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In Matthew 1:1, what is the function of Βίβλος?

Westcott and Hort / [NA27 variants] ΒΙΒΛΟΣ γενέσεως Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ υἱοῦ Δαυεὶδ / Δαυὶδ υἱοῦ Ἀβραάμ.

The NIV omits it:

New International Version This is the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah the son of David, the son of Abraham:

The ESV has "book of":

English Standard Version The book of the genealogy of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham.

The NASB and other have "record of":

New American Standard Bible The record of the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah, the son of David, the son of Abraham:

And Young's has "roll":

Young's Literal Translation A roll of the birth of Jesus Christ, son of David, son of Abraham.

Is it possible that "Matthew" was suggesting that his genealogy of Jesus was to serve as the official genealogy? Or was it a copy of an original? If a copy, where would the original be found?

And is the reference of Βίβλος as far as verse 16? Verse 17? Verse 25? Or other?

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Matthew's author was undoubtedly suggesting, indeed asserting that his genealogy of Jesus was to serve as the official genealogy. He was unaware of the alternative genealogy yet to be written in Luke's Gospel. Some English translations omit 'book', probably on the basis that it is redundant and perhaps stilted in modern English usage, while others use the more casual 'record'.

An original that the author may have used for the genealogy from Abraham to Zorobabel would probably be 1 Chronicles 1:34-3:19, although a parallel genealogy can also be found in Genesis and the Deuteronomic History. Matthew follows the Old Testament royal line quite closely, but omits Kings Jehoash, Amaziah and Uzziah in order to have 14 generations from David to the Exile:

Matthew 1:17: So all the generations from Abraham to David are fourteen generations; and from David until the carrying away into Babylon are fourteen generations; and from the carrying away into Babylon unto Christ are fourteen generations.

There is no known original for the genealogy subsequent to Zorobabel (Zerubbabel). The Jewish Encyclopedia says that priestly genealogies were scrupulously kept perhaps beyond the great-great-grandfather, but that all genealogical rolls kept in the Temple were destroyed under Herod I. Henceforth, even priests could be uncertain of their ancestry; commoners were unlikely to have known their ancestries beyond a grandparent.

The Βίβλος ends at verse 16, with the birth of Joseph, his marriage to Mary and the birth of their son Jesus. Verse 17 is an explanatory text for the genealogy, while verses 18-25 contain information about events up to the birth of Jesus.

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