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Oct
21
comment Are there scriptural standards by which a hermeneutic method can be measured?
@Bob: Maybe because its the end of a long day, but I don't understand the question. Could you rephrase your comment?
Oct
21
answered Pre-Christian, Jewish interpretation of Psalm 22
Oct
20
asked Are Andronicus and Junia(s) apostles?
Oct
20
revised What is “sin that leads to death” in 1 John 5:16?
Added a source.
Oct
20
comment Which hermeneutical approaches support a literal interpretation of the Creation account?
There's been quite a bit of debate on meta and the chat about how questions like these should be asked, if at all. As you point out, the question seems to start off on the wrong foot altogether. Personally, I upvoted your answer and agree with it. Your excellent analogy about the route from New York to London probably belongs in the answer itself.
Oct
20
answered What is “sin that leads to death” in 1 John 5:16?
Oct
20
comment Are there scriptural standards by which a hermeneutic method can be measured?
I answered the question contained in the body, but I see the title asks a broader question. One or the other (or both!) should probably be edited to make them agree (even at the expense of making my answer irrelevant).
Oct
20
answered Chronology of Jesus' ministry: John and the Synoptics
Oct
20
accepted Is Paul suggesting that Philemon release Onesimus from slavery?
Oct
20
comment Is Paul suggesting that Philemon release Onesimus from slavery?
Yes, thank you. Given the rest of the Pauline corpus, I think you've hit the nail on the head. Paul's concern is to heal relationships first and correct social injustice later (if ever). It would be nice if he had called for an end to slavery altogether here, but he didn't.
Oct
20
answered Are there scriptural standards by which a hermeneutic method can be measured?
Oct
20
comment Are there scriptural standards by which a hermeneutic method can be measured?
@GalacticCowboy: That sounds like a question. (But looks like a statement. ;-)
Oct
20
comment Impact of order of letters to the Thessalonians
I found a note about Bruce's view on page 70 of this article.
Oct
19
comment Impact of order of letters to the Thessalonians
Do you have a reference for the size ordering? I know that Paul's letters are ordered by size (Romans is the longest and Philemon the shortest), but I always assumed the "sequels" were grouped with the first letter and always followed it. Doesn't 2nd Thessalonians refer to some former communication?
Oct
19
comment Which hermeneutical approaches support a literal interpretation of the Creation account?
@Richard: Definitely. Christian fundamentalism, which we are obliquely talking about (so the question is still off-topic, I suppose), derives its philosophic justification from Cartesianism whether its proponents know it or not. The idea that we can strip away old traditions has become a tradition in itself. My (unstated) answer would be to go back as far as we can into the culture of the ancient Hebrews and see if we can rebuild their creation story as they saw it. Or to put it another way: to reclaim the original tradition as much as possible.
Oct
19
comment Which hermeneutical approaches support a literal interpretation of the Creation account?
The philosophical side of me is compelled to point out that there is a very similar problem in science: new observations are informed and limited by current theory. Our understanding of the world is trapped in a particular paradigm. According to Thomas Kuhn, when the weight of evidence against the current paradigm becomes unsupportable, the paradigm violently shifts to another theory that has been waiting in the wings. I suggest we escape the circle by piling up textual evidence and see what breaks.
Oct
19
comment Which hermeneutical approaches support a literal interpretation of the Creation account?
If I understand you correctly, you view the "literal" interpretation as largely a result of reading doctrine ("the Earth is very young") into the text and that the alternative is to read a different doctrine into the text. What would you suggest as a way out of the circle?
Oct
19
revised Which hermeneutical approaches support a literal interpretation of the Creation account?
Added a key link
Oct
19
comment Is Paul suggesting that Philemon release Onesimus from slavery?
How do you read "no longer as a slave" in verse 16? (I can guess, but it would help your answer if you address what might be the key pro-manumission phrase directly.) Second, if Paul's request is to have Onesimus sent to him, that sounds like the slave would be freed. Maybe you can elaborate on how it's possible to be a slave to one man (Philemon) while serving another (Paul) on the opposite side of the world. (Again, I can predict the answer, but it would help your case to spell this out.)
Oct
19
answered Which hermeneutical approaches support a literal interpretation of the Creation account?