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Please actually read the question earlier then defining it as a duplicate.
If its actually a duplicate, then OK, but if its not a duplicate please do not come to that conclusion by simply seeing the title, and seeing that it has the word genealogy in it, and think "Hey, other people asked about genealogy it's a duplicate."

How does the count in the Genealogy of Jesus issue get reconciled?

17 So all the generations from Abraham to David are fourteen generations; from David to the deportation to Babylon, fourteen generations; and from the deportation to Babylon to the Messiah, fourteen generations. (Matthew 1:17 NASB)

The Genealogy of Jesus the Messiah Counting Double

(1) Abraham was the father of Isaac
(2) Isaac the father of Jacob
(3) Jacob the father of Judah and his brothers.
(4) Judah was the father of Perez and Zerah by Tamar
(5) Perez was the father of Hezron
(6) Hezron the father of Ram
(7) Ram was the father of Amminadab
(8) Amminadab the father of Nahshon
(9) Nahshon the father of Salmon
(10) Salmon was the father of Boaz by Rahab
(11) Boaz was the father of Obed by Ruth
(12) Obed the father of Jesse
(13) Jesse was the father of David the king
(14) David was the father of Solomon by Bathsheba who had been the wife of Uriah.

(1) David was the father of Solomon by Bathsheba who had been the wife of Uriah.
(2) Solomon was the father of Rehoboam
(3) Rehoboam the father of Abijah
(4) Abijah the father of Asa
(5) Asa was the father of Jehoshaphat
(6) Jehoshaphat the father of Joram
(7) Joram the father of Uzziah
(8) Uzziah was the father of Jotham
(9) Jotham the father of Ahaz
(10) Ahaz the father of Hezekiah
(11) Hezekiah was the father of Manasseh
(12) Manasseh the father of Amon
(13) Amon the father of Josiah
(14) Josiah became the father of Jeconiah and his brothers, at the time of the deportation to Babylon.

(1) Josiah became the father of Jeconiah and his brothers, at the time of the deportation to Babylon.
(2) Jeconiah became the father of Shealtiel
(3) Shealtiel the father of Zerubbabel
(4) Zerubbabel was the father of Abihud
(5) Abihud the father of Eliakim
(6) Eliakim the father of Azor
(7) Azor was the father of Zadok
(8) Zadok the father of Achim
(9) Achim the father of Eliud
(10) Eliud was the father of Eleazar
(11) Eleazar the father of Matthan
(12) Matthan the father of Jacob
(13) Jacob was the father of Joseph the husband of Mary*
(14) Joseph the husband of Mary who gives birth to Jesus
(15) Jesus

In this manner of counting Jesus gets born as the Fifteenth Generation.

The Genealogy of Jesus the Messiah Counting Single

(1) Abraham was the father of Isaac
(2) Isaac the father of Jacob
(3) Jacob the father of Judah and his brothers.
(4) Judah was the father of Perez and Zerah by Tamar
(5) Perez was the father of Hezron
(6) Hezron the father of Ram
(7) Ram was the father of Amminadab
(8) Amminadab the father of Nahshon
(9) Nahshon the father of Salmon
(10) Salmon was the father of Boaz by Rahab
(11) Boaz was the father of Obed by Ruth
(12) Obed the father of Jesse
(13) Jesse was the father of David the king
(14) David was the father of Solomon by Bathsheba who had been the wife of Uriah.

(1) Solomon was the father of Rehoboam
(2) Rehoboam the father of Abijah
(3) Abijah the father of Asa
(4) Asa was the father of Jehoshaphat
(5) Jehoshaphat the father of Joram
(6) Joram the father of Uzziah
(7) Uzziah was the father of Jotham
(8) Jotham the father of Ahaz
(9) Ahaz the father of Hezekiah
(10) Hezekiah was the father of Manasseh
(11) Manasseh the father of Amon
(12) Amon the father of Josiah
(13) Josiah became the father of Jeconiah and his brothers, at the time of the deportation to Babylon.
(14) Jeconiah became the father of Shealtiel

