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bio website thelaterprophets.blogspot.com
location New York, NY
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Aug 15 at 10:35

Jul
5
comment How can we ensure a given “chiasm” was intentional by the author, and is not merely fanciful eisegesis?
@Jas3.1, I actually think intentionality is a spectrum of possibilities as well...In some places a chiasm may have been planned out and executed as a specific strategy by the author and in other cases it may have emerged because of stylistic habits or some subconscious intent of the author and every possibility in between. At the end of the day authorial intent is a tricky idea for any text (unless you can just ask the author and even then...), especially in a text as culturally and historically distant to us as the Bible.
Nov
26
comment Why are the peoples of your house your enemies?
To me this seems like a perfectly reasonable hyperbole.
Nov
25
comment Why are the peoples of your house your enemies?
Michah is describing how evil his society become: "The godly man is perished out of the earth...they all lie in wait for blood...the best of them is a brier...for the son dishoroureth the father, the daughter riseth up against her mother...a man's enemies are the men of his own house" (JPS). Does this answer your question or are you looking for something else?
Sep
14
comment When is allegorization of scripture productive?
Nicely done as usual.
Sep
10
comment What exactly did Moses do wrong at Meribah?
The unique analysis offered here is the most compelling of any I've ever seen. Part I deals with the classical medieval Jewish commentators but Part II is an extremely thorough and close reading of the text. I may try to summarize the main points in this essay and offer it as an alternative answer.
Sep
9
comment Silence of the idols and silence of the people before Yahweh in Habakkuk 2:18-20
@Kazark, that's a good point. I will make an edit.
Mar
2
comment Where did Samuel come from when he was summoned by the Medium of En-dor?
@false0start, But what is Sheol?
Feb
20
comment How should the first line of Judges 5:2 be translated?
1) Am I to understand that this is your own original translation of the Hebrew which you contributed to the Wikisources' Bible project? 2) What is the meaning of the "(R)"s and the "(S)"s? 3) Are you able to elaborate on the specific translation choices you made here and why?
Dec
16
comment Why didn't Joseph try to contact his father from Egypt?
Added some more content. Please let me know this hurts or helps the question.
Dec
16
comment Why didn't Joseph try to contact his father from Egypt?
@BruceAlderman, I think so: vbm-torah.org/parsha/10miketz.htm (but this only offers a partial answer). Thematically, I think this issue is very deep.
Dec
16
comment Historically, how was Jonah classified in terms of literary genre?
I think there are two questions here: 1) "the Book of Jonah was historical until the rise of critical scholarship" - Is the book of Jonah a historical narrative or literary fiction? 2) "how was Jonah classified in terms of literary genre?" - What is the book's literary genre/style (parody, satire, humor, etc.)? Notice that these two questions are completely independent and the answer of one need not affect the answer of the other.
Dec
13
comment What was life like in Eden before the fall?
Nice answer, +1. According to your answer "And God saw all that He made, and found it very good," doesn't apply to the world as we find it today. I find this assumption to be very difficult to accept and I think there is strong literary/thematic/textual evidence to the contrary. Moreover, I don't think Genesis 1 is talking or can be applied to the Garden of Eden at all. Perhaps we'll get a chance to discuss this issue in chat sometime.
Dec
9
comment What exactly was the “death in the pot”
@JonEricson, definitely. Also, the Elisha narratives are some of the most bizarre and enigmatic in all of Tanakh. I think the wild style in those narratives reflects the fact that Elisha himself was an enigma and the people in his own time never really understood him.
Dec
9
comment What exactly was the “death in the pot”
you are correct. I have deleted my earlier comment. Instead I meant to say: the literal translation of the Hebrew word רע is "evil." Those who translate: "there was no more bitterness in the pot" are departing from the literal meaning of the verse and offering interpretation.
Dec
1
comment Did Ahaz burn up his sons in the fire or pass them through the fire?
What does "byd" mean and what does "akot" mean?
Nov
24
comment When did Jonah compose his prayer in chapter 2?
You may very well be correct in your reading of Jonah, I just don't think these are simple issues.
Nov
24
comment When did Jonah compose his prayer in chapter 2?
I strongly disagree with a black-and-white notion of truth and falsehood. It isn't useful, enlightening or edifying to think about the Bible's narrative history in these terms. A Bible story, or some detail of a story may be intended as a metaphor, exaggeration, allegory or literary invention without disaffirming the word of God or minimizing the importance of that text. IMO, a text that is informative, meaningful and religiously significant is more "true" than an exact transcription of past events.
Nov
9
comment “Back in ships to Egypt” in Deut. 28
@JonEricson, a) Today and in Biblical times people travel from Israel to Egypt by sea, b) I don't think that the only time the threat in Deut. 28 was ever carried out was in Jeremiah 43. I assume that over the course of multiple exiles there were plenty of opportunities for Israelites to be put on ships and sold as slaves in Egypt-whether or not we have a record of it.
Nov
8
comment What do we learn from the different usages of “aman” and “batach” in the OT?
@JonEricson, not really. I explain why in the "clarification" section I added.
Nov
4
comment What is the relationship between the “Adversary” in Job and the serpent in Genesis?
Milton's Paradise Lost, describes the fourth option in some depth.