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Aug
30
comment Isaiah 3:12: ‘…women rule over them.'
@BlessedGeek FWIW, I didn't intend anything theologically significant by my use of "tribe" over "people". I think "people" captures the semantics better, while "tribe" captures the grammar better. As I meant to highlight a grammatical point here, I chose "tribe". (If I had been intent on highlighting a semantic point, I agree that [collective] "people" would have been more appropriate.) So, no disagreement here. Hope that helps.
Aug
25
comment Isaiah 3:12: ‘…women rule over them.'
@BlessedGeek The trouble with using "my people" is that in English (particularly in America) it sounds plural. "My tribe" sounds singular, as it is in the Hebrew, which is what I was trying to highlight. (It would sound weird to say "His people is like a child.")
Aug
21
comment Job1:6: Who are the “sons of God”?
I'm surprised this hasn't been asked yet. Great question.
Aug
21
comment Isaiah 3:12: ‘…women rule over them.'
@Susan Isn't the "only" in that BDB entry indicating the verb is "only found in the Poel", and not "only found in Isaiah 3:12"? I don't have BDB open in front of me atm, but that's my assumption from the screenshot.
Aug
21
comment Isaiah 3:12: ‘…women rule over them.'
@Susan I wonder though... if perhaps the more standard uses of מעוֹלל didn't arise from the basic concept of "acting like a child". It is conspicuous... what do "vexing", "taking" and "poking" have in common? They are the stereotypical behaviors of children! :-) Of curiosity, does BDB give you extra-biblical data? (I'm wondering if it truly is "nowhere else attested", or if BDB is just being selective for the sake of relative brevity.)
Aug
20
comment Exoneration of future sins
@ThaddeusB I guess I'm missing the alternative. What else could he be asking?
Aug
20
comment Exoneration of future sins
@ThaddeusB FWIW, I understood the question.
Aug
20
comment Exegesis of Matthew 13
@ThaddeusB I took the question to mean "can someone please apply B. W.'s method to this passage so I can see how it works". If I'm understanding the question, it isn't seeking subjective perspectives at all.
Aug
13
comment Should Bible texts that are less clear be explained by texts that are more clear?
What would you accept as "biblical evidence"? (E.g. would illustrations work, or are you looking for explicit statements?)
Aug
12
comment Does God care for oxen?
@WoundedEgo Again, it is the ox that is laboring, and by implication, its owner. The question is not whether this concept makes sense to you; the question is how the passages would have been understood by the ancients. As Dr. Verbruggen has shown, there is ample evidence that the ancients routinely understood this to be referring to rented oxen. If you want to discuss further set up a chat room, but it sounds to me like you're on a mission to scoff at Paul's exegesis and I'm growing weary of this.
Aug
12
comment Does God care for oxen?
@SharenEayrs Read on... he clearly says in the verses that follow that he does not want their money. In context, he is simply trying to provide them an example of what it looks like to lay aside your rights in order to keep your brother from stumbling.
Aug
12
comment Does God care for oxen?
@WoundedEgo It sounds like you already had your mind made up before asking the question. Shame...
Aug
12
comment Happy or blessed in the Psalms?
The question was about Ashrey, not Asher. Similar consonants does not make them identical words! Also, masculine plural construct =/= participle!
Aug
11
comment Does God care for oxen?
@WoundedEgo Except that Paul says in 1 Cor. that it wasn't originally about being nice to oxen, so you'd have to either say Paul wasn't very experienced at exegesis (and good luck supporting that) or you'd have to explain Paul's exegesis, and respond adequately to Jan's top-notch research.
Aug
11
comment Does God care for oxen?
@SharenEayrs It's a more polite way of saying "swindle", " use", and clearer phrases I probably shouldn't repeat on this site. To state it positively, "compensate people for the services they render you." Paul was working for them, serving them in ministry, and yet they provided him no compensation. They were like a man who rents his neighbor's ox and then deprives it of food as it labors, and then returns it weak and hungry.
Aug
11
comment What does “image” in Genesis 1:26-27 mean?
Is the Greek word used in Mark 12 the same Greek word used to translate Gen. 1:26 in the LXX and NT references?
Aug
11
comment Does God care for oxen?
@WoundedEgo It is not the renter "plowing" but the ox, and by implication, its owner. I'm not sure what you meant by "the ox expects compensation". You think Paul's trying to say that an ox is consciously working because he expects to receive fair payment for his labor? This seems to me to miss the point of both passages completely.
Aug
10
comment What is the meaning of “husband of one wife” in 1 Timothy 3:2?
There is another prominent interpretation: that the elder must be "a one-woman man", meaning faithful to his wife in character and deed. Iirc, this comes from a parallel statement that only widows who were " a one-man woman" should be supported by the church.
Aug
10
comment In the gospels, why does Jesus sometimes tell the people not to tell anyone after he has performed a miracle?
This answer adds a bit more backing to Mike's comment: (Click here)
Jul
11
comment Is 'all-things' literally including any conceivable thing in Rom 8:28?
"When you dive into the context of the passage, you see why Paul writes what he writes" ...please show us what you mean. On this site we're looking for more than unsupported assertions; we want you to show us your work and help us follow your train of thought to your conclusion.