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The famous passage spoken by Jesus unto Peter reads: “Satan hath desired to have you, that he may sift you as wheat: But I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not: and when thou art converted, strengthen thy brethren.” - What does that mean? (Lk 22:31-32)

I’ve read the manner from that point till Acts before and you don’t see any references to any type of spiritual advances that are pointed out in contemporary Christianity. (Such as spiritual attacks or war against evil spirits)

1.)Was this all a figurative sense of what the Jews and Roman oppression were against the New Found Christian Church or upon him as an individual?

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In Matthew 16:18 Peter was described as the rock on which Jesus was going to build his church, only a few verses later we see Satan trying to attack Peter's thinking, shown by Jesus rebuking Satan and not directly Peter.

Later after Peter's denial of Jesus, and after the resurection, Jesus re-commissions Peter (John 21:15-17). Peter gave the first sermon of the early church (Acts 2) and is prominent in the book of Acts as one of the main leaders.

Some examples of others being specifically targeted for spiritual attack by Satan:

  1. In the book of Job, Satan desired to cause trouble for Job, which God allowed with strict limits (see Job 1 and 2).
  2. Genesis 4:7 does not mention Satan specifically, but does mention "sin" wanting to master/control Cain.

Peter also says in 1 Peter 5:8 that the devil prowels around seeking who he can devour (paraphrased).

Satan doesn't want God's kingdom to flourish, so if he used some of the Jewish community and Roman oppression against the early church this would not surprise me, but I think that in Luke 22:31-34, Jesus was speaking specifically to Peter, and we are able to learn from it and apply the learning today.

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