1,063 reputation
515
bio website linkedin.com/in/kevinmote
location United States
age
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Sep 15 at 19:54

I graduated from Washington State University in Computer Science (undergrad + masters). I've spent over 10 years in software development for a National Laboratory, a startup engineering company, and a nuclear processing plant. This has provided me with a diverse set of experiences and skills. I have worked extensively in such technologies as C++ (w/ MFC, STL, & Boost), C#, Python, and Qt. I'm also quite familiar with VB.Net, HTML/XML, SQL, Java, and Open Inventor as well as tools like Visual Studio, JIRA, and Subversion. I have a strong background in mathematics & graphics and have delved into graph & network theory, information visualization, data analytics, SCADA/HMIs, and artificial intelligence. I'm a Windows expert with Linux/Mac experience.

Also, I'm not quite as old as I look.

http://kevinmote.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevinmote


Sep
14
comment How should 2 Cor 5:10 be interpreted, in light of Isa 43:25?
Wow, @JamesShewey, you're swinging pretty far afield from the original question. The bottom line is, I dispute your suggestion that this question is anything like prooftexting. (Moreover, if your objective were to understand the meaning of the original author --as mine is-- then asking how to understand Rowling's Potter in light of Tolkien's LOTR is a perfectly appropriate literary question.)
Sep
13
comment How should 2 Cor 5:10 be interpreted, in light of Isa 43:25?
Thanks, @JamesShewey. I certainly agree that context is the primary interpretive key in understanding any given passage. But the 2nd most fundamental principal of interpretation is that "Scripture interprets Scripture". "Regula Fidei" (as it is sometimes called) is a hermeneutical tradition dating back to the Westminster Confession and before. If you consider J.I. Packer a notable authority, as I do, I recommend his discussion on the matter
Sep
10
revised What does the oil in the ten virgins parable represent?
deleted 19 characters in body
Sep
8
answered What does the oil in the ten virgins parable represent?
Sep
8
comment What does the oil in the ten virgins parable represent?
You have a number of interesting thoughts here, but your central interpretation seems to rest on the apparent parallel between the uses of the word "lamp" in Mt 25:1ff and Mt 6:22. However, entirely different Greek words are used in those two passages ( λαμπάδας vs λύχνος ), so your interpretation sounds like a bit of a stretch.
Jul
28
revised What is the Righteousness of God in Romans 1:17?
added 23 characters in body
Jul
28
answered What is the Righteousness of God in Romans 1:17?
May
12
revised Is Jesus the λόγος in Hebrews 4:12?
added 736 characters in body
May
12
answered Is Jesus the λόγος in Hebrews 4:12?
Apr
19
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
15
comment How does a Bible translator know if it is a poem?
@fdb- (Note: It is generally considered good form on this site to cite your sources, rather than referring to some purported "copious evidence".) As documented in Wikipedia the preponderance of evidence indicates "Qumran Hebrew" was spoken in 1st CE and "Mishnaic (or Rabbinic) Hebrew" was spoken for several centuries thereafter.
Apr
15
awarded  Informed
Apr
8
comment How should 2 Cor 5:10 be interpreted, in light of Isa 43:25?
@JackDouglas- That's a very helpful suggestion. Thank you! I don't have the time to make the changes right now, but I will attempt to do so.
Apr
8
comment How does a Bible translator know if it is a poem?
@fdb - By the way, evidence that demonstrates that Paul did speak fluent Hebrew is found in Acts 21:40, 22:2, and 26:14.
Apr
8
comment How does a Bible translator know if it is a poem?
@Daniel- great question! I don't believe Genesis 1 is generally regarded by translators or commentators as poetry in the strict sense (although v 27 certainly is); but it certainly contains some poetic elements, doesn't it? I'd have to do more research to know for sure.
Apr
8
comment How does a Bible translator know if it is a poem?
@fdb- point taken. However, I maintain that whether Paul could speak Hebrew or not, the poetic conventions of the OT (particularly those that are preserved in the LXX, such as parallelism, for example) are certain to have more of an influence on Paul's stylistic tendencies than the words of Homer.
Apr
8
comment How does a Bible translator know if it is a poem?
@fdb You misread me. I do know Greek. I do not consider myself an expert, but I have formally studied it for years -- Koine Greek, which is the language of the NT. (ML West, by contrast, studied Ancient Greek, which is as distant from Koine as Shakespeare is from modern English.) The point is that Jewish NT Christians were more likely to have derived their poetic inclinations from Hebrew psalmody than from the Illiad.
Apr
8
revised How should 2 Cor 5:10 be interpreted, in light of Isa 43:25?
I tried to remove the "Christian application" of this question and focus on the interp. I also removed all 2nd person plural.
Apr
8
comment How should 2 Cor 5:10 be interpreted, in light of Isa 43:25?
@Daи- in your 1st link you explain your point more fully, so thank you. Your second link describes how to answer questions, so I don't see how it pertains here. IMO it is a disservice to the text not to recognize that it was written BY Christians and FOR Christians. That is not a statement of intolerance; I am happy for all other faiths to engage in dialog here. But the point remains: we do NOT understand the text if we don't have that initial premise. I trust you share that belief. However, I can concede that it may be useful to stop short of application, so I will attempt another edit.
Apr
8
comment How does a Bible translator know if it is a poem?
@fdb - you speak authoritatively, so I assume you have training in this matter that I have not. However, I do read Koine Greek, and this passage in the original language defintely appears (to my untrained eye) to bear a rhythmic cadence that is hard not to call poetic. Perhaps you could provide some justification for your conclusion.