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The Apostle Paul makes several references to circumcision throughout his epistles. However, in his epistle to the Philippians, he uses two different words for circumcision as the following two verses indicate. That is, the two words are κατατομή (katatomē) and περιτομή (peritomē), respectively.

Philippians 3:2-3 (USB4)
2 Βλέπετε τοὺς κύνας, βλέπετε τοὺς κακοὺς ἐργάτας, βλέπετε τὴν κατατομήν. 3 ἡμεῖς γάρ ἐσμεν ἡ περιτομή, οἱ πνεύματι θεοῦ λατρεύοντες καὶ καυχώμενοι ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ καὶ οὐκ ἐν σαρκὶ πεποιθότες,

Throughout the epistles of Paul he always uses περιτομή (peritomē) to refer to circumcision in the physical or spiritual sense. However, in this particular passage he mentions another word in reference to circumcision that he never uses anywhere else: κατατομή (katatomē).

What is the significance of this word in this passage, and why do translators ascribe negative connotations to its meaning? After all, Paul has used the word περιτομή (peritomē) in Romans and Galatians to refer to false circumcision. What is the therefore significance of κατατομή (katatomē) in the context of this passage, which only occurs once in the Christian New Testament?

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