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bio website simply-a-christian.com
location United States
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen 1 hour ago

Well, I'm certain that I will begin the RCIA process soon at my local parish. I just read "Born Fundamentalist, Born Again Catholic" by David B. Currie. What an amazing book! So, perhaps next Easter, I'll be baptized and partake of my first legitimate Lord's Supper (Communion).

I recently completed two papers which are available on the Articles section of my website. One is a discourse on the phrase "the first day of the week" in the KJV translation of the New Testament. The other is an exegesis of John 3:3.

Let me know what you think (contact@simply-a-christian.com).

  1. The First Day of the Week in the New Testament
  2. You Must Be Born Again - An Exegesis on John 3:3

Jun
1
revised Does the idea of being “born again” have a root earlier than John/Peter (or Jesus)?
added 290 characters in body
May
31
revised Does the idea of being “born again” have a root earlier than John/Peter (or Jesus)?
added 322 characters in body
May
31
answered Does the idea of being “born again” have a root earlier than John/Peter (or Jesus)?
May
30
revised What is the meaning of “Place your bread on the grave of the righteous” in Tobit 4:17 NRSV?
edited body
May
23
awarded  Disciplined
May
22
revised Whose words were kept from falling to the ground?
edited tags
May
22
answered Whose words were kept from falling to the ground?
May
19
comment Language question in Mark 15:34
Ah, yes, I recall that now. That's obviously it. :)
May
19
comment Language question in Mark 15:34
But, why didn't the author simply translate the first statement in the first place and simply omit the rest (from "which" onwards). Any ideas?
May
19
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
Can you share from which Bible "not in English" you encountered your latter translation?
May
19
revised The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
edited tags
May
14
awarded  Benefactor
May
10
comment What is the significance of the phrase ὁ ὢν καὶ ὁ ἦν καὶ ὁ ἐρχόμενος in the Apocalypse?
In a week, I will review the answers to see which is most detailed, which has the most support (citations, quotes from scholars), and of course, which answers the questions posed. Thanks everyone for your contributions thus far. They are each excellent. Also, if you give your opinion on what something means, and it isn't that obvious, please corroborate your opinion by citing a reputable scholar who concurs with your opinion.
May
10
awarded  Promoter
May
10
accepted Did Avraham marry Hagar? Did Ya'akov marry Zilpah?
May
10
comment Did Avraham marry Hagar? Did Ya'akov marry Zilpah?
Since you're the only one who answered, you'll get the best answer.
May
10
asked Explanation of the Textual Variant in Mark 14:65
May
9
revised Who is being described in Rev. 13:11-12 and in what context do we understand the verses?"
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May
8
comment What does μονογενὴς Θεὸς means in John 1:18?
But the reader should know that there can be no absolute certainty that μονογενὴς Θεὸς is the correct reading in John 1:18. The reader will then need to answer based on the assumption that it is the correct reading.
May
8
comment What is the significance of the phrase ὁ ὢν καὶ ὁ ἦν καὶ ὁ ἐρχόμενος in the Apocalypse?
But Rev. 1:11 is also a textual variant, with Ἐγώ ἐιμι τὸ Α καὶ τὸ Ω, Ὃ πρῶτος καὶ ὁ ἔσχατος being supported by hardly any witnesses. The majority omit it. As Heinrich Meyer notes, "The addition after λεγούσης, ʼεγώ εἰμι τὸ α καὶ τὸ ω, ὁ πρῶτος καὶ ὁ ἔσχατος καὶ (Elz.), is without attestation." And, I hate to admit it, but Rev. 22:13 is a bit ambiguous too as to who it is referring to by the phrase "the Alpha and the Omega."