7,956 reputation
536
bio website facebook.com/joseph.lukowski
location San Antonio, Texas
age 49
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen 5 hours ago

I live and work in San Antonio, Texas.


Mar
24
comment Can the term “eisegesis” apply to the interpretation of Old Testament passages as prophecies specifically of Jesus?
Fred - can you focus on some particular passage? Our website is not intended to provide a fishing expedition of general questions (no matter how interesting such as the one you presented), because we focus on interpreting passages. If we opened the doors to generalized questions, the "noise" level (not to mention immediate doctrinal interference) would drown out the "signal" of hermeneutical interpretation. Can you restructure your question so that the question is "pegged" to a particular verse or passage of Scripture? Questions then are tied to the texts, and not the other way around. Thanks!
Mar
23
comment What did the blind man from Bethsaida see?
Jason - do you see any correlation of the uprooted trees with the people in Bethsaida, whom the man was seeing (and who had rejected the testimony of Jesus)? If you focus your analysis along those lines (as an example) there is more difficulty to disagree with you. This website is not about convincing others what you think, but of convincing others what the text says about itself. Yes, our opinions matter, but we have to start with the text. This self-restraint (or self-discipline) forces us to develop our explanation around that the text says about itself. Thanks!
Mar
23
comment What is “the stump of Jesse”?
Dawn - thank you for your approach and robust explanation. The downvotes appear to come because the tone and content are more in line with what you and I would discuss over coffee at Starbucks. We want to delve into the passages and try to correlate passages with passages to align parallel meaning(s). In other words, your opinion is very valuable but only in the context of where and how you help to connect the dots. If you do not show the dots and how they connect, then I am no farther along that if I bought you coffee and we chatted for several minutes at Starbucks to catch up. Thanks!
Mar
23
comment How would Elisha plowing with 12 oxen have been understood at the time of writing?
Perry - Thank you for the approach you have taken. Can you provides us more information (or detail) that would not just rest on what you would tell me if we were drinking coffee at Starbucks? Can you provide us something with more analysis? Otherwise with just the anecdotal thought we are no closer to understanding the passage than if we speculated and pondered together what the passage means... Thanks!
Mar
23
comment Is it possible that the “name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit” is “Jesus”?
Ron - Many, many people would agree with you, but this is not the framework of this website. We want to limit our analyses to explaining what passages mean; if we opened the floodgates to creeds and dogma, we would be overwhelmed by noise. Everyone comes from some doctrinal background (everyone); in order to eliminate any "noise" we limit ourselves to interpreting the passages. The hope is that we can focus on the "signal" and eliminate (or at least mitigate) the noise. Again, many many of us agree with you, but this website tries to maintain strict adherence to just what the Scriptures say.
Mar
7
comment The Correct Meaning of Genesis 6:3 - Also Flesh or Is Flesh?
@PaulVargas - ¡claro que sí, señor!
Mar
7
comment The Correct Meaning of Genesis 6:3 - Also Flesh or Is Flesh?
Mike - According to the forward of the book, he wrote in modern Hebrew, which Professor Israel Abrahams translated into English.
Feb
21
comment What does the Greek word κύριος mean in 1 Cor. 12:3?
Matiu - your answers are not off-base. They are just too loose. A more aggressive approach would be to take the comment of Jesus in reference to David who "in the Spirit" referred to the LORD saying to my Lord (Matthew 22:43). That kind of analysis would be more "tight" from a grammatical perspective and thus not so loosey-goosey. Again, your observations are valid and relevant, but they are too loose (not to mention the lack of any references, since we all know that someone somewhere sometime has already looked at this issue and done some research of some sort). Thanks.
Feb
15
comment Who is “The Son” in Hebrews chapter 1: 8 ? Is He God in the strictest sense of the word, or a created being?
Augustine - thank you for your input. Each and every one of us comes from different traditions (to include Jewish). We want to know what the text says so that we can come to our own conclusions about the ethical and theological results. In other words, we dig into the texts and let the texts speak for themselves. Remember: these Biblical texts have existed and survived for millennia, so it is important to be careful that we interpret them to the best of our ability (but with not so much reliance on the opinions of opinions of opinions which form much of what we call our own traditions).
Feb
14
comment How many times does the Hebrew word הֵילֵל (heilel) occur in the Masoretic text?
