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I like translating the Hebrew of the Bible, and I think it can be done accurately and honestly, better than extant translations, so long as you ignore the theologically minded people completely. They generally are not honest enough, you can't trust anything they say.


Apr
1
revised Is El-Shaddai “Sky God” where Sky==Breasts?
fix translation
Apr
1
awarded  Commentator
Apr
1
comment Is El-Shaddai “Sky God” where Sky==Breasts?
The Rabbinical commentary that it is "el-she-dai" as in "God that is sufficient" is ridiculous. First, it is using "she-dai" in a different pronounciation, not "sha-dai", second, it is obviously a much later Hebrew construction, like in a Haggadah, not like the Hebrew of Genesis. The interpretation is as silly as saying that when Jesus said "I am the son of man", he was saying "I am the son of ... , MAN!" because someone stepped on his toe as he was saying it. This kind of stuff is why I find it difficult to take Rabbinical sources seriously. The root is obviously breast, not sufficiency.
Apr
1
comment Is El-Shaddai “Sky God” where Sky==Breasts?
The word "rovetz" is not quite reclining, it is a prone position, which is not necessarily lying down--- it's more like crouching. Squatting though has a similar "dirty" connotation, and is closer to the meaning--- something rovetz is something kind of that you don't want to be around, like the sins that is rovetz at the door for Cain. I would not translate it as "lying down", perhaps "waiting prone", but this has connotation of inaction. It's more like "crouching ready", and "squat" I find to have similar connotations. It's a judgement call, I agree.
Apr
1
comment What else can “Fifteen cubits from above” in Gen 7:20 mean?
@MonicaCellio: "lema'la" means "to up-there", "... mi-le-ma'la" means "(fifteen cubits from) up there". It can also mean "from above" as in "I saw him from above". Your construction "Mi-ma'la" I am not familiar with, and "Ma'la" is not a word AFAIK, the word "ma'aleh" is a lifting root, meaning "lifts", as in "he lifts". The first lamed just makes it a noun, so that you can use it as a noun. The lamed usually means "to" but in this case "le-ma'la" is just a noun for "up-there".
Mar
31
answered Does Genesis's creation account depict creation “ex nihilo”?
Mar
31
asked Is tola'at sheni a knit?
Mar
31
revised What is Shesh Mashzar?
clarify
Mar
31
asked What is Shesh Mashzar?
Mar
31
awarded  Student
Mar
31
asked Is El-Shaddai “Sky God” where Sky==Breasts?
Mar
31
asked What else can “Fifteen cubits from above” in Gen 7:20 mean?
Mar
31
comment How does the Noah's Ark narrative relate to the Gilgamesh flood account?
"The event"? What event? It seems as if this answer is taking the flood as an actual event. How can you do this and study the text? This is not a reasonable answer.
Mar
31
comment Why does David mourn the death of his adult son Absalom and not the death of his baby son?
@JonEricson: I thought the concept of heaven didn't appear until at least the Hellenistic era, perhaps due to the influence of Plato. Is it present in Jewish writings of the Babylonian captivity?
Mar
31
revised What is the significance of Moses being called a “bridegroom of blood?”
fmt
Mar
31
answered Did Ruth uncover Boaz' feet, or something else?
Mar
31
answered What is the significance of Moses being called a “bridegroom of blood?”
Feb
22
awarded  Supporter
Feb
20
comment How should the first line of Judges 5:2 be translated?
@Amichai: the (R)'s and (S)'s are cantillation marks of unknown function in the Hebrew text. I suppose the "S" is for "Selah", which is believed to mean pause, and I am guessing that the R means something like "emphatic" or "low-tone", or something. It's a guide for singing or chanting the verses. I tried to place them in the closest corresponding location, but sometimes it required judgement calls.
Feb
20
awarded  Editor