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May
19
answered “Voice” or “string” in Psalm 19:4?
May
18
revised Does the book of Ecclesiastes portray Qohelet as the author?
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May
18
answered Does the book of Ecclesiastes portray Qohelet as the author?
May
18
answered Do linguistic features of Ecclesiastes rule out Solomon as the author?
May
16
revised How is the Septuagint interpretation of Psalms 40:6 reconciled with the Hebrew text?
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May
16
revised How is the Septuagint interpretation of Psalms 40:6 reconciled with the Hebrew text?
Tweaks
May
15
revised How is the Septuagint interpretation of Psalms 40:6 reconciled with the Hebrew text?
edited body
May
15
revised How is the Septuagint interpretation of Psalms 40:6 reconciled with the Hebrew text?
edited body
May
15
answered How is the Septuagint interpretation of Psalms 40:6 reconciled with the Hebrew text?
May
11
comment What is the difference between “soul” and “spirit”?
@e.s.Kohen - The word ר֚וּחַ appears for both men and beast in Eccl. 3:21, -- that is, notwithstanding that both have the ר֚וּחַ (which the context makes clear in Eccl. 3:19-20) -- what happens after death is another discussion, since animals are not made in the divine image. You are correct that these various terms appear almost interchangeably throughout the Bible, and so warrant scrutiny when they appear in their respective contexts.
May
9
comment Looking Me Whom They Have Pierced - Zechariah 12:10
@RevelationLad - The Mishnah and subsequent Talmud appeared after the closing of the New Testament canon. What is somber and causes much reflection is that the eschatological "Meshiach ben Joseph" appears to be a candidate for the Antichrist, and the "Meshiach ben David" the candidate for the False Prophet, if and when we read the Revelation of John, the Book of Daniel, and portions of 1 and 2 Thessalonians as "futurist" predictive prophecy.
May
9
comment Looking Me Whom They Have Pierced - Zechariah 12:10
@RevelationLad - I think that today whenever any Christian partakes of the Lord's Table they are "seeing" the pierced one, because the bread represents his broken body and the cup represents his blood.
May
9
answered What do the jeers towards Elisha of “Go on up” mean?
May
8
answered Looking Me Whom They Have Pierced - Zechariah 12:10
May
6
awarded  Revival
May
4
revised Psalm 19:3: whose voice?
Tweaks
May
4
revised Psalm 19:3: whose voice?
Tweaks
May
4
comment Psalm 19:3: whose voice?
@Susan - According to vv. 1-2 of this Psalm, the heavens and earth are "declaring" and "uttering" the existence of the Creator, but these proclamations do not come through spoken words but through what is seen. This context suggests that the שָׁמַע of v.4 has nothing to do with sounds per se, but with the wider context of understanding "words unspoken." The same implication was evident when Jesus said, "let him who has ears hear" -- that is, the emphasis is not on processing audible words, but understanding through what was seen (e.g., the signs of Jesus as the "word" of God).
May
4
comment Psalm 19:3: whose voice?
@Susan - This Psalm is about the creation testifying (in silence) to the existence of the Creator. The Apostle Paul alluded to this Psalm in Romans 1:20 as the basis for the existence of God. That is, this silent testimony to mankind occurs without the use of any words. The response of man is obedience to the Creator, but not through any objects (idolatry) of the creation.
May
4
comment Psalm 19:3: whose voice?
@Susan - In the Bible "hearing" is not only the idea of processing sounds through the human ear but also perceiving and understanding with the mind. As you know, in Biblical Hebrew, "listening to the voice" of someone is an idiom for obedience.