@H3br3wHamm3r81 - Mike, the only way I can explain this to you is by writing a diagram. (If I recall, the advice to me from Jack Douglas was "More diagrams!") This diagram is my reasoning as to why Gérard Weil (composer of the Masorot for the BHS) had annotated "Mp sub loco" for Jer 47:2. (The term means that Weil had seen an apparent problem in the Masorah Parva of the Masoretic Text.) Please click here to review the diagram explanation. Very Respectfully,
Feb
13
comment How many times does the Hebrew word הֵילֵל (heilel) occur in the Masoretic text?
@H3br3wHamm3r81 - Mike, I just edited my posting to address your question.
Feb
8
comment Does Paul use a “Double Meaning” in his statement, “They were all baptised into Moses in the cloud and in the sea.”
@Bagpipes - I read the informative article (thanks). The Day of Pentecost (Feast of Weeks) was the day when the Word of God came down from heaven and was written on stones (giving of Law at Sinai-Old Covenant). On the same date the same Spirit writes the laws on hearts of flesh (New Covenant-Pentecost). The Israelites who escaped Egypt did not believe the word of God (unbelief) notwithstanding that the Divine Presence led them out of the slavery of Egypt. In a like manner, when people "taste" the power of God (Heb 6:4-5), but do not ingest/drink the living water, they too stand to fall away.
Feb
8
comment Does Paul use a “Double Meaning” in his statement, “They were all baptised into Moses in the cloud and in the sea.”
@Bagpipes - The Israelites in Egypt were saved from their physical bondage (through Moses) but not through their spiritual bondage (through the Lord). The difference was not "baptism," but whether or not faith was operative in the heart. The seed that withered in the sun (Matt 13:20) is an excellent illustration: The one on whom seed was sown on the rocky places, this is the man who hears the word and immediately receives it with joy; yet he has no firm root in himself, but is only temporary, and when affliction or persecution arises because of the word, immediately he falls away.
Jan
27
comment Does Mark 11:26 mean that those who do not forgive others are not forgiven by God?
@Anonymous - I qualified my statements to meet your concern - Very Respectfully,
Jan
24
comment Was Jesus’ commandment to “love enemies” (Matthew 5:43) meant literally?
Janet - forgiveness in the Christian New Testament appears in connection with financial obligations (that is, somebody owes money to somebody). Is there any interpretation open, then, that the one who is forgiven also loses credibility (that is, they are no longer credit-worthy to receive more lending of money)? If you agree, can you provide us your thoughts/analysis? If you are willing, please re-edit your post to draw light on the texts that help us understand the nuance between forgiving others (who now have no credibility with us), but who remain lovable notwithstanding. Very Respectfully,
Jan
24
comment What does it means to “afflict your souls” as in Lev. 16?
Carmen - Do you see any relation between the fast (associated and commanded during the Day of Atonement) and this idea of self-affliction during the Day of Atonement? If you agree, can you research this connection and then re-edit your posting for us? (For example, is there any evidence in the Biblical texts that this fast will ever be converted into a feast?) Any update from you in this regard would help. Thanks! Very Respectfully,
Jan
12
comment John 14:14 in P75
@Luis - Please click here, which is the analysis of this text from various sources. This Logos 6 resource comes from comes from: Metzger, Bruce M., United Bible Societies (1994). A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament, second edition (companion volume to the United Bible Societies’ Greek New Testament, 4th rev. ed.). London; New York: United Bible Societies, p.208. Feel free to ask more questions, however, a new "question" may be appropriate for this site.
Jan
12
comment John 14:14 in P75
@Luis - I use Logos 6 Software. For example, the NA28 does not reference P66 as a source text for the first part of this verse (click here), and so the anomalous features of P66 for this verse appear to be the scribe's inattentiveness to detail according to Comfort et al. (click here), which is perhaps why the NA28 omits its reference for the main part of the verse, which was not the case for NA26 and NA27.
Jan
9
comment John 14:14 in P75
Please click here and here, for the respective manuscripts.
Dec
31
comment What did 'adoption' mean to the Romans?
Davïd - I love the BibleWebApp site with the verse and Bible versions side-by-side - awesome resource and reference. Thank you (and Happy New Year)!