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I am a Canadian, married with kid, and working in Hong Kong. I usually answer posts from a reformed / protestant / evangelical perspective.

People I have encountered on this site seem to be a ‘whole bunch of good people’. Even those who sharply disagree with my own point of view.

I am a huge sinner but am happy knowing God's grace will keep me in his grip.


Dec
19
comment Is the name Israel intended to be ambiguous?
@JonEricson - good pun on struggle. I think this was a fair comment so I put the horse before the cart and trimmed the cart down in size.
Dec
17
comment Why did Jesus' disciples believe in him after he turned water into wine?
@H3br3wHamm3r81 - No I do not think so. Possibly 'all' signs are meant to manifest the gospel, at least indirectly, which includes the divininity of Messiah as an integral part. However the signs of Messiah would seem to me as 'all directly' manifesting himself which must include his divinity. So yes, I would think so.
Dec
6
comment Humankind divided up among the gods?
@H3br3wHamm3r81 - Your right in a sense as at the time of Babylon the church was not yet called Israel, but the idea is not limited to any time frame as the boundaries of nations are maintained under the same principle as originally with respect to the sons of God, i.e primative pre-Israel church, then sons of Israel through that period, then technically determined to the highest benefit of the elect in the New Testament. So during all ages the boundaries are determined according to the size and scattered locations of the church. At least this is the view I am arguing here.
Nov
11
comment Was Jesus 'delivered from his fear' or 'delivered because he had fear' of God?
Thanks for the tip that might help me understand Owen's view. BTW Owen would never suggest the fear was fear of physical death but a serious reverence and nervous respect of taking the whole universe of sin upon his soul and to suffer the infinite wrath of God for it. If Jesus was merely afraid of death he would be more cowardly than a courageous martyr. No, the concept is that as he sweat drops of blood, ready to take on hell, his crying an tears were answered. Like I said both translations are easily defended theologically.
Nov
10
comment Was Jesus 'delivered from his fear' or 'delivered because he had fear' of God?
also Kittel admits this might be appropriate (i.e. fear of death) but them argues against it without fully showing the logic of those who take that side.
Nov
10
comment Was Jesus 'delivered from his fear' or 'delivered because he had fear' of God?
+1 for taking a stab at it. However I do not think this is a cut and dry easy answer as some very knowledgable theologians very familiar with the greek have translated this as not reverent fear of God but reverent fear of death. Eg. John Owen in his commentary of Hebrews. What I am looking for is the reason why they would translate it this way based on Greek secular usage of the word or maybe the particular order of the words together in the context? I do not know?
Oct
23
comment How can the flight to Egypt in Matthew 2:15 be a fulfillment of Hosea 11:1?
Fair enough. As nobody is perfectly objective it seems beneficial in this case to have our personal frameworks apparent. Cheers.
Oct
23
comment How can the flight to Egypt in Matthew 2:15 be a fulfillment of Hosea 11:1?
As you are not a Christian you might want to mention so when answering a question that seeks a Christian response, or at least when giving an answer most Christian would not find valid. This way the reader understands the framework you use to form an answer. As Christ is considered by Christians as the true Israel this explanation would not be accepted by most Christians as it was not Mathew's exegetical methods but rather the miraculous event that made the true Israel, mirror the ancient, that has caused the connection. No need to pretend the 'taking it out of its rightful context' this way.
Oct
7
comment Exodus 21:22: is “mischief” related only to the mother or to the baby, too?
That Hammburabi code is really an interesting thing to link to. I think I will have to read the whole thing.
Oct
6
comment How does a less Messianic reading of Song of Solomon interpret 5:16 “He is altogether lovely”?
That sermon by Flavel is excellent. I remember reading it about 20 years ago and still remember enjoying it.
Oct
6
comment Exodus 21:22: is “mischief” related only to the mother or to the baby, too?
@MonicaCellio - Yes I would agree that it is an interpretive translation, nevertheless, even if this was a Hellenized, somewhat Greek influenced interpretation, biasing the LXX, I do not think it is invalid. I still see the natural order of the words to refer to 'what comes out' as the subject of 'mischief or injury'. That a more obscure word for simple injury was chosen, seems to pertain to the mysterious nature of injury inside a womb. Your argument is probably along the lines of this link. chiefrabbi.org/tag/texts/#.UG97nrcayc0
Sep
23
comment Was 'σκύβαλον' (skubalon) profanity?
@Kazark - The edit was great. If I was rich I would hire you to do more of that. Actually I have other work in progress where I may seek an editor's help. Cheers.
Sep
23
comment Was 'σκύβαλον' (skubalon) profanity?
@Kazark - Sure go ahead. Your one of the persons most into the Greek.
Sep
21
comment The will of God in Ephesians 1: εὐδοκία, βουλή, θελήμα
Is it possible that the subject of predestination implies more than the usual self-possession of his own will which is having the focus of the whole series of thoughts?
Sep
14
comment When is allegorization of scripture productive?
+1 for taking a decent stab at it.
Sep
2
comment Did Abner take Saul's concubine?
@Soldarnal - Yes, when I read my original post I could understand why people were not accepting it. Cheers.
Aug
31
comment Was 'σκύβαλον' (skubalon) profanity?
@swasheck - yes I agree.
Aug
29
comment Does Jesus's change in attitude about drinking wine on the cross relate to his statement ‘It is finished’?
@MonicaCellio - I think I understand the question. bones - stretching out of his body on the cross, his bones were made prominent and so bare that People could see them and count them in his agony. bitter food - the hyssop is a bitter herb that they lifted to his mouth, along with the vinegar wine. The sponge transmitted a bit of both, for food and drink, or just symbolically given as it was raised to his mouth in contrast to what he needed and deserved.
Aug
29
comment Does Jesus's change in attitude about drinking wine on the cross relate to his statement ‘It is finished’?
@RoLaAus - I understand the objection but these things all occur moments apart, so are basically the same event. What I argue in the answer is that this absorbing contradiction in the Lord's behaviour indicates the main point. His death was primarily NOT physical but when he had died for sin, in its deeper sense...then his body also died phyically. Both deaths go tegether with this momentray pause for us to distinguish them. Thre seems to be no other explanation for the contradictary behaviour.
Aug
25
comment What is the sign of the Son of Man?
@MonikaMichael - Yes I agree. Certainly it could be physical. I am taking the verse as a transitional step from the subject of the destruction of Jerusalem, to the future when the Jews sincerely say,'Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord', then ... leading up to the final judgment, which introduces 'mourning'. If skipping the transition and holing it right up against the final judgment, it would seem a physical heavenly sign in the sky, which many good theologians take it to be.