6,339 reputation
1132
bio website simply-a-christian.com
location United States
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen 1 hour ago

Well, I'm certain that I will begin the RCIA process soon at my local parish. I just read "Born Fundamentalist, Born Again Catholic" by David B. Currie. What an amazing book! So, perhaps next Easter, I'll be baptized and partake of my first legitimate Lord's Supper (Communion).

I recently completed two papers which are available on the Articles section of my website. One is a discourse on the phrase "the first day of the week" in the KJV translation of the New Testament. The other is an exegesis of John 3:3.

Let me know what you think (contact@simply-a-christian.com).

  1. The First Day of the Week in the New Testament
  2. You Must Be Born Again - An Exegesis on John 3:3

Jan
13
comment What was Noah thinking when he sent a raven from the ark?
I wonder why Luther seems to accuse Jerome of being the origin of the supposed mistake. After all, the LXX (which was translated by Jewish interpreters) translated it as ἐξελθὼν οὐχ ὑπέστρεψεν, meaning "and after it went forth, it did not return." So, this pre-dated Jerome.
Jan
12
comment Did God say that Adam will die on the same day he ate the fruit?
@brillaint: No, it's not as simple as "death is death." Not even Judaism believes that. The NT does teach us that men can be physically alive yet spiritually dead.
Jan
11
comment Why does the genealogy in Luke come after Jesus' baptism?
For more information, you may read my blog post on this subject. simply-a-christian.com/blog/the-genealogy-of-the-gospel-of-luke
Jan
10
comment What is the meaning of τῆς παραγγελίας in 1 Tim. 1:5?
Sooooo...τῆς παραγγελίας means "the commandment"? If so, what does "the commandment" refer to? You focused more on τέλος and I didn't ask about that.
Jan
9
comment What does “sit” mean in the scripture “The prostitute who sits on many waters.”
Come on ladies and gentlemen. We need to encourage questions on this forum. If you believe the question is good enough to answer, please be kind and reward the individual with an upvote for taking the time to ask (just like you would be thankful for receiving an upvote after taking the time to answer). :)
Dec
31
comment Eat my flesh and drink my blood
I've never seen that verse in 2 Sam. 23 before. Thanks! :)
Dec
31
comment What is the best translation of πᾶς ἀνὴρ in 1 Cor 11:4?
There's absolutely no possibility. The Greek would have to say "πάντες εἰ μὴ [ἡ] γυνὴ..."–
Dec
30
comment Times of the restitution of all things
@user2479: And others are welcomed to express their view. Point being, however, that this is not a debate forum. As long as you understand that.
Dec
30
comment Times of the restitution of all things
@user2479: I wasn't delving into any sort of theology. I was going by the standard usage of the word within the context of other scriptures. You also don't need to respond to my answer. If you think my answer does the job of answering your question - whether you agree with it or not - you simply upvote it. If you think it's of low quality, then you would downvote it. But, I won't be engaging in a debate about the theology related to the answer itself; there's no point.
Dec
30
comment How to interpret Isaiah 9:6?
@JimThio: I agree with you.
Dec
30
comment How to interpret Isaiah 9:6?
@JimThio: I did translate it as "was born," right? :)
Dec
30
comment How to interpret Isaiah 9:6?
Christians and Jews believe that. David Kimchi was an Orthodox Jewish rabbi. The only thing I would agree with is that it speaks of Jesus. Anything but that, I consider nonsense. :)
Dec
30
comment How to interpret Isaiah 9:6?
@JimThio: I'm wondering if you actually read Radak's comment? "And you should know that it is a typical behavior of the past tense verbs in the holy language to use the past tense in place of the future tense (which is marked by the letters איתן), and this is mostly in prophecies because the matter is clear as if past, because it has already been decreed."
Dec
29
comment How to interpret Isaiah 9:6?
@JimThio: Yes, it is "perfect tense." The translation "was born" is fine. Biblical Hebrew verbs only have a past (some call it "perfect") and a future (some call it "imperfect"). They don't exactly correlate to English, so to think the perfect must be translated as "has been born" (like the English perfect) isn't accurate. In general, "perfect" refers to completed events, whereas "imperfect" does not (Biblical Hebrew imperfect includes English present and future tenses). And I edited my original post to include some information for you.
Dec
29
comment How to interpret Isaiah 9:6?
@JimThio: About the past tense of "was born" and "was given," you'd be wrong there. Let me edit my post and demonstrate why.
Dec
29
comment How to interpret Isaiah 9:6?
קָרָא שְׁמָהּ בָּבֶל - (Gen. 11:9) who called its name Bavel? Is the subject of the verb referring to a singular, masculine-gender subject, as the noun קָרָא suggests (based on its conjugation)? No, it's not. The Hebrew is understood as "its name was called (passive) Bavel." Isa. 9:6 is no different. The only difference is just that the verb is a imperfect w/ vav ha-hipukh, which effectively makes it perfect. But, in Gen. 11:9, the verb is written perfect. וַיִּקְרָא = קָרָא. No difference. Same phenomenon.
Dec
29
comment How to interpret Isaiah 9:6?
@JimThio: There is nothing "telling" about my choice of "and his name was called" as opposed to "and he called his name." As it stands, there is NO subject for the verb וַיִּקְרָא. To say that "פֶּלֶא יוֹעֵץ אֵל גִּבּוֹר אֲבִיעַד" is the subject but then שַׂר שָׁלוֹם is the name of the object (i.e., his name), is quite arbitrary and "telling" in its own right. I noticed that another individual said that the child could not be called "mighty God"..."Because only God is called Mighty God, and not any of God's creations." Err...that's assuming the premise that the child is NOT God.
Dec
20
comment Who are the people of God in Psalm 100?
That's certainly one way of reading the text. On the other hand, the person commanding (addressing) others may simply be including himself as one of the inhabitants of the earth.
Dec
20
comment What was Onan's sin?
@GoneQuiet: Sounds good. Thanks for the clarification.
Dec
20
comment What was Onan's sin?
@GoneQuiet: By adding "rabbinic interpretations," doesn't that contradict the disclaimer you wrote at the end of your post? How can the reader not interpret your post in the context of Jewish doctrine or belief when you include rabbinic interpretations (i.e., the interpretations of Jewish rabbis)? I don't mean to be confrontational at all. I'm just curious...because it seems almost impossible to do so.