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As I read through (Deuteronomy 17:14-16) in different bible translations, I, personally, do Not notice any kind of cynicism when God specifies the stipulations and conditions when Israel chooses a King when they possess the promised land. Furthermore, from my perspective, the (Deuteronomy 17:14-16) verses seemed as if God were speaking in a monotonous instructive tone.
It's Only later on the Bible, when I read the (1 Samuel 8:5-20) verses that I noticed that God Himself was upset that Israel asked for a king. I do Not know Hebrew. Therefore, I'm just wondering if the original Hebrew translation of (Deuteronomy 17:14-16) suggests/hints that God was cynical about Israel's selfish desires for a King? Therefore, could someone please read and review the corresponding Hebrew translations(posted below) of (Deuteronomy 17:14-16), and respond as to whether the corresponding (Deuteronomy 17:14-16) Hebrew verses have any sort of negative cynical tone or gist to idea of the Israelites appointing an earthly King?

Deuteronomy 17:14-16 New American Standard Bible

14 “When you enter the land which the Lord your God gives you, and you possess it and live in it, and you say, ‘I will set a king over me like all the nations who are around me,’ 15 you shall surely set a king over you whom the Lord your God chooses, one from among your [a]countrymen you shall set as king over yourselves; you may not put a foreigner over yourselves who is not your [b]countryman. 16 Moreover, he shall not multiply horses for himself, nor shall he cause the people to return to Egypt to multiply horses, since the Lord has said to you, ‘You shall never again return that way.’

1 Samuel 8:5-20 New American Standard Bible

5 and they said to him, “Behold, you have grown old, and your sons do not walk in your ways. Now appoint a king for us to judge us like all the nations.” 6 But the thing was [a]displeasing in the sight of Samuel when they said, “Give us a king to judge us.” And Samuel prayed to the Lord. 7 The Lord said to Samuel, “Listen to the voice of the people in regard to all that they say to you, for they have not rejected you, but they have rejected Me from being king over them. 8 Like all the deeds which they have done since the day that I brought them up from Egypt even to this day—in that they have forsaken Me and served other gods—so they are doing to you also. 9 Now then, listen to their voice; however, you shall solemnly [b]warn them and tell them of the [c]procedure of the king who will reign over them.”

Deuteronomy 17:14-16 King James Version

14 When thou art come unto the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee, and shalt possess it, and shalt dwell therein, and shalt say, I will set a king over me, like as all the nations that are about me; 15 Thou shalt in any wise set him king over thee, whom the Lord thy God shall choose: one from among thy brethren shalt thou set king over thee: thou mayest not set a stranger over thee, which is not thy brother. 16 But he shall not multiply horses to himself, nor cause the people to return to Egypt, to the end that he should multiply horses: forasmuch as the Lord hath said unto you, Ye shall henceforth return no more that way.

1 Samuel 8:5-20 King James Version

5 And said unto him, Behold, thou art old, and thy sons walk not in thy ways: now make us a king to judge us like all the nations. 6 But the thing displeased Samuel, when they said, Give us a king to judge us. And Samuel prayed unto the Lord. 7 And the Lord said unto Samuel, Hearken unto the voice of the people in all that they say unto thee: for they have not rejected thee, but they have rejected me, that I should not reign over them. 8 According to all the works which they have done since the day that I brought them up out of Egypt even unto this day, wherewith they have forsaken me, and served other gods, so do they also unto thee. 9 Now therefore hearken unto their voice: howbeit yet protest solemnly unto them, and shew them the manner of the king that shall reign over them.

