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I have read through Isaiah 52:7 time and again. I don’t seem to be coming to terms with how the feet of him that brings the good news are beautiful upon the mountains.

“How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him who brings good news, who publishes peace, who brings good news of happiness, who publishes salvation, who says to Zion, “Your God reigns.”” (Isaiah 52:7)

I see also that Galatians 6:15 also says:

“And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace.” (KJV)

So, I would like for someone to help with the the symbolic relationship between the feet, the Gospel and the mountains as used in Isaiah 52:7. In other words, what mountains is this scripture referring to?

  • I am not clear as to what you mean by 'apocalyptic connection'.The Greek word apocalupsis means 'revelation' in scripture but in English 'apocalyptic' has come to mean 'related to the end of the world', because of its association with the Book of Revelation. The two references you quote are not, to my mind, related to events at the end of time. – Nigel J Oct 6 '19 at 16:14
  • Thank you Nigel J, I have added some clarifications by providing additional details to highlight exactly what I need. – Ernest Abinokhauno Oct 6 '19 at 23:17
  • “In other words, what mountains is this scripture referring to?” — Was that the only question you wanted answered? If not, please re-edit your question. – Der Übermensch Oct 11 '19 at 17:56
  • @Der Übermensch: Great thoughts! – Ernest Abinokhauno Oct 12 '19 at 19:33
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Isaiah 52:7 appears to share text with Nahum 1:15, although Nahum does not mention the beauty of the evangelists’ feet.

Isaiah 52:7

How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace; that bringeth good tidings of good, that publisheth salvation; that saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth! KJV, ©1769

Nahum 1:15

Behold upon the mountains the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace! O Judah, keep thy solemn feasts, perform thy vows: for the wicked shall no more pass through thee; he is utterly cut off. KJV, ©1769

The mountains to which both refer are the “mountains of Israel.”1 In his commentary on Isaiah 52:7, Franz Delitzsch wrote,2

Delitsch. Biblischer Commentar über das alte Testament. Dritter Teil: prophetische Bücher. Erster Band: der Prophet Jesaia. 2nd ed. p. 527

The speech concerns Jerusalem. The mountains are, therefore, those of the holy land, and especially, in the north of Jerusalem.

Footnotes

1 Jos. 11:21; Eze. 6:2–3, 19:9, 33:29, 34:13–14, 35:12, 36:1, 36:4, 36:8, 37:22, 38:8, 39:2, 39:4, 39:17
2 Delitzsch, p. 527

References

Delitzsch, Franz. Biblischer Commentar über das alte Testament. Dritter Teil: prophetische Bücher. Erster Band: der Prophet Jesaia. 2nd ed. Leipzig: Dörffling and Franke, 1869.

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Other translations like NET gives better understanding of the verse,

"How delightful it is to see approaching over the mountains the feet of a messenger who announces peace, a messenger who brings good news, who announces deliverance, who says to Zion, “Your God reigns!”

John gill on that verse says

Isaiah 52:7 "How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings,.... Not of the messenger that brought the news of Cyrus's proclamation of liberty to the Jews; rather of John the Baptist, the forerunner of our Lord; best of Christ himself, the messenger of the covenant, who was anointed to preach glad tidings to the meek, and by whom grace, peace, life, and salvation came; and also of the apostles of Christ, for to Gospel times are these words applied, and to more persons than one, Ro 10:15, who were not only seen "upon the mountains" of the land of Israel, as the Targum paraphrases it, where both Christ and his apostles preached, but upon the mountains of the Gentile world; and may denote the pains they took, the circuit they made, and the difficulties they had to encounter with; and the publicness of their ministrations, which lay in bringing "good tidings" of the incarnate Saviour, of God manifest in the flesh, for the word k here used has the signification of flesh in it; of good things in the heart of God for his people, in the covenant of grace, in the hands of Christ, and as come by him, and to be had from him; as pardon by his blood; justification by his righteousness; eternal life and happiness through him; and of all good things to be enjoyed now and hereafter. It may be applied to all other ministers of the Gospel in later ages, who are bringers of the same good tidings to the children of men, to whom their very feet are beautiful, and even at a distance, upon the high mountains; not to carnal men, but sensible sinners, to whom the good news of salvation by Christ is welcome. Feet are mentioned instead of their whole persons, because the instruments of motion, and so of bringing the tidings, and of running to and fro with them from place to place, and even though they are dirty and defiled with sin; for Gospel ministers are not free from it, and are men of like passions with others; yet are beautiful when their walk and ministry, conversation and doctrine, agree together; and their feet are particularly so, being shod with the preparation of the Gospel of peace. The words may with the greatest propriety, and in agreement with the context, be understood of that angel, or set of Gospel ministers in the latter day, represented as flying in the midst of the heavens, having the everlasting Gospel to preach to all nations, which will precede the fall of Babylon... "

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