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I like translating the Hebrew of the Bible, and I think it can be done accurately and honestly, better than extant translations, so long as you ignore the theologically minded people completely. They generally are not honest enough, you can't trust anything they say.


Apr
23
comment Who was Moses supposed to say sent him, “Ehieh” or “Yahweh”
Except "Ehieh" is not "hayah", so the difference is much bigger than waw to jud.
Apr
3
comment What else can “Fifteen cubits from above” in Gen 7:20 mean?
-1: The original Hebrew had no dots at all, these were added in the Middle ages. The word "Milema'la" is not obscure, and no other construction of this form has any special thing associated with it. The construction is straightforward, and it doesn't seem like a contraction of "min lema'la" which is what is implied by this answer, which doesn't even sound grammatical and certainly doesn't appear anywhere.
Mar
12
accepted Does Exodus 22:28 call for child sacrifice?
Mar
11
revised Does Exodus 22:28 call for child sacrifice?
retitle
Mar
11
suggested rejected edit on What does it mean to be a Nazirite?
Mar
11
awarded  Cleanup
Mar
11
revised Does Exodus 22:28 call for child sacrifice?
rolled back to a previous revision
Mar
1
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
27
comment Does Exodus 22:28 call for child sacrifice?
@warren: it wasn't a misnote--- I meant Reuben. I was thinking of the story of Reuben sleeping with Jacob's concubine, the thing that makes him "unstable as water" and unsuitable for an inheritance. This is over-masculinity. The Judah was a brain-glitch, I know the stories.
Feb
19
awarded  Yearling
Nov
16
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
12
awarded  Revival
Nov
10
comment Who was Moses supposed to say sent him, “Ehieh” or “Yahweh”
Oh, I see! You think the "post-hoc" etymological justification for the name is being done here by the same author! It's the redactor, the person who put the J/E together this way, who is making the post-hoc justification by the juxtaposition, neither J nor E gives an etymology for Yahweh, and the etymology is implicit, not parallel to neither J nor E stuff (although it's in a similar spirit). This answer is incorrect--- the "J part" and the "E part" are in different voices, the seam is obvious and clunky, and this is the first place where they start to agree on the name of God.
Nov
9
comment Who was Moses supposed to say sent him, “Ehieh” or “Yahweh”
I agree, it's like the other stretchy folk-etymologies, but this one is not so ridiculous (neither is noach), because "Yahweh" sort of sounds like a nonexistent conjugation of to be, which mangles the future and past tense. But they don't sound very much alike, you are right. I have already explained the main point, that it is one more place that you can clearly see the JE authorial division in Genesis/Exodus.
Nov
4
answered Did Moses have an Egyptian name?
Nov
4
comment Did Moses have an Egyptian name?
The active is "Moshet", not "Moshe". The etymology is totally wrong.
Nov
4
answered Why did Abel keep flocks if man wasn't supposed to eat flesh til after the Flood?
Nov
4
comment How different is Biblical Hebrew from modern Hebrew?
The problem with this answer is that it takes a native Hebrew speaker about ten seconds to get used to the "vav ha-hipuch" (which just sounds bombastic and snobby) and the shifted meaning of "liglosh" (which is manifestly obvious--- it clearly means spreading out, not skiing). The analogy to Shakespeare's English is perfect, one does not make mistakes more than a handful of times (which are easy to fix, since there is plenty of commentary), and it is ridiculous to insinuate otherwise. All Israelis are forced to read the Bible in school at least, and there is no chance of major confusion.
Nov
4
answered What was Noah thinking when he sent a raven from the ark?
Nov
3
comment Why does God say he only revealed his name, Yahweh, to Moses?
@FrankLuke: I do not cite authority to support positions, I also don't read books (other than original sources), so my knowledge is all self-derived. This means I make an occasional mistake, but not very often, and much less than the phony-baloney so-called experts. Sorry to not be able to oblige.