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Job 20:7 New American Standard Bible (NASB)

7 He perishes forever like his refuse; Those who have seen him will say, ‘Where is he?’

Job 20:7 English Standard Version (ESV)

7 he will perish forever like his own dung; those who have seen him will say, ‘Where is he?’

Job 20:7 New King James Version (NKJV)

7 Yet he will perish forever like his own refuse; Those who have seen him will say, ‘Where is he?’

Job 20:7 King James Version (KJV)

7 Yet he shall perish for ever like his own dung: they which have seen him shall say, Where is he? enter image description here

I was just curious as to whether the ancient Hebrew translation of the word "dung" or "refuse that is mentioned Job 20:7 was appropriate when the ancient Hebrew bible was written. Therefore, I searched the internet for the "Hebrew OT: Westminster Leningrad Codex" translation of Job 20:7 verse. Was the corresponding ancient Hebrew word appropriate as colloquy during the time period of the ancient Israelites? How appropriate is the ancient Hebrew translation of the word "dung" or "refuse that is mentioned Job 20:7? (LOL, is it like saying the word "s***" which is bad language nowadays? )

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The Hebrew word in question is גֵּ֫לֶל (gelel, a variation of galal) and occurs in just four places, namely, Job 20:7, Eze 4:12, 15, Zeph 1:17.

In all cases the meaning is clear, it means "dung" or excrement as per Strong's Lexicon and Brown-Driver-Briggs; [גֵּל] noun [masculine] dung.

Further, all the above references except Zeph 1:17 refer specifically to human excrement. The figure in Job 20:7 is simply that excrement vanishes (is actually consumed by various bugs) over time and that is what Job is saying about the godless person - they vanish and never return.

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    And in all four cases it's used negatively, not like fertiliser or guano. – curiousdannii Feb 9 at 0:03
  • @curiousdannii Therefore, are you saying that in terms of level of inappropriateness, saying גֵּ֫לֶל (gelel, a variation of galal) is like saying "s***" which is bad language nowadays? – crazyTech Feb 9 at 13:59
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    The problem is the ritual uncleanness which carries the overtones of some negativity. Then as now, people had to wash after coming in contact with excrement of any kind. The figure in Job 20:7 is simply that excrement vanishes (is actually consumed by various bugs) over time and that is what Job is saying about the godless person - they vanish and never return. – Dottard Feb 11 at 0:33

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