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2d
comment How should the story of David's concubines be read?
This is an interesting connection, but I'm not sure it answers the question except the final sentence. Can you expand on the cultural stigma aspect?
Nov
12
comment Who subjected the creation to futility in Rom. 8:20-21?
Welcome to the Biblical Hermeneutics-Stack Exchange! The ancient Greek texts did not have capitalization, so that's more evidence of how the translators interpreted the text than what Paul might have intended it to mean. I'm not convinced either that God doesn't hope for the new creation in the anticipatory sense.
Aug
28
comment Did Paul intend his letters be taken as Scripture?
I concur with @ThaddeusB. Your first paragraph is a good start at answering the question. I think the key element is that since the letters were written for particular purposes, Paul included material that's fairly irrelevant to other parts of the Christian movement. In particular, we faithfully copy the greetings and admonitions to individuals who are no longer known to us. Paul could have saved significant effort in copying those bits if he'd made clear lines between "Scripture" and the rest.
Apr
27
comment Is Paul's visit to Jerusalem detailed in Galatians 2 the Jerusalem Council?
@JoshuaBigbee: Isn't it possible to interpret the texts as meaning there was a secret meeting that Paul writes about in Galatians followed within the year by the public meeting described in Acts, which produced a separate letter (the one preserved in Acts)? In other words, I can accept the chronology in this answer without necessarily holding that the two accounts refer to the same meeting. A more helpful answer would start with the texts and end with a proposed chronology rather than the other way around.
Apr
25
comment Is Paul's visit to Jerusalem detailed in Galatians 2 the Jerusalem Council?
Interesting diagram! But I don't see how the date of the Crucifixion plays into the question. I'm asking about the texts themselves and not the chronology.
Dec
20
comment Statistically, how similar is the NIV to other translations such as the RSV?
Obviously, this does not address the problem of varying Greek and Hebrew sources.
Nov
26
comment What is it that Paul prays Ephesians will comprehend?
The clarification that "comprehend" meaning to "grab hold of" rather than as a synonym to "understand" helps explain they the author prays for "strength". Thanks!
Nov
25
comment What is it that Paul prays Ephesians will comprehend?
@BenjaminHoogterp: That reads like the nugget of an answer.
Aug
7
comment Does Song of Songs 8:6 contain a reference to YHWH?
Welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics—Stack Exchange! I'm not sure it helps, but have you seen HebrewBooks.org? They might have a copy of the page you are looking for.
Aug
7
comment Is Deuteronomy 22:28 talking about rape?
Hi Brian. Thanks for the answer. We are more than willing to get new answers on questions no matter how old, so thanks. I've edited your answer a bit to improve some formatting. (We use Markdown.) Your points are very helpful and especially the note that actual rape carries a different punishment.
Jun
11
comment To what extent is Psalm 51:4 poetic exaggeration?
Welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics Stack Exchange! This is an interesting analogy and a useful perspective. The one reservation I have is that I don't know if that way of looking at the law might be anachronistic. Do you have a reference, by any chance?
Jun
9
comment Forgive us our “debts”? “sins”? “trespasses”? Which is the most accurate translation?
@Susan: Feel free to suggest an edit and one of us will very likely approve it. The Blue Letter Bible seems to agree with you. My guess (given only a small amount of understanding of the Greek language) is that this is was an error caused (somehow) by transliterating the word to Latin characters and back to Greek. φ => ph => πη
May
30
comment Has the meaning of “Love” changed enough to warrant substitutions in Bible translations?
@Susan: There's still a copy in the Wayback Machine.
Feb
25
comment What do we know about Paul's family?
Hi DrFry and welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics--Stack Exchange. I'm going to delete this answer for the moment, since we really are serious about attribution. If you edit this answer to show what you quoted and from where (and provide a little context explaining how the quotation answers the question), we can see about undeleting this answer for you. Feel free to flag a moderator when you're done editing.
Dec
31
comment Is there a sacramentalism in the “Bread of Life” discourse?
@metal: Thanks for the pointer. I have not noted Dr. Blomberg yet; I'll look into his work. (And thanks for stopping by the site again. I reread your answer here and appreciated it again a great deal.)
Dec
28
comment The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse
@Dan: I think the current version is way too broad. The original might have been too broad as well. Asking about prophecy usefully almost demands asking about a specific interpretive framework.
Dec
28
comment The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse
It seems to me the question is really too broad, but this answer is a valiant effort. It's certainly one (interesting) interpretation.
Dec
19
comment How should we understand the “Cleansing of the Temple”?
@Bruce Alderman: That sounds a bit like what what N.T. Wright suggested in The Challenge of Jesus, if I recall correctly.
Dec
9
comment What is the “first resurrection”?
Hi DeWayne. It sounds like you know a thing or two about the passage. But I can't help but notice that you didn't quite answer my question. (Or at least, I think you mean there is only one resurrection, but you don't come out and say that.) You might answer in your web page, but we are looking for complete and well-supported answers. Have you seen our tour page? It might help you see where we are coming from here. ;-)
Nov
30
comment Is it possible to be unbiased when interpreting Scripture?
@Jas3.1: I find that argument distinctly uncompelling because it sets up a false dichotomy. People (including scientists) tend to change their worldviews based on a combination of factors. It's rare to find people who've changed their religious convictions via pure reason. Gadamer suggests for humanities as Kuhn says of science: progress does not proceed by strictly following methods, but by occational, perhaps revolutionary, insights.