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seen Nov 19 at 22:36

I like translating the Hebrew of the Bible, and I think it can be done accurately and honestly, better than extant translations, so long as you ignore the theologically minded people completely. They generally are not honest enough, you can't trust anything they say.


Apr
4
comment What Scriptures is Paul referring to in 1 Cor 15:4
There is no quotation from the old testament that he would die for ones sins either. Why are we to assume that Paul is actually quoting scripture, as opposed to his own esoteric interpretation? It sounds like Paul is quoting some documents relating to Christ, like an early gospel document.
Apr
3
answered What does “Jealous” mean in Exodus 34:14?
Apr
3
comment Is there any scriptural warrant for the literalist approach to scripture?
How is this a hermeneutics question and not a theological question? Isn't hermeneutics supposed to focus on the text, not on the religious interpretation, or am I misunderstanding?
Apr
1
comment What is Shesh Mashzar?
I am aware that "silk" is not the best interpretation considering that it is used for drapes, but perhaps a finely woven canvas? I just want an idea of what this could be.
Apr
1
comment Is El-Shaddai “Sky God” where Sky==Breasts?
+1 for the link, but I am looking for a source (or a refutation) of the idea that the sky is the breasts and the abyss is the womb of the universe conceived as an enormous woman (Mother-Earth indeed!). This is the interpretation I eventually settled on, although it isn't perfect, but I don't see it anywhere.
Apr
1
comment Is El-Shaddai “Sky God” where Sky==Breasts?
I can summarize it: points 1+2 give two different "She-dai" interpretations as in "God that is sufficient", this is ridiculously anachronistic Hebrew, and wrong pronounciation, also obviously, terribly, wrong. 3 is "shadad" which is a stretch, plunder-God, stretch because two "d"s. 4 says "shaddai" comes from breast, but it does not link it up to a cosmology which identifies the sky with breasts and the Abyss with a womb. Religious sources won't do that, because it is a flat-Earth cosmology, and they don't usually want to treat Genesis as a flat-Earth document.
Apr
1
comment Is El-Shaddai “Sky God” where Sky==Breasts?
First, +1, because the Wikisource translation was totally missing the clause: וְאֵת שַׁדַּי וִיבָרְכֶךָּ . It didn't interpret it as anything--- it just omitted these three words, that was my fault, and I went back and retranslated these verses. Thanks. I am well aware of the academic interpretations, I don't buy them. My question was about the fertility symbol interpretations
Apr
1
revised Is El-Shaddai “Sky God” where Sky==Breasts?
fix translation
Apr
1
awarded  Commentator
Apr
1
comment Is El-Shaddai “Sky God” where Sky==Breasts?
The Rabbinical commentary that it is "el-she-dai" as in "God that is sufficient" is ridiculous. First, it is using "she-dai" in a different pronounciation, not "sha-dai", second, it is obviously a much later Hebrew construction, like in a Haggadah, not like the Hebrew of Genesis. The interpretation is as silly as saying that when Jesus said "I am the son of man", he was saying "I am the son of ... , MAN!" because someone stepped on his toe as he was saying it. This kind of stuff is why I find it difficult to take Rabbinical sources seriously. The root is obviously breast, not sufficiency.
Apr
1
comment Is El-Shaddai “Sky God” where Sky==Breasts?
The word "rovetz" is not quite reclining, it is a prone position, which is not necessarily lying down--- it's more like crouching. Squatting though has a similar "dirty" connotation, and is closer to the meaning--- something rovetz is something kind of that you don't want to be around, like the sins that is rovetz at the door for Cain. I would not translate it as "lying down", perhaps "waiting prone", but this has connotation of inaction. It's more like "crouching ready", and "squat" I find to have similar connotations. It's a judgement call, I agree.
Apr
1
comment What else can “Fifteen cubits from above” in Gen 7:20 mean?
@MonicaCellio: "lema'la" means "to up-there", "... mi-le-ma'la" means "(fifteen cubits from) up there". It can also mean "from above" as in "I saw him from above". Your construction "Mi-ma'la" I am not familiar with, and "Ma'la" is not a word AFAIK, the word "ma'aleh" is a lifting root, meaning "lifts", as in "he lifts". The first lamed just makes it a noun, so that you can use it as a noun. The lamed usually means "to" but in this case "le-ma'la" is just a noun for "up-there".
Mar
31
answered Does Genesis's creation account depict creation “ex nihilo”?
Mar
31
asked Is tola'at sheni a knit?
Mar
31
revised What is Shesh Mashzar?
clarify
Mar
31
asked What is Shesh Mashzar?
Mar
31
awarded  Student
Mar
31
asked Is El-Shaddai “Sky God” where Sky==Breasts?
Mar
31
asked What else can “Fifteen cubits from above” in Gen 7:20 mean?
Mar
31
comment How does the Noah's Ark narrative relate to the Gilgamesh flood account?
"The event"? What event? It seems as if this answer is taking the flood as an actual event. How can you do this and study the text? This is not a reasonable answer.