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Nov
5
comment Meaning of στοιχεῖον (stoicheion)
Just a quick question: why wouldn't τὰ στοιχεῖα τοῦ κόσμου meaning "heavenly bodies" be credible in the first place? One of the usages of τὰ στοιχεῖα elsewhere is indeed heavenly bodies. And, that's always been my understanding of that passage. I don't know about Druidism though. At the least, we're talking about Pagan idolatry.
Oct
28
comment Who is the God of God in Psalm 45:8?
Are you asking about the translation? Or the interpretation?
Oct
23
comment Judges 17:7 - How could the young man be both “a Levite” and “of the family of Judah”?
"This is certainly how the author/redactor, who put these apparent contradictions within the same verse, intended it to be understood." I believe that's the question at hand and is not so certain.
Oct
23
comment Judges 17:7 - How could the young man be both “a Levite” and “of the family of Judah”?
Your explanation would definitely explain the significance of the phrase "...of Beit-Lechem of Yehuda..." It means he lived in Beit-Lechem, a city of Yehuda. However, it fails to explain the significance of the phrase "...of the family of Yehuda..." This implies descent from the tribe of Yehuda, and tribal descent is only derived paternally. Same as being a Levite. So, how could this man be a Levite (from his father) and also of the family of Yehuda (likewise from his father)? That's the question. Now, if you can provide a scripture that proves mishpocha is also used of land, that helps.
Oct
15
comment Is יהוה ever transliterated in the Septuagint?
If you are referring to ὀ and ὁ, yes, both are omicrons.
Oct
15
comment Is יהוה ever transliterated in the Septuagint?
This is omicron: ο. This is omega: ω.
Oct
14
comment Is יהוה ever transliterated in the Septuagint?
ὁ is the Greek letter omicron. Omega is ω. Yes, each has a different diacritic. It would be ho theos, with a rough breathing before the ὁ (which is what that diacritic signifies). ὀ would be without rough breathing.
Oct
11
comment Is the “captain of the Lord's host” an angel or God Himself?
Interesting take...the hornet aspect. :)
Oct
11
comment Is יהוה ever transliterated in the Septuagint?
@Jim Thio: ὁ is simply the definite article, equivalent to the English word "the." The exact pronunciation of ו varies depending on dialect and era. Today, most would pronounce it as a voiced labio-dental fricative (IPA: /v/)and transliterate it into English as "v." However, in antiquity, some say it was pronounced as a labio-velar approximant (IPA: /w/) and, as such, it would be transliterated into English as "w." As I mentioned, it also functioned as a vowel. So, it could represent a "u" (it is then called shuruk), or it could represent a "o" (it is then called cholam male), וּ and וֹ, resp.
Oct
8
comment Land of Moriah or Mount Moriah?
As an aside, why is the definite article prefixed to moriyah? That's not normal, is it?
Sep
27
comment Is there an issue with translating the word “worshiped” in Matthew 14:33?
@Jack Douglas: I see what you mean. Yes, it does have other senses outside the NT. I thought you meant its usage in the NT. That being said, no, I don't think there's a word in the Koine Greek language that is only used for worship due to God.
Sep
27
comment Is there an issue with translating the word “worshiped” in Matthew 14:33?
@Ali: If by "answerer," you mean me, then no, I don't believe it's necessary to edit my answer to reflect that, as the original question didn't ask about other words, but instead, about "this word" translated as "worship" in Matt. 14:33. That Greek word was προσκυνέω.
Sep
27
comment Is there an issue with translating the word “worshiped” in Matthew 14:33?
@Jack Douglas: So, whether their god is the true god or not, their actions may still be described as λατρεύω, what I would call "worship" in its truest sense, given to a (supposed) deity.
Sep
27
comment Is there an issue with translating the word “worshiped” in Matthew 14:33?
@Jack Douglas, yes, it still means divine worship in Acts 7:42. I think we both agree that an idolater believes he is worshipping the true god, or gods (if he believes that there is more than one god). Of course, we know that he is mistaken. Nevertheless, the point is that he believes he is worshipping the true god, and thus his actions reflect divine worship (λατρεύω). It's like, what Muslims do to Allah is indeed λατρεύω, yet I would consider Muslims to be idolaters. What the ancients Greeks did to Zeus was λατρεύω, yet again, we know that they were idolaters.
Sep
27
comment Is there an issue with translating the word “worshiped” in Matthew 14:33?
I would say that λατρεύω is predominately if not always used in reference to divine worship.
Sep
16
comment What does it mean in Matthew 24:15 and Mark 13:14 when the text says, “Whoso readeth, let him understand”?
@PatFerguson, Jesus prophesied about a future abomination. So, I see no possibility that Jesus was referring to something that had already happened.
Sep
3
comment What is the likely way in which ancient Hebrews would have understood “raqiya” in Gen 1:6?
You would have had no reason to understand it as anything but literal had you lived 5000 years ago. You only know such a belief is erroneous now, in hindsight, due to the advance of science. Moshe and others wouldn't have questioned it. As far as God perpetuating this misunderstanding...well, I suppose you could say that if you believe the Bible was intended to be a science book.
Sep
1
comment Judges 17:7 - How could the young man be both “a Levite” and “of the family of Judah”?
So, I upvote the answer, but I do not accept the rabbis' reasoning which is based on textual alteration.
Sep
1
comment Judges 17:7 - How could the young man be both “a Levite” and “of the family of Judah”?
You know Yonatan was the grandson of Moshe (and the son of Gershom), right? For the sake of Moshe's honor, the Masoretes did not want to relate Yonatan to Moshe. So, they inserted a nun between the mem and shin in Moshe's name, thus making it Menashe. That is why the nun in the name Menashe in that verse (Judges 18:30) is higher than the other letters ("litera suspensa" as the footnotes calls it). See here: aleppocodex.org/newsite/index.html Go to section for Judges 18:20-19:10, look at middle column, twelfth line from top, second word from (right) margin.
Aug
26
comment Who is Iscah in Genesis?
To note, this means the idea that Avraham married his actual sister (or half-sister) isn't so true after all. He would have married his niece.