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1d
comment What is the meaning of Romans 2:12?
Grasper - We value your inputs and views, but we ask you to write your comments so that what you or others see will place the appropriate emphasis on what the text really says. Thanks!
1d
comment DANIEL AND HIS THREE FRIENDS
Richard - We value your inputs and views, but we ask you to write your comments so that what you or others see will place the appropriate emphasis on what the text really says. Thanks!
2d
comment Did Jesus have actual marks or holes in his hands and side after his resurrection? John 20
@JoshuaBigbee - the signal identification of Jesus Christ at the Second Advent will be seeing one "pierced" (see Ps 22:16 and Is 53:5 and compare with Zech 12:10, which is repeated in Jn 19:34, Jn 19:37, and then in Rev 1:7). The emphasis at the end times is the visual identification of one "pierced" (or one maimed by crucifixion), which will be the signal identifier of Jesus Christ -- which is, incidentally, how the disciples had recognized him after his resurrection.
Apr
14
comment What about the eggs? (Deuteronomy 22:6-7)
Pablo, here is one monograph on the subject: Eliezer Segal, “Justice, Mercy and a Bird’s Nest,” JJS 42 (1991): 176–95. Another discussion looking through the eyes of rabbinic Judiaism and early Christianity would be: R. M. Johnston, “ ‘The Least of the Commandments’: Deuteronomy 22:6–7 in Rabbinic Judaism and Early Christianity,” AUSS 20 (1982): 205–15.
Apr
14
comment Did Jesus have actual marks or holes in his hands and side after his resurrection? John 20
@JoshuaBigbee - we have to take what we know from Scripture, and surmise the meaning. Is the same "lamb" whom John the Baptist saw at the River Jordan the same "lamb" that John saw in his vision of heaven? If Thomas touched the nail marks and spear piercing, could the "lamb" remain disfigured in his glorified body? Paul said that "flesh and blood" could not inherit the kingdom of God (1 Cor 15:50), but the resurrected Jesus had described his resurrected body as "flesh and bone" (Lu 24:39) The conclusion is that Jesus has a glorified body, but this body is material and appears scarred for life.
Apr
13
comment Does Granville Sharp's Rule indicate that “God” and “Savior” share a referent in Titus 2:13 and 2 Peter 1:1?
@Jas3.1 - no - click here. This example from the LXX carries no ones name, and thus no personal pronouns are involved. I was hoping this example was relevant to the original question....
Apr
13
comment Does Granville Sharp's Rule indicate that “God” and “Savior” share a referent in Titus 2:13 and 2 Peter 1:1?
@Jas3.1 - Would not the example from the LXX be reasonable and relevant to the original question?
Apr
13
comment In light of this scripture how does this fit in with a dispensational hermeneutic if this is the first resurrection?
@JoshuaBigbee - how can "first" have any meaning when there is no such thing as the "second"? (There would be no contrast of meaning, unless the second existed.) Thus the "second" resurrection is not explicit, but has to be inferred by the reader. Another inferential leap is the last judgment, which is not about sinners, but concerns those who do not have eternal life. The Books of Dead Works is thus inferred (like the "second" resurrection), because those without eternal life lived lives demonstrating through their deeds that they were dead spiritually -- i.e., they never had eternal life).
Mar
24
comment Can the term “eisegesis” apply to the interpretation of Old Testament passages as prophecies specifically of Jesus?
Fred - can you focus on some particular passage? Our website is not intended to provide a fishing expedition of general questions (no matter how interesting such as the one you presented), because we focus on interpreting passages. If we opened the doors to generalized questions, the "noise" level (not to mention immediate doctrinal interference) would drown out the "signal" of hermeneutical interpretation. Can you restructure your question so that the question is "pegged" to a particular verse or passage of Scripture? Questions then are tied to the texts, and not the other way around. Thanks!
Mar
23
comment What did the blind man from Bethsaida see?
Jason - do you see any correlation of the uprooted trees with the people in Bethsaida, whom the man was seeing (and who had rejected the testimony of Jesus)? If you focus your analysis along those lines (as an example) there is more difficulty to disagree with you. This website is not about convincing others what you think, but of convincing others what the text says about itself. Yes, our opinions matter, but we have to start with the text. This self-restraint (or self-discipline) forces us to develop our explanation around that the text says about itself. Thanks!
Mar
23
comment What is “the stump of Jesse”?
