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In Esther 1:10 the king has seven eunuchs: Mehuman, Biztha, Harbona, Bigtha and Abagtha, Zethar and Carkas.

On the seventh day, when the heart of the king was merry with wine, he commanded Mehuman, Biztha, Harbona, Bigtha and Abagtha, Zethar and Carkas, the seven eunuchs who served in the presence of King Ahasuerus,

Later on, in Esther 2:21 there is a eunuch named Bigthan who is involved in a plot against the king:

In those days, as Mordecai was sitting at the king's gate, Bigthan and Teresh, two of the king's eunuchs, who guarded the threshold, became angry and sought to lay hands on King Ahasuerus.

And later still, Bigthan is referred to as Bigthana (Esther 6:2).

And it was found written how Mordecai had told about Bigthana and Teresh, two of the king's eunuchs, who guarded the threshold, and who had sought to lay hands on King Ahasuerus.

Is there a difference in the Hebrew text that would cause the different translations? If so, what is it?

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Yes. The name is spelled three different ways in the Hebrew text. Those differences are preserved in the transliterations you mention.

Esther 1:10 - Bigtha - בגתא

Esther 2:21 - Bigthan - בגתן

Esther 6:2 - Bigthana - בגתנא

Bigthan and Bigthana are listed as variant spellings in the translator's notes of the NET.Bible on 2:21, "tn This individual is referred to as “Bigthana,” a variant spelling of the name, in Esth 6:2." Likewise, they state on 6:2, "tn This individual is referred to as “Bigthan,” a variant spelling of the name, in Esth 2:21."

It is possible they regard Bigtha as a distinct individual from Bigthan(a). I view all three as variant spellings of the same name.

Note: Readers unfamiliar with Hebrew may note the different forms of the N equivalent. ן is used when the nun is the final letter of a word (called nun sofit). נ is used when nun is anywhere else in the word. There are five letters in Hebrew which have differing forms when at the end: kaf כ, mem מ, nun נ, pe פ, and tsadi צ.

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    FWIW, L.B. Paton's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Book of Esther (ICC; T & T Clark, 1908), pp. 66-71 has some discussion of proper names in the book, attending to linguistic matters along the way. – Dɑvïd May 19 '17 at 13:36
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    + Carey A. Moore, Esther (Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries; 1995), pp. xli-xliv -- also some useful discussion and bibliography on handling the numerous variations in spelling of personal names in Esther. – Dɑvïd May 20 '17 at 13:31

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