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(KJV)1 Corinthians 4:3

But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged of you, or of man's judgment: yea, I judge not mine own self.

(KJV)1 Corinthians 4:5

Therefore judge nothing before the time, until the Lord come, who both will bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and will make manifest the counsels of the hearts: and then shall every man have praise of God.

Why does Paul use two different Greek words for JUDGE

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Another way to phrase the question might be, "Why does the King James Version (and most other versions) translate two different Greek words as judge"?

ἀνακρίνω (anakrinō) - at least in this context - refers to "judging" in the sense of scrutinizing, whereas κρίνω (krinō) here refers to judging in a more final juridical sense.

The Orthodox New Testament suggests the translation:

But to me it is a very small thing that I should be examined by you, or by a man's day [ανθρωπινης ημερας]; but neither do I examine myself.

For I am conscious of nothing in myself, but not in this have I been justified; but the One Who examineth me is the Lord.

Therefore cease judging anything before the time, until the Lord should come, Who both will bring to light the hidden things of darkness and make manifest the counsels of the hearts; and then to each one there shall be the praise of God.

The NASB also translates ἀνακρίνω as "examine".

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    +1 I think what might be missing here are explanations about how ἀνα is a greek prefix, indicating "up" or "against", and used as a legal term ... in the judicial sense of "putting someone up on trial" ... "to be be examined on a witness stand". Evidence of this as an ancient Greek practice might help too. Regardless, 1 Cor 4:5 carries the explicit sense of a "final verdict", only AFTER all of the extenuating circumstances/evidences are known; Examinations before this time are premature. It seems this answer is "right", but perhaps not clear to the OP. – elika kohen May 17 '17 at 0:44

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