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bio website tkos.co.il
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visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Nov 13 '12 at 18:01

Software and hardware development, primarily for embedded Linux, FreeRTOS and Open Source technologies


Nov
13
comment What and where is the Kerith ravine?
Another question or hint - the story is a bit more complex that you have stated so far - Obadiah shows that not all Israel followed Baal, in fact, in Obadiah, Ahab chose a loyal servant of the LORD to run his palace, a person who secretly protected 100 prophets of the LORD in times of great danger, some of which was caused by Elijah's actions. What does that appointment say about Ahab? What is Kings saying about Elijah vs Obadiah and Elijah vs Moses? Is Kings making a comparson?
Nov
12
comment What and where is the Kerith ravine?
Compare Obadiah's response to the crisis with that of Elijah's, higlighted by the meeting between the two men. What is I Kings trying to tell us about these two ways of dealing with the challenges?
Nov
12
comment What and where is the Kerith ravine?
In the parallels that Kings draws between Elijah and Moses that you mention, how does Elijah come out in comparison with Moses? What is the implication of God feeding Israel in the wilderness manna versus feeding Elijah by means of an unclean fowl in the revine of "cutting off"? How does Elijah compare with Obadiah in the continuation of the story?
Nov
12
comment What and where is the Kerith ravine?
Have you considered the possibility that the author of Kings might not be refering to a geographical location? How is the word "cherith" used in other places in this chapter? If Elijah is a prophet, why should he need to be placed at God's mercy? What is this supposed to teach him that he wouldn't already know?
Nov
2
comment What was Noah thinking when he sent a raven from the ark?
+1 for finding this in Luther.
Oct
29
comment Isaiah 1:18 white washing the scarlet?
@BlessedGeek Done
Oct
28
comment Isaiah 1:18 white washing the scarlet?
@BlessedGeek Its not that sins contain anything pure, they definitely do not. It's that even if their guilt looks as permanent as scarlet dye, it can be removed. The cleverness of the metaphor is that it uses something positive to allude to something very very negative, sins. This language is intended to re-kindle faith. Certainly it's better to be whole in the first place rather than have to go through the cycle of punishment and repentance. Of course, some of us seek punishment ;-) but that is not what the prophet is talking about in this verse.
Oct
24
comment How can the flight to Egypt in Matthew 2:15 be a fulfillment of Hosea 11:1?
@livingparadox I wouldn't call it weak reasoning in the context is the accepted hermeneutics of the time. In fact, its pretty strong for this type of claim.
Oct
23
comment How can the flight to Egypt in Matthew 2:15 be a fulfillment of Hosea 11:1?
@Mike I do my best to answer questions on this site based on my understanding of the intent of the author of the text, based on my knowledge of history, similar texts, and the languages of the period, whether or not I sympathise with the author of the text. My assumption is that no one posting a question on this site is looking for a response designed to support any particular theological position but is trying to understand the intent of the original author in his historical context.
Oct
23
comment What do the days of Obadyahu's youth concern us?
+1, but specifically why "since my youth"? Wouldn't "I am a worshipper of the LORD" be sufficient? What does the "youth" add here that warrants mention?
Oct
21
comment Did Moses have an Egyptian name?
abarim-publications.com/Meaning/Moses.html#.UIQ7MHbk6qk
Oct
21
comment Did Moses have an Egyptian name?
"Moses" is his Egyptian name. The "midrash shem" noted in 2:10 is an apologetic for this non-Hebrew name.
Oct
8
comment What about the noncanonical books quoted in Jude?
I am not sure that there is a basis to think that the concept of canon was well formed at the time of the writing of Jude. Folks quoted writings that were accepted as authoritative at the time of their writing. The author of Jude either accepted these writings as authoritative or did not but needed to address an audience that did accept them. The question, both in OT and post OT about what to do with references and quotes of material that is no longer extant or is, but no longer accepted as canonical is in some sense not hermeneutical. We can only deal with the texts that we have at this date.
Oct
8
comment What about the noncanonical books quoted in Jude?
In what sense is this question hermeneutical rather than doctrinal?
Oct
3
comment Satan: Stumbling Block or Accuser?
@BlessedGeek: The more you learn the language of the manuscripts and the more you study the texts in manuscript form, the more independent you can be of ad hominem worries and can cite good explanations when you find them, regardless of the persuasion of the writer. In this case, I found a pretty good English explanation of the words "set", "satan", "sitnah", with their OT usage davka on an accessible Christian site.
Oct
1
comment Does Romans 13:8 include a prohibition of taking loans?
@BlessedGeek: Well, this isn't exactly what I had in mind. Paul lived in tumultuous times that were hard to comprehend and had himself witnessed miracles. He was by all accounts a responsible leader.
Sep
30
comment Satan: Stumbling Block or Accuser?
@Kazark The identification of the particular snake in the creation story of Genesis is part of the post OT personification of Satan, a back-reading into the text from a later time. BTW, there is another snake, made of copper, that Moses made that is identified as a means of performing healing miracles for the Israelites.
Sep
25
comment Why is Israel referred to with a male pronoun in Jeremiah 31:10?
Jer 31:9 in the Mesorah, start of the open "parashah". The OP question is probably why "he/him" and not "them", referring to the people of Israel, especially as a flock is in general plural. Answer is that "Israel" here is the a.k.a of the patriarch Jacob, who represents the people of Israel in prophetic writing, plus OT Hebrew in general does not stand on consistency of person or number so that he/flock does not sound odd in OT Hebrew. As an aside, there is some room to translate יקבצנו as "collect them", because of the diacritic.
Sep
15
comment Can we determine the language(s) the author of Hebrews read from the list of Judges?
The context of I Sam 12:11 is the time of the kingdom of Saul, so David is not yet in the list.
Sep
8
comment Does Paul see baptism as symbolic or as instrumental?
Remember Paul's background as a devout Pharisee. Baptism, or more properly "tvila", had a precise technical meaning, was a sine qua non for conversion to Judaism, and was performed on the body of the deceased prior to burial. It is unlikely that he meant baptism in a symbolic sense.