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Jul
7
comment What does “bless” [ברך] mean?
Yet they are conscious of a char in relation to the root elements.
Jul
7
comment What does “bless” [ברך] mean?
I cannot accept the premise that Jews have less intellectual capacity than the Chinese. Why can Chinese literate people tell me meanings of words in relation root words that are hundreds or thousands of years old in their writing system. And here yoypu prefer that Jewish liberal heritage is inferior to Chinese.
Jul
7
comment What does “bless” [ברך] mean?
The question "If the LORD blesses us, does the LORD kneel to us; or if we bless the LORD, does HE kneel to us?" itself begs to sit within the meaning of the word. Otherwise, are we able to find any ostraca of each corresponding era that would provide the linguistic context?
Jul
7
comment What does “bless” [ברך] mean?
What is a "context"? Context is a very subjective concept.
Jul
7
comment What does “bless” [ברך] mean?
The question obviously cannot be answered thro plain linguistics. 2ndly, I am not Christian and therefore not a member of the Christianity forum.
Jul
4
comment Did Abraham lose track of a visitor?
The very fact that the LORD, is not, has never been, and never will be addressed as a "man" or "human".
Jul
3
comment Did Moses call himself the “most humble man on the planet”?
Bet-Peor must have been a town sitting next to a canyon - hence house of big gap. Where the canyon would have been deep and treacherous.
Apr
20
comment Psalm 23 - long long pursuit of the house of the LORD
Perhaps, "I will lengthen the days I spend in church"? "... in the temple?"
Sep
2
comment What does John 4:24 mean
I am not a christian, so I cannot tell you how to be a christian. Only that I have been to christian theological studies and have been a persistent student of christian scriptures and literature. Being Jewish, I don't quite agree with the concept in this verse, because it reduces Deut 6:5.
Jan
6
comment Red Heifer or Heifer of Soil
You are right. Still researching on the question. Will come back later to clarify. Later means, probably in 2 months'.
Dec
25
comment Red Heifer or Heifer of Soil
Certainly, I should write "cow of soil" rather than "cow of the soil". However, in English, writing "the soil" would negate the possibility of involvement of cow soil.
Dec
24
comment What is the significance of the verb בנה in Genesis 2:22?
Construct vs make.
Dec
21
comment To whom does El-Gibbor refer in Isaiah 9?
v6: That government be increased ... - A biblical exhortation that Republicans would resist vehemently.
Dec
7
comment Is the name Israel intended to be ambiguous?
I get depressed when the question is the answer itself, because it becomes revealing that there is not further/much would/could I know about the subject other than what is already provided in the question.
Nov
29
comment Differences in Genesis creation stories
He created vegetation and had them planted on Mars. Or any where besides the garden.
Nov
22
comment Is Hosea 11:1 referencing the initiation of the Exodus or the sojourn in Egypt?
Ahava is a brand of skin-care in Israel associated with the minerals of the Dead Sea en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahava. It's quite a romantic word, at least in modern Hebrew,
Nov
22
comment Was Barabbas' given name Jesus?
Maybe the Christian English Bibles should all refactor all occurrences of Jesus to Joshua.
Nov
21
comment On what basis is the name “Ephraim” given the etymology of “ash heap”?
Sub-roots is a very midrashaesque concept. Meaning they have expository and gematric value in scholarship but not much evidence linguistically. As you can see my similar attempts at hermeneutics.stackexchange.com/questions/2062/… was voted down. Perhaps, whoever voted me down should consider voting this down too - to be fair to me.
Nov
20
comment Who is the speaker in Psalms 82:6?
Jon's question on the same passage: hermeneutics.stackexchange.com/questions/2297/…
Nov
14
comment On what basis is the name “Ephraim” given the etymology of “ash heap”?
BTW, אפר in modern hebrew also mean to put on make-up. Does this come from an ancient source of painting one's face, as I think ancient Egyptians must have practiced. Therefore, the hiphil could imply a make-up artist.