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Apr
10
comment What is the significance of 153 fish?
Another interpretation I found is that there were 153 nations known to the Greek/Romans at the time. I've heard it in some homily, but didn't find the source.
Nov
7
comment How exactly does parable of a tower and a war (Luke 14:28-33) mean that we should give up everything we have?
@ThaddeusB: thanks, I think it helped. The "love/hate" refers verse 26, where "hate" is not opposite of the love we owe to our neighbors, but of loving them too much, more than Jesus ("me" in the text of the Gospel). I'll edit this to clarify.
Dec
20
comment Why did Elisabeth remain in seclusion in Luke 1:24?
+1. A good point. I'm not sure what did Elizabeth know about miscarriage, but she must have known there is such a risk. I don't consider changing accepted answer, but I think this is as good as Rhetorician's answer.
Dec
20
comment Why did Elisabeth remain in seclusion in Luke 1:24?
Like Gone Quiet said, first few paragraphs are not necessary, I already knew that. But the end of your answer really helped me, so +1 and accepted.
May
27
comment “Believing wife” or “sister” in 1 Corinthians 9:5?
When I read your P.S. and explored your link more carefully (including some more dictionary play), it really helped me to understand the original text, and both why is it usually translated as it is and why it could support the claim I mentioned in addendum to my question. I accept it.
May
27
comment “Believing wife” or “sister” in 1 Corinthians 9:5?
Thanks, now I see where the mistake's origin. +1
May
5
comment Parallelism in the Beatitudes
This is a further step - meditation over the consequences of parallelism in the Beatitudes. I asked this question to find out how "correct" is to use the Beatitudes this way, and you didn't answer my question. But thanks, this is one point to consider while meditating and examining the Biblic text further.
May
1
comment How can we determine if a text is sarcastic?
The definition in the first paragraph is good, but it means misunderstanding on side of the reader can be easily confused with sarcasm on the side of the author. This post seems is a good example. I myself don't like the idea of apostle Paul being a male chauvinist and would argue against such a position, but claim that some pericope is inconsistent with author's beliefs and thus is sacrastic is simply too strong. If there are controversies on what the author really believed, calling something "sarcasm" is probably just a dirty trick to cancel a pericope supporting my opponents.