Westminster Leningrad Codex כִּֽי־תָבֹ֣א אֶל־הָאָ֗רֶץ אֲשֶׁ֨ר יְהוָ֤ה אֱלֹהֶ֙יךָ֙ נֹתֵ֣ן לָ֔ךְ וִֽירִשְׁתָּ֖הּ וְיָשַׁ֣בְתָּה בָּ֑הּ וְאָמַרְתָּ֗ אָשִׂ֤ימָה עָלַי֙ מֶ֔לֶךְ כְּכָל־הַגֹּויִ֖ם אֲשֶׁ֥ר סְבִיבֹתָֽי׃ שֹׂ֣ום תָּשִׂ֤ים עָלֶ֙יךָ֙ מֶ֔לֶךְ אֲשֶׁ֥ר יִבְחַ֛ר יְהוָ֥ה אֱלֹהֶ֖יךָ בֹּ֑ו מִקֶּ֣רֶב אַחֶ֗יךָ תָּשִׂ֤ים עָלֶ֙יךָ֙ מֶ֔לֶךְ לֹ֣א תוּכַ֗ל לָתֵ֤ת עָלֶ֙יךָ֙ אִ֣ישׁ נָכְרִ֔י אֲשֶׁ֥ר לֹֽא־אָחִ֖יךָ הֽוּא׃

Aleppo Codex יד כי תבא אל הארץ אשר יהוה אלהיך נתן לך וירשתה וישבתה בה ואמרת אשימה עלי מלך ככל הגוים אשר סביבתי טו שום תשים עליך מלך אשר יבחר יהוה אלהיך בו מקרב אחיך תשים עליך מלך--לא תוכל לתת עליך איש נכרי אשר לא אחיך הוא

Therefore, I'm just wondering if the original Hebrew translation of (Deuteronomy 17:14-16) suggests/hints that God was cynical about Israel's selfish desires for a King? Therefore, could someone please read and review the corresponding Hebrew translations(posted above) of (Deuteronomy 17:14-16), and respond as to whether the corresponding (Deuteronomy 17:14-16) Hebrew verses have any sort of negative cynical tone or gist to idea of the Israelites appointing an earthly King?

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First of all, we can say that the verbal form, really a prophetic sentence - utilized in Deu 17:14 – (אשׂימה) doesn’t include a veiled request to God for a concession from His part. In fact, this verbal form must be translated (according the context) anyway with an imperative nuance, with an expression which enhances the determination of the Israelites to have a king, ‘We will put a king over us…’. Consequently, the following kinds of wording are erroneous: “Let me set a [king]…”, TS2009; “let me set over me a [king]…”, Young, or alike.

Granted, they formally ask God – through Samuel (1 Sam 12:17) – for a king. But, their definitive decision was yet taken. In fact, in 1 Sam 8:5 there’s no shred of some respectful request for a concession, but an imperative command, שׂימה, ‘Establish [a king for us]!

And, even after Samuel prove them God’s displeasure about their decision with a miracle (1 Sam 12:16-18), and even after their own admission of transgression (12:19), they do not rethink the matter, at all.

Second, the reason that drove the Israelites to put a king over them was wrong, altogether: they decide to do so simply to mimic the nations around them (Deu 17:14 & 1 Sam 8:5).

Then, though we cannot indicate some specific cynical-tone-possessed Hebrew terms in the prophetic God’s sentences in Deu 17:14-16, me may conclude that God was not agree with the decision of Israelites. Their decision – to have a king - was comparable to a ‘rejection of God’ (1 Sam 8:7). From His part, Lord יהוה gave them – until Saul – all they have need to grow as a strong and godly nation, under His wings. You yourself are speaking about the Israelites’ “selfish desires for a King”.

Final 'point to point' (a Bible word pun): The Israelites שאול (ask for) a king, and God gave them exactly what they had ‘requested’, שאול (Saul) - 1 Sam 12:17.

I hope these information will be useful to you.

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cyn·i·cism
an inclination to believe that people are motivated purely by self-interest; skepticism.

Deuteronomy 31:21 And when many troubles and afflictions have come upon them, this song will testify against them, because it will not be forgotten from the lips of their descendants. For I know their inclination, even before I bring them into the land I swore to give them."

John 2:24 But Jesus would not entrust himself to them, for he knew all people.

In the general sense according to the dictionary meaning, God is always cynical toward humans because of our sinful nature and tendency to disobey Him. But in this way we are anthropomorphize God too much.

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