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Dec
14
revised What does the prohibition against women speaking in church in 1 Corinthians 14:34-35 mean?
minor edits
Dec
14
comment Is LXX “Enoch pleased God” a reasonable idiomatic translation of Hebrew “Enoch walked with God”?
This is no longer 'not an answer' by our site's standards given the most recent edit. I've thus undeleted it.
Dec
11
comment What is being “judged” in 2 Corinthians 5:10?
As an example, it could be focused on the Apocalypse passage, asking if Paul's letter to the Corinthians may have been a source text for the idea of judgment before a throne (and if not, where the idea came from - but even a small amount of research into Greco-Roman culture would show that a 'judgment seat' was a standard component of their legal system). But the second question shows that the OP's intent is inherently to apply these texts to Christian theology, and thus would be better asked elsewhere.
Dec
11
comment What is being “judged” in 2 Corinthians 5:10?
@Tau it could certainly be rewritten to focus on a linguistic connection between the texts, i.e. by identifying language in the Greek text that is similar between the two and asking where the concept came from or if they were referring to the same thing. But the modern Christian theological connection would be off topic (but not early apocalyptic theological beliefs held by the original authors - which would be squarely on topic). The problem is that requires considerably more research effort, knowledge of the original languages, etc. None of which have been provided.
Dec
11
comment What is being “judged” in 2 Corinthians 5:10?
This question asks about two different texts by two different authors written at different times and makes the assumption that they are speaking about the same event. The last question about how many times Jesus sits down to judge is 'searching for texts', which is strictly off topic here. You may want to consider asking on Christianity. If you wish to ask about either text here, that is fine, but it would need to be focused on a single text and not try to relate the two.
Dec
11
comment What is being “judged” in 2 Corinthians 5:10?
Welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics Stack Exchange! Be sure to take our site tour to learn more about us. We're a little different from other sites. Please keep in mind that this is not a Christian site. Be sure to check out what makes us different from other sites that study the Bible.
Dec
11
reviewed Close What is being “judged” in 2 Corinthians 5:10?
Dec
11
comment We shall be like him because we shall see him as he is?
@Hello please keep comments focused on issues with the post. Keep in mind this is not a Christian site. Please do not use comments as a platform for your beliefs.
Dec
11
comment Is there a case to be made that Luke wrote the book of Hebrews?
Welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics Stack Exchange! Be sure to take our site tour to learn more about us. We're a little different from other sites. Could you expand this more, citing specifically where in Tertullian's writings you got that quote, and present more evidence for your claims of 'internal considerations'? As it stands, this doesn't show its work, which is a requirement.
Dec
11
reviewed Approve Interpretation of Genesis 1:26?
Dec
11
reviewed Reject and Edit What is the difference between “eretz” and “adamah” in Gen 2:6?
Dec
11
revised What is the difference between “eretz” and “adamah” in Gen 2:6?
added 1 character in body
Dec
11
reviewed Approve What is the difference between “eretz” and “adamah” in Gen 2:6?
Dec
10
revised What is the difference between “eretz” and “adamah” in Gen 2:6?
cleaned up
Dec
10
revised What is the difference between “eretz” and “adamah” in Gen 2:6?
removed duplicate from another question
Dec
10
answered What is the difference between “eretz” and “adamah” in Gen 2:6?
Dec
7
comment What is Satan's relationship with God?
This probably belongs on C.SE. However, it could be edited to focus on the understanding of the text and not Absolute Truth or modern religious theology (i.e. it tells us nothing about Satan's relationship with God, but it can tell us a lot about how ancient Near Eastern literature viewed the relationship amongst divine entities, particularly the 'heavenly court' notion).
Dec
5
comment What historical reasons resulted in Revelation being included in most Christian canons?
@Tau I see your point, and with the latest edit, you gladly have my +1 :) - also, did you know Revelation is still not read aloud in Eastern Christian churches?
Dec
4
comment What historical reasons resulted in Revelation being included in most Christian canons?
I'm torn on this, I want to upvote it and downvote it at the same time! I think it's a good answer, right up until the last statement: "The argument of canonicity of Revelations did not really come into play until Preterism, and the advent of Modern Critical scholarship made it an issue in the 17th and 18th centuries." You've offered no support for this statement, and from my historical readings, it's false. There was considerable controversy about the book, so much so that it was not read in the early churches, thought to be a Montanist work by some (and still rejected by Nestorians).
Dec
3
reviewed Reject Double-doubt about Numbers 12:6-8, the Speaker cannot be (or include) Jesus. (so no Trinity here)