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May
25
comment Why does Jesus tell his mother his “hour has not yet come”?
Hi Kate and welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics! This is a very helpful answer--especially after your edit. I'll have to think about it, but this is a plausible (likely even) explanation. Thank you.
May
24
comment Is there a modern English translation of the Bible that uses the second-person plural pronoun?
Wow! That's awesome. I'm giving you a big ol' +1 for your works which is exactly what I was looking for! I'd love to accept and make a big deal your answer... but it's not really a full answer. Maybe you could copy-n-paste the details text you wrote up for the app. But even better would be if you explained how you managed it. Did you learn something new about the Biblical languages? I'd love to hear more. In any case, a hearty "Welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics to you!"
May
24
comment What does it mean that the least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than John the Baptist?
I'm protecting this question because I think it's a difficult one to answer for people who aren't familiar with the sort of answers we are looking for. New users might want to spend some time answering other questions first to build up the minimal reputation needed to post an answer to this question.
May
23
comment Why does the Hebrew word “chesed” in Psalm 136 have two meanings?
Hi alvoutila. I'm not sure I understand the question. Every verse in Psalm 136 uses the same refrain that includes חסד. So I don't understand why you are picking out verses 23 and 24. Can you help me understand the question?
May
21
comment How does Peter fit the events of Acts 2 into the apocalyptic imagery of Joel?
There's lot's of interesting stuff here. You've given me a ton to think about. (+1) It would be interesting to unpack the final paragraph, which makes a bold claim that many interpreters would likely dispute. But that's a whole 'nother question. Have you considered self-answering your own questions?
May
21
comment How does Peter fit the events of Acts 2 into the apocalyptic imagery of Joel?
One candidate for the desecration is the sacrifice made to the standards of Rome shortly before the temple was put to the torch. But it seems like you got off course since my question was about Acts and not Matthew 24. (I do find the Preterist interpretation compelling, as you might have guessed. ;-) (+1 for the first paragraph, which makes a good connection.)
May
21
comment How does Peter fit the events of Acts 2 into the apocalyptic imagery of Joel?
@brilliant: I have not. Wow! That's a lot of material. I'll take a look.
May
21
comment How does Peter fit the events of Acts 2 into the apocalyptic imagery of Joel?
I gave this a +1 largely for the first paragraph. But Peter could have ended the quotation before the apocalyptic imagery. Why did he choose to continue the quotation? In particular, it seems like he continued the quote just to get in the "everyone who calls upon the name of the Lord shall be saved." Then he shifts back to preaching about the earthly life of Jesus. That seems strange.
May
17
comment Are men (brethren) really men or are they human?
This seems to be true for a great many languages, including Greek and the Romance languages. An expanded answer might include details about how one might tell if males only are intended and examine the reasoning for translating into English (where the rule does not hold) one way versus another.
May
13
comment What is the difference in meaning between Χριστός Ἰησοῦς and Ἰησοῦς Χριστός?
I'm troubled by the final paragraph, which is just bad theology. But more importantly to this site, I'm curious if you have a source to back up the claim in the first paragraph.
May
10
comment Psalm 51:5 CEV vs ESV
See also: To what extent is Psalm 51:4 poetic exaggeration?
May
10
comment Why does Jesus tell his mother his “hour has not yet come”?
I wanted to highlight the part of this post that addresses the question: "her reaction then showed no indication of offense". That's a wonderful observation from the text and points us in a helpful direction. If you could show the rest of your answer from the text or by referencing some historical information, I could vote this answer up. As it is, it falls short of being useful to me (though your perspective is interesting and probably correct).
May
9
comment Did Mark intend to end his gospel at 16:8?
See also: Does the “lost leaf” theory for Mark's abrupt ending fail if written on a scroll?
May
6
comment How should we understand the “Cleansing of the Temple”?
+1. In addition, the money changers themselves (even if they were completely honest) would have been one of the barriers to worship for foreigners. Since the temple did not take foreign currencies, a person from a distant nation would have needed to take an extra step that a local would not have. The final quote from Isaiah 2 fits in well with the Mark version which includes the fig-tree miracle: "And Jesus answered them, “Have faith in God. Truly, I say to you, whoever says to this mountain, ‘Be taken up and thrown into the sea,’..." (Mark 11:22-23a ESV)
May
6
comment How should we understand the “Cleansing of the Temple”?
I'm not sure how I missed this until now, but thanks for the answer. Out of curiousity, why did you skip Matthew?
May
6
comment Did Jesus have the legal authority to cleanse the temple?
Hmmm... I suppose it depends a bit on how effective Jesus action was in reforming the Temple. My thought is that after a few hours, the tables had been set right, the money-changers were back in action and the animals (whether blemished or not) were waiting to be slaughtered. In other words, the action itself was not effective. In that scenario, Jesus' authority as builder of the temple would have been less immediate to his role as prophet. But ultimately, as you say, if Jesus saw himself as David's son, he had authority in the temple for that reason as well.
May
6
comment Did Jesus have the legal authority to cleanse the temple?
Hi Matthew and welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics! This is an excellent answer and well argued. Since I wrote my answer, I've read The Challenge of Jesus by N. T. Wright. He suggests that Jesus' action in the temple was symbolic judgment against it along the lines of Jeremiah smashing clay jars or Ezekiel lying on his side. I don't think that view conflicts with the view that Jesus was taking on the role of King and son of David, however. Thanks again for the answer and I'm looking forward to more. :)
May
3
comment Was Mark A Scribe?
That's a good, but difficult question. Note that even the best answer will amount to informed speculation, however.
Apr
29
comment What are the limits to the Christological hermeneutic?
While I agree that the Christological hermeneutic is the interpretation philosophy of the New Testament, I'm not convinced that the three quotations from Paul illustrate it. Certainly, he interpreted everything in light of the cross (and your allegory is a good one), but there are other places in Paul (and from Jesus himself) that show how Christians re-interpreted the Scriptures in light of the person of Jesus and saw the church as fulfilling the promises made to Abraham and Israel. But good stuff overall and +1.
Apr
26
comment Do the Dead Sea Scrolls argue against Aramaic primacy?
See also: What language did Jesus commonly speak?