A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.
10 added 258 characters in body
source | link

The linguistic analysis of the gospels suggests that Jesus' sayings were spoken in Aramaic, but recorded (significantly later) in Greek. For instance, the passage in John in which Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus displays clear indications that the conversation didn't happen, at least not in the way John describes it. By way of a play on words, Jesus tells Nicodemus that in order to enter the kingdom of God, he must be born from above/born again. This double entendre only makes sense in Greek, because the words for "born from above" and "born again" are the same in Greek: "ἄνωθεν" (anōthen). In Aramaic, however, the words have nothing in common. A few verses later, a similar situation unfolds, this time with a double entendre using the Greek word for both "spirit" and "wind" - "πνεῦμα" (pneuma). The fact that John is the only gospel which has Jesus using double entendres, the fact that John is the only gospel which has Jesus saying things that only make sense in Greek ( the Synoptics are usually language-neutral or provide hints of Aramaic roots), and all the other factors that make John so different from the Synoptics, it seems likely that John is telling a story that never really happened.

The linguistic analysis of the gospels suggests that Jesus' sayings were spoken in Aramaic, but recorded (significantly later) in Greek. For instance, the passage in John in which Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus displays clear indications that the conversation didn't happen, at least not in the way John describes it. By way of a play on words, Jesus tells Nicodemus that in order to enter the kingdom of God, he must be born from above/born again. This double entendre only makes sense in Greek, because the words for "born from above" and "born again" are the same in Greek: "ἄνωθεν". In Aramaic, however, the words have nothing in common. A few verses later, a similar situation unfolds,

The linguistic analysis of the gospels suggests that Jesus' sayings were spoken in Aramaic, but recorded (significantly later) in Greek. For instance, the passage in John in which Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus displays clear indications that the conversation didn't happen, at least not in the way John describes it. By way of a play on words, Jesus tells Nicodemus that in order to enter the kingdom of God, he must be born from above/born again. This double entendre only makes sense in Greek, because the words for "born from above" and "born again" are the same in Greek: "ἄνωθεν" (anōthen). In Aramaic, however, the words have nothing in common. A few verses later, a similar situation unfolds, this time with a double entendre using the Greek word for both "spirit" and "wind" - "πνεῦμα" (pneuma). The fact that John is the only gospel which has Jesus using double entendres, the fact that John is the only gospel which has Jesus saying things that only make sense in Greek ( the Synoptics are usually language-neutral or provide hints of Aramaic roots), and all the other factors that make John so different from the Synoptics, it seems likely that John is telling a story that never really happened.

9 added 258 characters in body
source | link

The linguistic analysis of the gospels suggests that Jesus' sayings were spoken in Aramaic, but recorded (significantly later) in Greek. For instance, the passage in John in which Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus displays clear indications that the conversation didn't happen, at least not in the way John describes it. By way of a play on words, Jesus tells Nicodemus that in order to enter the kingdom of God, he must be born from above/born again. This double entendre only makes sense in Greek, because the words for "born from above" and "born again" are the same; insame in Greek: "ἄνωθεν". In Aramaic, however, the words have nothing in common.   A few verses later, a similar situation unfolds,

The linguistic analysis of the gospels suggests that Jesus' sayings were spoken in Aramaic, but recorded (significantly later) in Greek. For instance, the passage in John in which Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus displays clear indications that the conversation didn't happen, at least not in the way John describes it. By way of a play on words, Jesus tells Nicodemus that in order to enter the kingdom of God, he must be born from above/born again. This double entendre only makes sense in Greek, because the words for "born from above" and "born again" are the same; in Aramaic, however, the words have nothing in common.  

The linguistic analysis of the gospels suggests that Jesus' sayings were spoken in Aramaic, but recorded (significantly later) in Greek. For instance, the passage in John in which Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus displays clear indications that the conversation didn't happen, at least not in the way John describes it. By way of a play on words, Jesus tells Nicodemus that in order to enter the kingdom of God, he must be born from above/born again. This double entendre only makes sense in Greek, because the words for "born from above" and "born again" are the same in Greek: "ἄνωθεν". In Aramaic, however, the words have nothing in common. A few verses later, a similar situation unfolds,

8 added 258 characters in body
source | link

The linguistic analysis of the gospels suggests that Jesus' sayings were spoken in Aramaic, but recorded (significantly later) in Greek. For instance, the passage in John in which Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus displays clear indications that the conversation didn't happen, at least not in the way John describes it. Nicodemus' confusion overBy way of a play on words, Jesus tells Nicodemus that in order to enter the kingdom of God, he must be born from above/born again. This double entendre only makes sense in Greek, because the words "born again" andfor "born from above" is only explicable in Greek; the words for these two phrasesand "born again" are identical in Greek, but inthe same; in Aramaic, they are completely differenthowever, the words have nothing in common.

The linguistic analysis of the gospels suggests that Jesus' sayings were spoken in Aramaic, but recorded in Greek. For instance, the passage in John in which Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus displays clear indications that the conversation didn't happen. Nicodemus' confusion over the words "born again" and "born from above" is only explicable in Greek; the words for these two phrases are identical in Greek, but in Aramaic, they are completely different.

The linguistic analysis of the gospels suggests that Jesus' sayings were spoken in Aramaic, but recorded (significantly later) in Greek. For instance, the passage in John in which Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus displays clear indications that the conversation didn't happen, at least not in the way John describes it. By way of a play on words, Jesus tells Nicodemus that in order to enter the kingdom of God, he must be born from above/born again. This double entendre only makes sense in Greek, because the words for "born from above" and "born again" are the same; in Aramaic, however, the words have nothing in common.

7 added 1491 characters in body
source | link
6 added 1491 characters in body
source | link
5 added 1491 characters in body
source | link
4 added 706 characters in body
source | link
3 added 411 characters in body
source | link
2 added 411 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link