4

I don't understand the meaning of Leviticus 5:4:

"Or if a soul swear, pronouncing with his lips to do evil, or to do good, whatsoever it be that a man shall pronounce with an oath, and it be hid from him; when he knoweth of it, then he shall be guilty in one of these." (KJV 5:4)

What does "and it be hid from him" mean? How can something that a man has pronounced with an oath be hid from him? I can't think of any possible case besides a man being delirious and saying things without realizing it, but, of course, it is not the case here.

  • 3
    I would say it is a matter of him realising, afterwards, the implications of his oath which he was not aware of at the time of making it. The example which springs to mind is Jephthah in Judges 11. – Nigel J Sep 11 at 4:00
  • How can it both "be hid from him"; "when he knoweth of it"? There must be a misunderstanding. – John Martin Sep 11 at 8:55
  • @JohnMartin Forgetting and then remembering? – b a Sep 11 at 8:58
  • If he took an oath, he will still be guilty, even though his being wrong was "hid from him" at the time. That could mean he showed negligence or carelessness at the time. – John Martin Sep 11 at 9:10
  • It is wise to not make rash or extreme promises...and find out more information before you agree to something, before you "sign a contract" with your mouth read the fine print. How often have people promised to do things and then say "I didn't realise it was...". – Michael Sep 11 at 22:31
4

I would say it is a matter of him realising, afterwards, the implications of his oath which he was not aware of at the time of making it. The example which springs to mind is Jephthah in Judges 11 :

[Verse 34] And Jephthah came to Mizpeh unto his house, and, behold, his daughter came out to meet him with timbrels and with dances: and she was his only child; beside her he had neither son nor daughter.

[Verse 35] And it came to pass, when he saw her, that he rent his clothes, and said, Alas, my daughter! thou hast brought me very low, and thou art one of them that trouble me: for I have opened my mouth unto the LORD, and I cannot go back.

Once he 'knew of it', he became aware of the implications of what he had said. Then he became 'guilty'.

I am not going to comment on what transpired after that. I have my own thoughts on that but do not wish to comment.

  • 1
    Whilst not an oath as such, Simon Peter did proclaim that he was willing to die for Jesus, only to deny him thrice. A gracious reminder to, as Jesus said, to let our Yea be Yea and our Nay be Nay. – Michael Sep 11 at 22:37
  • @Michael Indeed. Whatsoever is more than that - 'cometh of evil'. – Nigel J Sep 12 at 4:48

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.