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In Galatians 4:4-5, Paul describes the incarnation event:

But when the set time had fully come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, to redeem those under the law, that we might receive adoption to sonship.

The description of the Son as born under the law makes sense to me in context of the letter which deals so much with the law, but why does he also call out the Son as one "born of a woman"? Is this for some reason to stress his humanity? Or the method of the sending? And how does it tie in with any of the rest of the letter if at all?

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I think it is simply expressing his humanity. Born of woman indicates mortal humanity, that is the flesh, in contrast with "born of God" which is Spiritual. God sent his son as a mortal normal man like anyone else under the law to redeem them from the bondage of the law. John the Baptist was called greatest among those born of women (Matt 11:11). That reference is made for the ordinary mankind where the status of the citizens of heaven is compared with people on earth.

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But when the set time had fully come, God sent his son, born of a woman, born under the law, to redeem those under the law, that we might receive adoption to son ship.

This passage speak to me the Holy Father in his infinite wisdom and sovereignty set a time and made a way for man's redemption, Indeed, it was necessary for the redeemer to be born of a woman for this is the way all mankind are born and for the redeemer to be born in the likeness of man with the same feelings as those he would reconcile to the Father that come to him in faith (Romans8:3). We receive the adoption of sonship by walking in the newness of his spirit (Romans 8:15)

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I have always been interested that the curse on Adam seems to contain little hope,but the rebuke to the serpent tends to say that the redemption will come through Eve. He gave the command about the tree and the responsibility of its observation to Adam who stood by silently as it was broken.

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