Dawn - thank you for your approach and robust explanation. The downvotes appear to come because the tone and content are more in line with what you and I would discuss over coffee at Starbucks. We want to delve into the passages and try to correlate passages with passages to align parallel meaning(s). In other words, your opinion is very valuable but only in the context of where and how you help to connect the dots. If you do not show the dots and how they connect, then I am no farther along that if I bought you coffee and we chatted for several minutes at Starbucks to catch up. Thanks!
Mar
23
comment How would Elisha plowing with 12 oxen have been understood at the time of writing?
Perry - Thank you for the approach you have taken. Can you provides us more information (or detail) that would not just rest on what you would tell me if we were drinking coffee at Starbucks? Can you provide us something with more analysis? Otherwise with just the anecdotal thought we are no closer to understanding the passage than if we speculated and pondered together what the passage means... Thanks!
Mar
23
comment Is it possible that the “name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit” is “Jesus”?
Ron - Many, many people would agree with you, but this is not the framework of this website. We want to limit our analyses to explaining what passages mean; if we opened the floodgates to creeds and dogma, we would be overwhelmed by noise. Everyone comes from some doctrinal background (everyone); in order to eliminate any "noise" we limit ourselves to interpreting the passages. The hope is that we can focus on the "signal" and eliminate (or at least mitigate) the noise. Again, many many of us agree with you, but this website tries to maintain strict adherence to just what the Scriptures say.
Mar
7
comment The Correct Meaning of Genesis 6:3 - Also Flesh or Is Flesh?
@PaulVargas - ¡claro que sí, señor!
Mar
7
comment The Correct Meaning of Genesis 6:3 - Also Flesh or Is Flesh?
Mike - According to the forward of the book, he wrote in modern Hebrew, which Professor Israel Abrahams translated into English.
Feb
21
comment What does the Greek word κύριος mean in 1 Cor. 12:3?
Matiu - your answers are not off-base. They are just too loose. A more aggressive approach would be to take the comment of Jesus in reference to David who "in the Spirit" referred to the LORD saying to my Lord (Matthew 22:43). That kind of analysis would be more "tight" from a grammatical perspective and thus not so loosey-goosey. Again, your observations are valid and relevant, but they are too loose (not to mention the lack of any references, since we all know that someone somewhere sometime has already looked at this issue and done some research of some sort). Thanks.
Feb
15
comment Who is “The Son” in Hebrews chapter 1: 8 ? Is He God in the strictest sense of the word, or a created being?
Augustine - thank you for your input. Each and every one of us comes from different traditions (to include Jewish). We want to know what the text says so that we can come to our own conclusions about the ethical and theological results. In other words, we dig into the texts and let the texts speak for themselves. Remember: these Biblical texts have existed and survived for millennia, so it is important to be careful that we interpret them to the best of our ability (but with not so much reliance on the opinions of opinions of opinions which form much of what we call our own traditions).
Feb
14
comment How many times does the Hebrew word הֵילֵל (heilel) occur in the Masoretic text?
@H3br3wHamm3r81 - Mike, the only way I can explain this to you is by writing a diagram. (If I recall, the advice to me from Jack Douglas was "More diagrams!") This diagram is my reasoning as to why Gérard Weil (composer of the Masorot for the BHS) had annotated "Mp sub loco" for Jer 47:2. (The term means that Weil had seen an apparent problem in the Masorah Parva of the Masoretic Text.) Please click here to review the diagram explanation. Very Respectfully,
Feb
13
comment How many times does the Hebrew word הֵילֵל (heilel) occur in the Masoretic text?
@H3br3wHamm3r81 - Mike, I just edited my posting to address your question.
Feb
8
comment Does Paul use a “Double Meaning” in his statement, “They were all baptised into Moses in the cloud and in the sea.”
@Bagpipes - I read the informative article (thanks). The Day of Pentecost (Feast of Weeks) was the day when the Word of God came down from heaven and was written on stones (giving of Law at Sinai-Old Covenant). On the same date the same Spirit writes the laws on hearts of flesh (New Covenant-Pentecost). The Israelites who escaped Egypt did not believe the word of God (unbelief) notwithstanding that the Divine Presence led them out of the slavery of Egypt. In a like manner, when people "taste" the power of God (Heb 6:4-5), but do not ingest/drink the living water, they too stand to fall away.