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I have read through Isaiah 52:7 time and again. I don’t seem to be coming to terms with how the feet of him that brings the good news are beautiful upon the mountains.

“How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him who brings good news, who publishes peace, who brings good news of happiness, who publishes salvation, who says to Zion, “Your God reigns.”” (Isaiah 52:7)

I see also that Galatians 6:15 also says:

“And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace.” (KJV)

So, I would like for someone to help with the the symbolic relationship between the feet, the Gospel and the mountains as used in Isaiah 52:7. In other words, what mountains is this scripture referring to?

  • I am not clear as to what you mean by 'apocalyptic connection'.The Greek word apocalupsis means 'revelation' in scripture but in English 'apocalyptic' has come to mean 'related to the end of the world', because of its association with the Book of Revelation. The two references you quote are not, to my mind, related to events at the end of time. – Nigel J Oct 6 at 16:14
  • Thank you Nigel J, I have added some clarifications by providing additional details to highlight exactly what I need. – Ernest Abinokhauno Oct 6 at 23:17
  • “In other words, what mountains is this scripture referring to?” — Was that the only question you wanted answered? If not, please re-edit your question. – Der Übermensch Oct 11 at 17:56
  • @Der Übermensch: Great thoughts! – Ernest Abinokhauno Oct 12 at 19:33
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Isaiah 52:7 appears to share text with Nahum 1:15, although Nahum does not mention the beauty of the evangelists’ feet.

Isaiah 52:7

How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace; that bringeth good tidings of good, that publisheth salvation; that saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth! KJV, ©1769

Nahum 1:15

Behold upon the mountains the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace! O Judah, keep thy solemn feasts, perform thy vows: for the wicked shall no more pass through thee; he is utterly cut off. KJV, ©1769

The mountains to which both refer are the “mountains of Israel.”1 In his commentary on Isaiah 52:7, Franz Delitzsch wrote,2

Delitsch. Biblischer Commentar über das alte Testament. Dritter Teil: prophetische Bücher. Erster Band: der Prophet Jesaia. 2nd ed. p. 527

The speech concerns Jerusalem. The mountains are, therefore, those of the holy land, and especially, in the north of Jerusalem.

Footnotes

1 Jos. 11:21; Eze. 6:2–3, 19:9, 33:29, 34:13–14, 35:12, 36:1, 36:4, 36:8, 37:22, 38:8, 39:2, 39:4, 39:17
2 Delitzsch, p. 527

References

Delitzsch, Franz. Biblischer Commentar über das alte Testament. Dritter Teil: prophetische Bücher. Erster Band: der Prophet Jesaia. 2nd ed. Leipzig: Dörffling and Franke, 1869.

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