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51 And there followed him a certain young man, having a linen cloth cast about his naked body; and the young men laid hold on him: 52 And he left the linen cloth, and fled from them naked.
-- Mark 14:51-52 (KJV)

5 And entering into the sepulchre, they saw a young man sitting on the right side, clothed in a long white garment; and they were affrighted. 6 And he saith unto them, Be not affrighted: Ye seek Jesus of Nazareth, which was crucified: he is risen; he is not here: behold the place where they laid him.
-- Mark 16:5-6 (KJV)

I am in no way a hermeneutics veteran, and this idea may come off as new agey to certain people but I have been studying this quite a bit, and I find the clothing in both cases interesting.

Why would the young man in chapter 14, be wearing,essentially what is a shroud?

And in Chapter 16, a long white robe.

My question and suggestion is could these two ounces men not be shadow/reflection of the New Adam/Christ transfigured!?

He is going through death, and he is reborn/transfigured in the long white robe.

When the linen clothing falls away, there is no shame, for he has redeemed the sins of the world.

  • I'm not sure why you have been downvoted. The inclusion of the young man fleeing naked has always fascinated me. Why would Mark include such a thing? I hope someone is able to contribute something that might shed some light on this. I will give what you have said some thought. – enegue Apr 30 '17 at 4:01
  • I have edited the question to include the text you are referring to. If the KJV is not suitable, please edit to include your preferred version. – enegue Apr 30 '17 at 4:02
  • @enegue hello, I appreciate your edits and your comments. I hope that this can be figured out. Thank you, Nigel – Nigel Harrison May 1 '17 at 16:06
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The scene was much more crowded than we traditionally visualize

So Judas, having procured a band of soldiers and some officers from the chief priests and the Pharisees, went there with lanterns and torches and weapons.
-- John 18:3 (ESV)

The band of soldiers (speira) would have been at a minimum 200 soldiers. Since this was a traditional place of retreat and prayer, a large number of folks would have been in the area. A young man wrapped only in a linen sheet that may have been hastily grabbed and wrapped around himself in the late night. Remember Jesus and his disciples often spent the night here. Mark was a young boy at the time and was one of the few who may have been awake and witnessing this whole drama. It is held in tradition that it is Mark who fled naked since he is the only one to record this incident.

5 And entering into the sepulchre, they saw a young man sitting on the right side, clothed in a long white garment; and they were affrighted. 6 And he saith unto them, Be not affrighted: Ye seek Jesus of Nazareth, which was crucified: he is risen; he is not here: behold the place where they laid him.
-- Mark 16:5-6 (KJV)

The long white robe has been a sign of heavenly residence or purity. For example:

  1. 13 Then one of the elders answered, saying to me, “These who are clothed in the white robes, who are they, and where have they come from?”
    14I said to him, “My lord, you know.”
    And he said to me, “These are the ones who come out of the great tribulation, and they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb. 15 For this reason, they are before the throne of God; and they serve Him day and night in His temple;“
    -- Revelation 7:13-15 (NASB)

  2. And while He was praying, the appearance of His face became different, and His clothing became white and gleaming.
    -- Luke 9:29 (NASB)

  3. and His garments became radiant and exceedingly white, as no launderer on earth can whiten them.
    -- Mark 9:3 (NASB)

  4. I kept looking Until thrones were set up, And the Ancient of Days took His seat; His vesture was like white snow And the hair of His head like pure wool His throne was ablaze with flames, Its wheels were a burning fire.
    -- Daniel 7:9 (NASB)

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  • I have applied the standard formatting to your quotes. Don't forget to note the version of scripture you are using, for all your quotes. – enegue May 8 '17 at 4:46
  • Can you cite any document(s) that record the tradition that Mark was the young man? – enegue May 8 '17 at 5:01
  • It is always rather difficult to establish whether traditions about Bible writers come from. The tradition that Mark was a young man comes from the fact that he seems in all of the New Testament to be the junior partner. Again, he seems to be speaking for Peter when he writes the book. Although Matthew and Luke use extensive material from Mark, he's the only one who includes the incident of the young man. It probably made more of an impression on him then on the other disciples who are more concerned about Jesus or their own personal survival. – Ted DeRose May 9 '17 at 13:50
  • So far as I know there is no ancient document that states that he was the young man. The assertion seems to be based on the various references made in the New Testament to his youth and the fact that while Matthew and Luke use much of his material, only he seems to think that the incident referred to in the passage is worth relating. – Ted DeRose May 9 '17 at 14:04

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