920 reputation
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bio website linkedin.com/in/kevinmote
location United States
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visits member for 2 years, 6 months
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I graduated from Washington State University in Computer Science (undergrad + masters). I've spent over 10 years in software development for a National Laboratory, a startup engineering company, and a nuclear processing plant. This has provided me with a diverse set of experiences and skills. I have worked extensively in such technologies as C++ (w/ MFC, STL, & Boost), C#, Python, and Qt. I'm also quite familiar with VB.Net, HTML/XML, SQL, Java, and Open Inventor as well as tools like Visual Studio, JIRA, and Subversion. I have a strong background in mathematics & graphics and have delved into graph & network theory, information visualization, data analytics, SCADA/HMIs, and artificial intelligence. I'm a Windows expert with Linux/Mac experience.

Also, I'm not quite as old as I look.

http://kevinmote.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevinmote


Apr
15
comment How does a Bible translator know if it is a poem?
@fdb- (Note: It is generally considered good form on this site to cite your sources, rather than referring to some purported "copious evidence".) As documented in Wikipedia the preponderance of evidence indicates "Qumran Hebrew" was spoken in 1st CE and "Mishnaic (or Rabbinic) Hebrew" was spoken for several centuries thereafter.
Apr
8
comment How should 2 Cor 5:10 be interpreted, in light of Isa 43:25?
@JackDouglas- That's a very helpful suggestion. Thank you! I don't have the time to make the changes right now, but I will attempt to do so.
Apr
8
comment How does a Bible translator know if it is a poem?
@fdb - By the way, evidence that demonstrates that Paul did speak fluent Hebrew is found in Acts 21:40, 22:2, and 26:14.
Apr
8
comment How does a Bible translator know if it is a poem?
@Daniel- great question! I don't believe Genesis 1 is generally regarded by translators or commentators as poetry in the strict sense (although v 27 certainly is); but it certainly contains some poetic elements, doesn't it? I'd have to do more research to know for sure.
Apr
8
comment How does a Bible translator know if it is a poem?
@fdb- point taken. However, I maintain that whether Paul could speak Hebrew or not, the poetic conventions of the OT (particularly those that are preserved in the LXX, such as parallelism, for example) are certain to have more of an influence on Paul's stylistic tendencies than the words of Homer.
Apr
8
comment How does a Bible translator know if it is a poem?
@fdb You misread me. I do know Greek. I do not consider myself an expert, but I have formally studied it for years -- Koine Greek, which is the language of the NT. (ML West, by contrast, studied Ancient Greek, which is as distant from Koine as Shakespeare is from modern English.) The point is that Jewish NT Christians were more likely to have derived their poetic inclinations from Hebrew psalmody than from the Illiad.
Apr
8
comment How should 2 Cor 5:10 be interpreted, in light of Isa 43:25?
@Daи- in your 1st link you explain your point more fully, so thank you. Your second link describes how to answer questions, so I don't see how it pertains here. IMO it is a disservice to the text not to recognize that it was written BY Christians and FOR Christians. That is not a statement of intolerance; I am happy for all other faiths to engage in dialog here. But the point remains: we do NOT understand the text if we don't have that initial premise. I trust you share that belief. However, I can concede that it may be useful to stop short of application, so I will attempt another edit.
Apr
8
comment How does a Bible translator know if it is a poem?
@fdb - you speak authoritatively, so I assume you have training in this matter that I have not. However, I do read Koine Greek, and this passage in the original language defintely appears (to my untrained eye) to bear a rhythmic cadence that is hard not to call poetic. Perhaps you could provide some justification for your conclusion.
Mar
30
comment How should 2 Cor 5:10 be interpreted, in light of Isa 43:25?
No @Daи, I don't want you to migrate it. I want you to explain yourself. Allow me to quote from the first line of the FAQ: "If your question is about...interpretation of a specific Bible passage... then this is the right place." That is precisely what I am doing. I am asking about the interpretation of 2Cor 5:10 in light of Isa 43:25. I've made it very clear that I am not asking about doctrine, I'm not asking about theology. I'm simply & plainly asking about an interpretation of SCRIPTURE. That's what this place used to be all about. I'm sorry to see it has drifted from its roots.
Mar
28
comment How should 2 Cor 5:10 be interpreted, in light of Isa 43:25?
Thanks @user2479. I see now, how the wording of my post/title could be construed as a doctrinal question. But as you suggested, that was not my intent. I want to know how to interpret Isaiah 43 (et.al) in light of 2 Cor 5 (and vice versa). How do these two passages inform each other? I would be happy to reword the question if that would satisfy the moderators.
Jan
21
comment Why is Isaiah 14:12-15 interpreted by some to refer to Satan?
I really must commend you again for your attention to detail in this valuable answer. Wish I could +2.
Jan
20
comment Why is Isaiah 14:12-15 interpreted by some to refer to Satan?
I might also note that according to Smith (pg 314, n.94), it was Tertullian and Gregory the Great that first introduced the connection between Lk 10:18 and Isa 14:12.
Jan
20
comment Why is Isaiah 14:12-15 interpreted by some to refer to Satan?
Fantastic research - thank you! I would only suggest that you might add to point 2 a reference to Rev. 12:8-9, which seems to contain allusions to both Isaiah and Luke.
Jan
9
comment What does it mean that “Scripture interprets Scripture”?
Pardon my severity, but I am baffled by this answer. That final sentence is one of the most egregious examples of eisegesis that I have encountered in quite a while.
Jun
6
comment Why did God “change His mind” with Balaam?
Thanks for the thoughts. As a SW dev, I particularly appreciate your programming analogy!
Mar
12
comment Per 1 Cor 10:8, when did God kill 23,000 for sexual immorality?
Recall, that for Paul, as for all other Bible students of that era, one could not easily look up a passage in a scroll like we can in a book with pages, so he was, no doubt, quoting from memory.
Jan
31
comment Are Job's friends the voice of the Accuser?
Very thought-provoking Jon. I appreciate that you are wrestling with some of the same things that I am. ("Job's friends really don't stray far from the truth.") I am especially struck by your parallel with Peter (and with Matt 4). I believe you're on to something there. (On the other hand, I'm not as comfortable with the Leviathon stuff. I'll have to give that some more thought.)
Jan
31
comment Do any Hermeneutical approaches have a specific meaning for the number 11?
Excellent observations, Jon. Particularly the keen insight that eleven often occurs due to it's relationship to 12.
Jan
29
comment Do any Hermeneutical approaches have a specific meaning for the number 11?
I am uncomfortable with this question as it is stated. It seems to presume a conclusion (about biblical numerology in general) that has not been established. I believe most (evangelical) biblical scholars are skeptical about systems that purport to find great significance in individual numbers in Scripture. I personally am wary of numerology because it is so inconclusive -- there are few accepted rules defining it. (Examples give way to counter-examples and systems proliferate.) Perhaps this question could be re-written to ask about the hermeneutical principals of numerology in general.
Jan
25
comment Are Job's friends the voice of the Accuser?
Thank you for taking the time to give such a considered and reasonable response. I had already thought that the Elihu discourse didn't really fit well into my suggested schema. But your second point about God's rebuke of Job is even more poignant in this regard. I'm still left with the frustration of not being able to really understand how to read the friends' speeches. It's like reading Ecclesiastes -- ("is the teaching of this verse something I'm supposed to accept or something to reject?") But that is a discussion for another day. Thanks again for your reply.