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Mar
6
comment What is the intended image of “pierced my hands and feet” in Psalm 22:16?
Don't get me wrong. I'm not requiring the image to be one thing or the other. I'm only asking if there is a common or typical situation that this image describes. It might not be something ordinary-ish. I'm just asking the question.
Mar
6
comment What is the intended image of “pierced my hands and feet” in Psalm 22:16?
The question is asking for a reasonable amount of speculation regarding imagery. The link is interesting, though I'm not sufficiently educated to validate or dispute the translational reasoning. Sadly, the author clearly has winning the argument more in mind than finding the truth. The thesis is essentially that the text is corrupt and unreliable.
Mar
5
comment What is the intended image of “pierced my hands and feet” in Psalm 22:16?
@Susan I did look at that question, but it was essentially asking how the verse should be translated, and the options presented still didn't answer the question I had. I'm specifically looking for the meaning of the image. A lot of David's poetry recalls battle, court intrigue, or other scenes I can place David in. I don't know how to understand this particular image.
Jan
22
comment Did Luke base the story of Paul's conversion on the ancient play, the Bacchae, by Euripides
@DickHarfield Why could Paul not have been familiar with an agrarian metaphor like this?
Jan
21
comment Did Luke base the story of Paul's conversion on the ancient play, the Bacchae, by Euripides
@DickHarfield A related question that occurs to me: Does Jesus speak to people in language that he is comfortable hearing, or does he speak to people in language that they understand? Especially after his resurrection and ascension, I would expect that Jesus' words would need have no tie to the Hebrew or Aramaic that he spoke during his earthly mission. I would expect Jesus' words to Paul to have their best expression in the language and usage that Paul understood.
Dec
30
comment Did the sister of Lazarus anoint Jesus with perfume once, or twice?
Even if the Apostle John wrote it, it was still written down after the events described. John 1 opens with a statement that would not have been understood by its author until after the resurrection. There are other examples (e.g. John 6:64) that suggest that the book was not a diary but a complete composition that took place some time after all the events recorded in it.
Dec
19
comment Did Jesus read minds or perceive them?
I would have described the difference between Jesus perceiving/knowing someone's thoughts and my perceiving their thoughts is that Jesus has an absolute certainty of understanding whereas mine always has some amount of uncertainty.
Jul
2
comment How can this contradiction in Acts be explained?
@fdb, Does ἀκούει in 1 Cor 14:2 also mean "hear" or is there some contextual difference (compared to Acts 22) that allows "understand" to be a correct rendering?
Jul
2
comment How can this contradiction in Acts be explained?
The NASB translates the portion of 9:7 as "The men who traveled with him stood speechless, hearing the voice but seeing no one." and 22:9 as "And those who were with me saw the light, to be sure, but did not understand the voice of the One who was speaking to me." (emphasis added).
Jun
16
comment Ancient Hebrew Calendar(s) and Modern Translations of “Years”
Also, I know that is Islam, there is no correlation between the calendar and seasons. Do we know that the Hebrew calendar was different?
Jun
16
comment Ancient Hebrew Calendar(s) and Modern Translations of “Years”
Any recommendation for how to reckon "years" in the text? Say I start with a known archaeological year, 576 BC. If I want to work backward using the text, what kind of adjustments might I need to make to account for the chronology in the text?
May
7
comment Is Jesus the λόγος in Hebrews 4:12?
+1 for adding some balance (Augustine).
Feb
19
comment The accuracy of Stephen's claims about persecution of the prophets
@JimThio I already said that not every prophet must have been persecuted. The text wouldn't support that claim. It was not uncommon for the prophets to face persecution (like Jeremiah, Isaiah, Elijah, etc.), though. What are you getting at?
Feb
19
comment The accuracy of Stephen's claims about persecution of the prophets
@JimThio I don't understand your point about rejection and persecution.
Feb
19
comment The accuracy of Stephen's claims about persecution of the prophets
@JimThio When I say "worst" I mean that the illustrator seems to prefer to focus on seeming contradictions in the text or in simplistic Christian ideas. Here's a good example. There could perhaps be "worse interpretations," but the intent seems to be to suggest that the Bible and/or Christianity is illogical or self-contradictory.
Feb
8
comment 1 Timothy 6:10: “For the love of money is the root of all [kinds of?] evil”
Thanks! This was very helpful.
Feb
8
comment 1 Timothy 6:10: “For the love of money is the root of all [kinds of?] evil”
Sorry. I was focusing on the "all evil" and "all kinds of evil" and didn't pay adequate attention to the first part. My question was always about "the love of money."
Feb
2
comment Who incited David to take a census and what's wrong with taking a census anyway?
It is interesting that Joab (not an exemplary moral individual) disagreed with David (2Sa 24:2) about doing this, as if he believed it was morally wrong.
Jan
15
comment Was or wasn’t Shem’s son Arphaxad born on the ark?
The 365 days comes from our reckoning of a year. I don't know how the ancients measured years, but regardless of how short/long they were, the compounded error of linking statements together is about (slightly less) 1 "year" per link.
Jan
11
comment The accuracy of Stephen's claims about persecution of the prophets
Prophets tend to get mistreated because the recipients don't like the message. What's written in the Bible is primarily about the Jews, but they weren't the only ones who (tried to) abused God's prophets (2 Ki 6:8-23).