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I thought the normal translation of 2 Timothy 3:12 was pretty cut and dried. I never really questioned it deeply which is unusual because I do what I can using English language tools (since I am not a Greek scholar). However, a circumstance arose where it became necessary to take a close look and, for me, what a ride. Most English language translations are almost unanimous with something like: "All who desire to live a godly life in Jesus Christ will suffer persecution."

It is the "suffer persecution" for which I was seeking the best English translation. Persecution seems to convey to the modern popular mind only the most severe treatments like physical harm, imprisonment, and death threats.

However, a look at how the greek phrase is employed across the NT seems to indicate, like so many other texts, that the context bequeaths the correct sense.

And, here, since the subject is "ALL" and the list of oppositional manifestations is long including everything from insults, marginalized, mockery, trick questions to death threats, imprisonment, and torture, (In the life of Jesus and Paul) it seems that persecution misses the point by degrees which is instructive, if true, to all audiences.

If I am correct, it seems like reading it "all who desire to pursue a godly life in Jesus Christ will "move forward against continuous opposition/difficulties" "would communicate the sense better.

And, if that translation is allowable, the question does arise regarding the voice and tense of the Greek. Who is performing the action. It seems it could be the believer simply in walking in a godly manner precipitates the oppositional motion. The Greek phrase translated "persecution" apparently is simply "moving towards something" as in "following" or "pursuing" something good OR bad.

Either way, this "all" inclusive subject adds substance and compliments other verses like John 15:20 and 1 Peter 4:12.

My post is to seek confirmation, expansion, correction of the direction in which I am moving.

If my question is inappropriate for this forum or worded incorrectly, please assist me to make it more appropriate in order to deliver the same result which I hope is evident.

Thank you.

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    Moderator notice: Please don't use the comment section to post answer content. Comment only if you have a request for clarification or suggestion to improve a post. If you have something that answers the question post it as an answer. And most especially avoid using the comment section as a way to post a mini answer that does not show any of its work. – Caleb Aug 27 at 18:56
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The διωχθήσονται of II Timothy 3:12 is the future tense, passive voice, indicative mood, third person, plural form of the verb διώκω. A simple search for all Greek New Testament verses containing words starting with διω* reveals these results. (I shall let the reader draw their own conclusions).

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