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8h
comment Rev 9:4: Do not hurt the non-existing grass?
@Bagpipes - Do you see nuclear war here? Effects within the earth's atmosphere ("global warming" in extremis) combined with solar activity appear to cause temperatures on earth to soar (Rev 7:2-3 and Rev 7:16). If the eschatological outlook of the last century was to see the events of Revelation as nuclear war, then we in this century today must look through the lens of cyber warfare, where such sophisticated implements of war may be made useless since they rely on computers to function (and thus the appearance of horses, for example, supporting mechanized military and logistics operations).
1d
answered Rev 9:4: Do not hurt the non-existing grass?
Apr
22
revised “Pangs of death” in Acts 2:24
added 401 characters in body
Apr
22
comment John 12:32 - What/Who Does the “All” refer to?
Susan - great comment!! Do you know how to hyperlink the verse reference you made? If you can hyperlink your verse references, folks will be able to check the verse for personal reference. (Finally, in the future, can you tie something from the Hebrew Bible, or Old Testament, to help to see any possible connections?) Thanks!!!
Apr
22
answered “Pangs of death” in Acts 2:24
Apr
19
comment DANIEL AND HIS THREE FRIENDS
Richard - We value your inputs and views, but we ask you to write your comments so that what you or others see will place the appropriate emphasis on what the text really says. Thanks!
Apr
19
answered The fifth rib in Abner
Apr
18
reviewed No Action Needed How would stoning of an adulterer actually be carried out under the Law of Moses?
Apr
18
revised What is the difference between οὐ δύναται (1 Jn 3.9) and Ἀδύνατον (Heb 6.4)?
added 4625 characters in body
Apr
18
answered What is the difference between οὐ δύναται (1 Jn 3.9) and Ἀδύνατον (Heb 6.4)?
Apr
18
comment Did Jesus have actual marks or holes in his hands and side after his resurrection? John 20
@JoshuaBigbee - the signal identification of Jesus Christ at the Second Advent will be seeing one "pierced" (see Ps 22:16 and Is 53:5 and compare with Zech 12:10, which is repeated in Jn 19:34, Jn 19:37, and then in Rev 1:7). The emphasis at the end times is the visual identification of one "pierced" (or one maimed by crucifixion), which will be the signal identifier of Jesus Christ -- which is, incidentally, how the disciples had recognized him after his resurrection.
Apr
14
comment What about the eggs? (Deuteronomy 22:6-7)
Pablo, here is one monograph on the subject: Eliezer Segal, “Justice, Mercy and a Bird’s Nest,” JJS 42 (1991): 176–95. Another discussion looking through the eyes of rabbinic Judiaism and early Christianity would be: R. M. Johnston, “ ‘The Least of the Commandments’: Deuteronomy 22:6–7 in Rabbinic Judaism and Early Christianity,” AUSS 20 (1982): 205–15.
Apr
14
awarded  Revival
Apr
14
revised Does Granville Sharp's Rule indicate that “God” and “Savior” share a referent in Titus 2:13 and 2 Peter 1:1?
edited body
Apr
14
comment Did Jesus have actual marks or holes in his hands and side after his resurrection? John 20
@JoshuaBigbee - we have to take what we know from Scripture, and surmise the meaning. Is the same "lamb" whom John the Baptist saw at the River Jordan the same "lamb" that John saw in his vision of heaven? If Thomas touched the nail marks and spear piercing, could the "lamb" remain disfigured in his glorified body? Paul said that "flesh and blood" could not inherit the kingdom of God (1 Cor 15:50), but the resurrected Jesus had described his resurrected body as "flesh and bone" (Lu 24:39) The conclusion is that Jesus has a glorified body, but this body is material and appears scarred for life.
Apr
13
answered Did Jesus have actual marks or holes in his hands and side after his resurrection? John 20
Apr
13
comment Does Granville Sharp's Rule indicate that “God” and “Savior” share a referent in Titus 2:13 and 2 Peter 1:1?
@Jas3.1 - no - click here. This example from the LXX carries no ones name, and thus no personal pronouns are involved. I was hoping this example was relevant to the original question....
Apr
13
comment Does Granville Sharp's Rule indicate that “God” and “Savior” share a referent in Titus 2:13 and 2 Peter 1:1?
@Jas3.1 - Would not the example from the LXX be reasonable and relevant to the original question?
Apr
13
comment In light of this scripture how does this fit in with a dispensational hermeneutic if this is the first resurrection?
@JoshuaBigbee - how can "first" have any meaning when there is no such thing as the "second"? (There would be no contrast of meaning, unless the second existed.) Thus the "second" resurrection is not explicit, but has to be inferred by the reader. Another inferential leap is the last judgment, which is not about sinners, but concerns those who do not have eternal life. The Books of Dead Works is thus inferred (like the "second" resurrection), because those without eternal life lived lives demonstrating through their deeds that they were dead spiritually -- i.e., they never had eternal life).
Apr
12
answered Does Granville Sharp's Rule indicate that “God” and “Savior” share a referent in Titus 2:13 and 2 Peter 1:1?