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Oct
20
comment Did Jesus promise literal food and clothing in Matthew 6:33?
I've edited this question to focus it on the interpretation of the passage in its original context and to its original audience. This is not the site to deal with its application to religious groups today - that is reserved for Christianity or other sites.
Oct
20
comment Did Jesus promise literal food and clothing in Matthew 6:33?
Welcome to BH.SE! Please take our site tour. and check out what makes us different from other sites that study the Bible. We don't do 'Bible study'—we study the Bible. That means we stop short of application when answering questions about the Bible (which means we don't fully exegete the text in the religious sense of the practice). Questions should be focused solely on the text and not primarily on those things to which the text applies.
Oct
20
revised Did Jesus promise literal food and clothing in Matthew 6:33?
focused on original context
Oct
20
comment Omission of 'fasting' in Mark 9:29
Pardon my nitpicky edit, I know you linked to the other posts initially, but I added them in context also :P (this is an excellent answer, +1)
Oct
20
revised Omission of 'fasting' in Mark 9:29
added links to referenced answers
Oct
20
comment Omission of 'fasting' in Mark 9:29
@JackDouglas I was literally about to comment on this. This has attracted three excellent answers.
Oct
20
revised Which experts believe Paul “lost” his arguments in 1st Corinthians?
added 8 characters in body
Oct
20
answered Which experts believe Paul “lost” his arguments in 1st Corinthians?
Oct
20
comment Omission of 'fasting' in Mark 9:29
although not precisely what you're looking for, you may find this helpful. And for those of us with access to academic libraries, this is highly recommended. +1
Oct
20
comment What is Apostle Paul's “thorn in the flesh”?
Hey Brian, could you cite any of these 'many commentators'? We prefer that answers show their work, and citations are part of that when claims like this are made (we'd like them to be supported). It's a good answer but could benefit strongly from citing sources. Thanks!
Oct
20
revised What is Apostle Paul's “thorn in the flesh”?
removed prescriptive content
Oct
20
comment What is Apostle Paul's “thorn in the flesh”?
Please don't "preach" at readers. Instead, describe your perspective without prescribing it. We're looking for lectures rather than sermons. Please keep in mind that not all of your readers here are Christians. I've removed the prescriptive content.
Oct
20
revised What is Apostle Paul's “thorn in the flesh”?
added 3 characters in body
Oct
17
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
16
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
3
reviewed Reviewed What is the meaning behind the parable of Children in the Marketplace in Luke 7:31-35?
Oct
3
comment What is the meaning behind the parable of Children in the Marketplace in Luke 7:31-35?
Welcome to BH.SE! Please take our site tour. and check out what makes us different from other sites that study the Bible. Could you elaborate more on how you came to the conclusion Jesus is quoting Aesop's fables? Ideally cite some scholars who think so (we are interested in what experts think). Please don't just tell us what you know, tell us how you know it.
Oct
2
comment What does the word 'evil' mean in In Isaiah 45.7
I just added yet another book to my reading list ;) - great answer, +1
Oct
2
comment Why is the observation that “it was good” missing on the second day?
to an extent, it is always helpful to translate or find English resources. My point is that if you only have a Hebrew source and translating all but the relevant parts would be tangential to an answer, don't hesitate to link to the Hebrew text. Make no mistake about it, our goal is to build a site for experts - it's ok to require prerequisite knowledge (most other SE sites do).
Oct
2
comment Why is the observation that “it was good” missing on the second day?
thanks! Although note that linking to the Hebrew is also fine. Generally speaking, an expert in Biblical Studies likely can read Greek, Hebrew, Aramaic, and often also French and German.