:11 KJV]

Those who are recipients of these gifts are baptised in the name of the Father and in the name of the Son and in the name of the Holy Spirit for these, all, are responsible for this wondrous work of salvation.

Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: [Matthew 28:19 KJV]

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