306 reputation
15
bio website false0start.blogspot.com
location Pittsburgh, PA
age 29
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Mar 10 '12 at 18:38

I'm an Orthodox Christian, a gamer, a reader, a writer.

I'm married and have one cat. As soon as we move, I see several dogs in my future.

I love learning. I love biblical studies and foreign languages and many other things that hold my attention for brief spans of time.

This is the Biblical Hermeneutics specific section of my bio: As stated above, I am an Orthodox Christian and so I approach (insofar as I am able) the study of the Scriptures from that vantage. I don't believe biblical studies can be done in a vacuum and so I do not even attempt to do so.

Among other things that means: 1.) I read the Scriptures christologically. 2.) I prefer the Septuagint reading above Masoretic readings. 3.) I interpret the Scriptures in line with the Tradition of the Orthodox Church as far as I may. This has many similarities to what is known as "historical theology" but does diverge widely from other flavors of Christianity that claim the same things.


Feb
28
awarded  Yearling
Mar
2
comment Where did Samuel come from when he was summoned by the Medium of En-dor?
It is the land of shadow where all the departed souls go. It is analogous to the Greek conception of Hades (the Septuagint simply substitutes the word "Hades" for "Sheol"). It was initially a place where all went and was separated in Second Temple Judaism into two parts, one for the righteous and one for sinners. Hence NT references to the Bosom of Abraham as in the parable of the rich man and Lazarus.
Mar
2
revised What does Exodus 26:27 say?
Attempted to clarify the question.
Mar
2
comment What does Exodus 26:27 say?
Thanks. I was actually more struck by the phrase "toward the sea" since it is the most drastic departure from the other translations. I'll edit the question to reflect that.
Mar
2
comment Where did Samuel come from when he was summoned by the Medium of En-dor?
"The Tanakh has nothing specific to say about what happens to people after they die." Doesn't this statement sort of fly in the face of the idea of Sheol littered throughout the Hebrew Scriptures as the place of the dead?
Mar
2
awarded  Student
Mar
2
revised What does Exodus 26:27 say?
Fixed a spelling error.
Mar
2
asked What does Exodus 26:27 say?
Feb
29
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
29
comment Does the original Hebrew support the NLT of Genesis 6:3?
Right. I meant my comment to encapsulate that but the point remains that this statement is speaking of man's lifespan and it is fulfilled by the end of the Pentateuch.
Feb
29
comment Does the original Hebrew support the NLT of Genesis 6:3?
I believe it is meant as a limit to man's life span. It is significant that men live for shorter and shorter periods of time and the close of the Torah is with Moses's death at 120 years old.
Feb
29
comment What led to the division of Ezra-Nehemiah?
Thanks. :) I can't recommend that podcast enough. It is Orthodox in perspective but she speaks broadly enough so that anyone can appreciate it.
Feb
28
awarded  Editor
Feb
28
revised What led to the division of Ezra-Nehemiah?
Fixed my citation.
Feb
28
awarded  Supporter
Feb
28
comment What led to the division of Ezra-Nehemiah?
I figured as much. I'll see if I can make time to listen to them today. The problem is that, as much as I love it, Dr. Constantinou's show is a bit disorganized.
Feb
28
awarded  Teacher
Feb
28
answered What led to the division of Ezra-Nehemiah?