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Stack Exchange employs me as a Community Manager. I've been known to respond to jericson@stackexchange.com.

You can read about what I've done over the years in my curriculum vitae.

On a personal note, I'm married and have three children. Our oldest son loves school, friends, games, and reading. (He can't wait to get on our LEGO® Answers site, but he's not quite old enough. My posts there are usually at his request.) Two of my children happen to have been born on the same day. I sometimes write about that experience.

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Occasionally, I write a post for Eschewmenical.


Jun
17
comment What are the two bronze mountains in Zechariah 6?
Thank you for coming back to this answer; it's much stronger for it.
Jun
15
comment Does “Thou hast said”equate to “yes”?
Interesting survey. Would you say that it depends on context?
Jun
14
comment When James and Jude use κύριος is their meaning limited to “master”?
May I suggest we meet in the The Library to discuss the question further? (I'm getting lost in the comments. ;-)
Jun
14
comment When James and Jude use κύριος is their meaning limited to “master”?
@brilliant: That I don't know. I just was looking at the NET Bible footnotes on the verse.
Jun
14
comment When James and Jude use κύριος is their meaning limited to “master”?
@brilliant: Well, that verse happens to have a lot of textual variations. It seems possible to me (and certainly to Dr. Tabor) that Jude originally used θεός here as is preserved in some manuscripts.
Jun
14
comment When James and Jude use κύριος is their meaning limited to “master”?
I'm actually more interested comparing Jude and James to Paul. Paul's writing is rather more voluminous than Jesus' brothers' short letters. I'm going to edit the question to narrow the scope to those letters, but I hope you will still be able to use this answer with minor edits.
Jun
11
comment Who or what is Rahab in Job?
Hi Park and welcome to our site. This answer is perhaps too speculative for our site. It also doesn't directly address the textual issue, which involves the odd coincidence of the same word being applied to the woman who rescued the Israelite spies and some sort of sea creature. Perhaps you could source your information?
Jun
11
comment What is the meaning of “day and hour unknown”?
Hi Pat and welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics! You clearly know your way around Greek and textual criticism; this is exactly the sort of expert answers we are looking for. If I had one complaint, it would be that I wish you'd given us your considered judgment about what the verse means. (This is exactly the opposite complaint I usually have about answers from new users, by the way. ;) Well done and I hope to see you around.
Jun
10
comment What is “sin that leads to death” in 1 John 5:16?
@Richard: Welcome back! (One of the joys of the site is seeing new activity on old posts. It's great to see answers getting refined.) I think the bolded phrase in question is a parenthetical. John is digging into how members of the community should treat each other, but doesn't want the reader to lose the bigger thread of the letter, which deals with false teachers. (But it's been awhile since I've thought about the question, so I might need to rethink my answer.)
Jun
10
comment Do modern interpreters use the methods of Talmudical hermeneutics?
Hi yarony and welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics. I refocused the question to be about the modern usage of Rabbi Ishmael's rules. Please consider an making an edit if you feel I've misrepresented your question somehow.
Jun
9
comment Were all the cananites slaughtered or not?
Oh. I missed that you had edited. I re-read the answer when I made the comment, but it didn't sink in that it clarified things. Moving some of your comments into the body would help. (You've got my +1, so you don't need to add anything if you don't feel like it. I just think a map would make the answer even better.)
Jun
9
comment Were all the cananites slaughtered or not?
@Bruce: In that case, I misunderstood your first paragraph. Would you consider an edit to expand on the idea that Joshua 10 is just the southern tribes? (A map would probably help for those of us with only a passing knowledge of geography in the region.)
Jun
9
comment Can John's Passion chronology be reconciled with that of the Synoptics?
It seems (from the question) that only two verses in John are at odds with the Synoptics. If anyone thinks other verses should be addressed, feel free to edit (or suggest an edit).
Jun
9
comment Can John's Passion chronology be reconciled with that of the Synoptics?
Well argued and explained. Thank you.
Jun
9
comment Can John's Passion chronology be reconciled with that of the Synoptics?
This is a fine self-answered question, though asking for a chart might be a touch too restrictive. ;-)
Jun
7
comment Were all the cananites slaughtered or not?
@Niclas Nilsson: It's pretty likely that Joshua 10 is hyperbole. Ancient writings often exaggerated the accomplishments of kings in this way. See, for instance, the Merneptah Stele which (falsely) asserts that a number of people groups, including Israel, were wiped out by Egypt's pharoah.
Jun
7
comment Does the Bible mention unicorns?
Hi Nathan and welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics! Please consider creating an account. While I agree that rhinoceros is one likely possibility for what the Hebrew word referred, I think it's misleading to use the 1828 Webster's definition. In this day and age, "unicorn" means something entirely different. (You covered that ground better in your video. Could I persuade you to edit this answer to go into a bit more detail?)
Jun
4
comment Was the LXX ending to Job written in Greek?
Interesting. Do you happen to have a link to the Septuagint text of Job or an English translation? (If it's easy for you to add, it'll save me a few minutes to look one up. ;-)
Jun
3
comment What is the meaning of “day and hour unknown”?
I agree with @Tim that there are other possible interpretations of these verses. Note that this is an example of the triple tradition of the parable of the fig tree. One plausible interpretation is that the tree represents the temple. If so, it might have next to nothing to do with Matthew 25:13, which is in the context of the parable of the virgins.
May
25
comment Why does Jesus tell his mother his “hour has not yet come”?
Hi Kate and welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics! This is a very helpful answer--especially after your edit. I'll have to think about it, but this is a plausible (likely even) explanation. Thank you.