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seen Aug 6 at 13:06

I like translating the Hebrew of the Bible, and I think it can be done accurately and honestly, better than extant translations, so long as you ignore the theologically minded people completely. They generally are not honest enough, you can't trust anything they say.


Apr
15
comment How to interpret Genesis 25:1-2?
@JackDouglas: It's a bunch of verses. 16:15 says Ishmael is born when Abram is 86. 17:1 says he becomes "Abraham" at 99, and the remainder of the chapter details his amusement at the idea of Isaac's birth to a centenarian. 17:18, when God says Abraham will have a son, says "would that Ishmael would live in your presence" so that his son would be a believer (no mention of other sons, Jokshan, Zimran, Medan, Midian, Ishbak, or Shuah). 17:26 says "on that day, Abraham and Ishmael his son were circumcized. 21:8, when Isaac and Ishmael are playing, Sarah says to evict Ishmael (not others).
Apr
14
answered How to interpret Genesis 25:1-2?
Apr
14
comment How to interpret Genesis 25:1-2?
The problem with this thesis is that it is explicitly stated that Abraham had Isaac at 99, and that he was his first son other than Ishmael.
Apr
13
comment Did women contribute to the temple in exodus 35:22?
@MonicaCellio: that's reasonable, but prepositions are always weird "why do I always put up with you?" (why with?) "I'm screaming at you while talking to you" (etc, etc), you just have to feel it. This is not how you would say "on behalf of the women" in mod. Heb. (you would say "be'ad hanashim"), and AFAIK "be'ad" is the same in Bible Heb., but this interpretation might be accurate. But this also suggests a redaction, since it is much more natural to think that the women brought the stuff themselves. It might also be an illiterate redaction, by someone who no longer spoke Hebrew natively.
Apr
12
revised Is there a modern English translation of the Bible that uses the second-person plural pronoun?
clarify
Apr
12
comment Does Exodus 22:28 call for child sacrifice?
yes, it is interesting. I'll need to read further and see for myself before accepting, tho.
Apr
12
accepted What does Cain say to Abel in Genesis 4:8?
Apr
12
comment What does Cain say to Abel in Genesis 4:8?
@JackDouglas: You're right, I was far overestimating the precision, because on what I thought was a dual grammar error, where there is only one grammar error. I had gotten too used to seeing it as an obvious redaction.
Apr
12
comment What does Cain say to Abel in Genesis 4:8?
You are completely right, and I deleted my comments that claim that "the field" is likely to require a field referent. I was just not thinking, and I apologize.
Apr
12
revised What does Cain say to Abel in Genesis 4:8?
reevaluate in light of Monica Cellio's comments
Apr
12
comment What does Cain say to Abel in Genesis 4:8?
@JonEricson: There is no contradiction with the different versions.
Apr
12
comment What does Cain say to Abel in Genesis 4:8?
It's not just septuagint, but also Samaritan, and Samaritan provides the Hebrew--- nelecha ha-sadeh. I can't doubt that this elegant phrase was there, it's Masoretic that's corrupted. Also, it's a nice example of J's beautiful style, she is terrific with literary pacing.
Apr
12
comment Does the original Hebrew support the NLT of Genesis 6:3?
One of the most interesting aspects of this verse is that it is out of place in the narrative, it is one of the places where you could have an interpolation. But I don't see any possible motivation for anyone to interpolate this, other than it looks like an interpolation. NLT is not very good in keeping faithful nuance of meaning--- it is a crude translation IMO.
Apr
12
accepted Is tola'at sheni a knit?
Apr
12
comment Is tola'at sheni a knit?
Ok, I'll go along with this, although I am really surprised. Accept.
Apr
12
comment What does Cain say to Abel in Genesis 4:8?
@MonicaCellio: No, I was totally wrong, you were right, it just took me a few hours to appreciate it--- it is natural in modern and ancient Hebrew both, just as it is in English. I was thrown off by the fact that I already expected a "field" in the missing dialog. I should readjust my probabilities then, but the first grammar error is real.
Apr
12
comment Did women contribute to the temple in exodus 35:22?
@MonicaCellio: But in "Anashim 'al ha-nashim", it can't mean both, since there is a specific nashim in there.
Apr
12
comment What does Cain say to Abel in Genesis 4:8?
@MonicaCellio: That's a Hebrew style phrase--- "hineh to'eh ba'sadeh"(here is a lost fellow in the field"), "im tizaher ba'cvish"(If you are careful on the road), "nagi'a ba-zman" (we will arive in (the)time). It sometimes works in English too, like the first two examples, although a little more in Hebrew. If you choose to interpret "ve-cshehayu ba-sadeh" in this way, it does become grammatical, although unnatural (I wouldn't have read it this way except for your prompting--- it's like a computer parsing--- surprising--- but ok). I agree that this does render the second half grammatical.
Apr
12
comment Did women contribute to the temple in exodus 35:22?
chech(clasp) I am not sure of gender, while taba'at (ring) appears with a male owner in Genesis (in the prostitution chapter where somebody's wife conceives. But in context, it seems like a female donation is assigned unnaturally to male donors.
Apr
12
comment Did women contribute to the temple in exodus 35:22?
Oh--- yes you are right--- the matching is mixed gender, but the binding is to "anashim". But the "anashim" are specifically "'al hanashim", they are the ones doing the giving, and the matching of adjective is to the masculine subject, not to the ostensibly feminine donors. Some interpret "'al hanashim" to mean that the women wear actually wearing these items (this is a possible reading), but I tend to see it as a control issue--- the men decided to do the donation, not the women. Either reading leaves the same question. The nezem and cumaz are always female associated--- no males wear them.