(1) Shealtiel the father of Zerubbabel
(2) Zerubbabel was the father of Abihud
(3) Abihud the father of Eliakim
(4) Eliakim the father of Azor
(5) Azor was the father of Zadok
(6) Zadok the father of Achim
(7) Achim the father of Eliud
(8) Eliud was the father of Eleazar
(9) Eleazar the father of Matthan
(10) Matthan the father of Jacob
(11) Jacob was the father of Joseph the husband of Mary*
(12) Joseph the husband of Mary who gives birth to Jesus
(13) Jesus

In this manner of counting Jesus gets born as the Thirteenth Generation.

*Using information from the (NASB Translation)

To explain that it's not a duplicate

  • This is a genealogy line found in Matthew, and questions nothing about Luke's account.
  • This question pertains to the counting of generations.
  • This question wonders how Matthew 1:17 is not incorrect.
  • This question hopes to find out how Matthew 1:17 is correct.

Why its not a duplicate of "Jesus's genealogy: 28 generations or 41 since David?"

  • That question does a comparison study noticing the number of generations from David from the two accounts both Luke and Matthew
  • The 13-generatons gap in question has no application to Matthew 1:17
  • That gap he got by subtracting 41-28=13
  • Therefore that question applies to why there are thirteen more generations listed in Luke then in Matthew
  • This question here applies to why it states 13 generations instead of 14, or 15 generations instead of 14 as stated in Matthew 1:17.

In defense to: there are other, related, questions too.
The link provided gave the following results at the time of looking

  • Q: Why does Joseph have two different fathers when comparing Matthew and Luke's genealogies? [duplicate]

Again that question acts as a comparative study between Matthew and Luke's genealogies. This question here does not ask about who at all. It simply notices that where it states 14 in a "perfectly true document" the count gives either 13 or 15.

  • Q: Why does the genealogy in Luke come after Jesus' baptism?

This question asked here has nothing to do with Jesus' baptism. Therefore it makes no sense to me why its possibly that a genealogy count can have anything to do with a question about why the author decided to write the genealogy after the baptism.

  • Q: Why is the genealogy in Luke attributed to Mary?

That question completely focuses on the account given by Luke. Where as this question here completely focuses on the account given by Matthew.

  • Q: Jesus's genealogy: 28 generations or 41 since David?

This was already commented on.

  • Q: What is the significance of '7 generations' in Luke’s account of Jesus's genealogy?

That question applies to the numbering structure of Luke's account. Or does it really help me to understand about the 13 or the 15 from understanding the sevens? This question here applies directly and only to Matthew

  • Q: How does the Genealogy of Jesus issue get reconciled?

This is this current question.

marked as duplicate by James Shewey, Dɑvïd, Dan Jul 17 '16 at 21:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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In order to have the genealogy of Jesus occur in patterns of 14 ancestors, the author of Matthew had to make two known compromises. The first was to ignore three kings in the Old Testament - Joash, Amaziah and Uzziah (2 Chronicles 24:1-26:1). The second was to have David as the fourteenth ancestor in one group and as the first ancestor in the following group, but not so Josiah. Thus, Matthew's genealogy, from Abraham to David, from David to the Babylonian Exile and from the Exile to Jesus falls into exactly three sets of fourteen generations, just as stated in

Matthew 1:17: So all the generations from Abraham to David are fourteen generations; and from David until the carrying away into Babylon are fourteen generations; and from the carrying away into Babylon unto Christ are fourteen generations.

The author of Luke made somewhat different adjustments, to have Jesus' ancestry fall into a pattern of sevens.

  • I think it's helpful to note, although we in the western world keep genealogies primarily for record keeping (and therefore are insistent on literal, chronological accuracy), this was not always the view of the ancient world. Genealogies were used to tell stores, emphasize plot points, etc. That is, Matthew divided into sets of 14 to make a point; his manipulation of the genealogy was not only intentional, but manipulating as such was relatively common. – cegfault Jul 17 '16 at 3:53

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