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m.a. biblical studies (new testament)

thesis: the grammatical and cultural role of luke's portrayal of possessions in luke-acts


Jan
30
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What is the “New Hermeneutic”?
Jan
29
comment To what extent do deductive approaches consider authorial intent?
Finally, I will say that if God is all of the omnis that we Christians claim that he is, then he still has jurisdiction over "biblical scholars [who] to do nothing but enforce their unbelief on scriptures not knowing that they are filled with the faith of the original author." Good can still come from that but you need to be discerning as to what the "good" is. Overall, +1 from me.
Jan
29
comment To what extent do deductive approaches consider authorial intent?
I also agree with your bolded paragraph, though I'd back off at the "true dogmatic pressures derived from previous inductions upon the text are required" because it's not necessarily a requirement to apply critical methods to a text. It is a requirement if you're applying critical methods in order to arrive at a theological conclusion and you wish that conclusion to be fully integrated with your extant theology :).
Jan
29
comment To what extent do deductive approaches consider authorial intent?
A few quick comments. Deductive study is "topical." It is the approach by which we start with a concept and search through a corpus finding places where the works within that corpus address that concept. Inductive study relies on drawing conclusions from observations on the text. Both are quite susceptible to misuse which is why I wholeheartedly agree with your encouragement to use both. I will say that starting with deduction shouldn't be so strongly pressed because tremendous benefit can also come from induction.
Jan
29
comment Does Theophilus of Antioch's statement have any bearing on interpreting Mathew 5:28?
I guess I was just hoping for more of the research and less of the results. Also, I noted that I'd like to see a bit more interaction with the texts. That's the point of hermeneutics. The distillation is nice, but belongs better in the Christianity site. The process (which you've clearly done) is appropriate for here. I share your sentiment but would just like for you to share the research too.
Jan
28
answered What is the “New Hermeneutic”?
Jan
28
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Was Origen Adamantius an “allegorist” in the modern sense of the word?
Jan
28
comment Why did the tabernacle use the colors blue, purple and scarlet?
Hi Mark, and welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics. We normally strive to have answers that are based on statements of fact that will help lead to solid exegesis. Answers containing conjecture tend to be downvoted. I'd like to see a bit more development of this answer with either sources, or a survey of biblical material that confirm your statements.
Jan
28
comment Does Theophilus of Antioch's statement have any bearing on interpreting Mathew 5:28?
Fraser - thanks for the answer. I've noticed a couple of good answers that you've made and this one just seems a bit different. It's not blatantly incorrect, but it's also not really up to the standards you've set for yourself or for this site. I'd recommend a bit more research and textual evidence so that you can either supplement the current answer or critically interact with it.
Jan
25
awarded  Custodian
Jan
25
reviewed Reviewed Does πορνεία mean premarital sex in 1 Corinthians 5-7?
Jan
25
answered Based on recent manuscript discoveries, is the LXX more reliable than the MT?
Jan
25
comment Who is speaking in Song of Solomon 8:6-7?
@Caleb you did a great job. Much better now
Jan
24
comment Who is speaking in Song of Solomon 8:6-7?
You do realize that you're eliminating a wide range of scholarship with the a priori assessment that this work is, in fact, allegorical. As such, I fear that there may be gaps in the exegesis and interpretation.
Jan
24
comment Does Theophilus of Antioch's statement have any bearing on interpreting Mathew 5:28?
The link you provided is a truly fascinating rant and has quite a few logical fallacies. I'm posting this as a comment because it's not directly related to the text, but the logical fallacy upon which this is based is painful. The author notes that he's using the "biblical" definition of a few words, but uses Strong's. I'm not against Strong's, but I'm not going to say that it's "inspired" or the only resource available. Bauer's Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature
Jan
22
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Jesus is both the good shepherd and the gate - Is it the same parable or two different?
Jan
22
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What is the difference between exegesis and hermeneutics?
Jan
22
comment Would it matter if the ID of 'Autor' was revealed and who are the potential candidates?
Also, this statement doesn't really follow your logic. "It is also on the ground which I feel it is unlikely anyone wrote it except Paul, who was the deepest Apostle which Peter admits wrote things hard to understand to the Hebrews." Hebrews would be more readily understood by a Jewish audience because of its OT foundations, right? Peter was noting that Paul wrote things that were difficult for Jewish readers to understand. Also, I find Paul as the "deepest" author to be subjective. Ultimately I agree with your answer, I'm just trying to help you shore it up a bit.
Jan
22
answered Is Jesus called God in 2 Thessalonians 1:12?
Jan
22
comment Would it matter if the ID of 'Autor' was revealed and who are the potential candidates?
As an aside, please feel free to edit my answer if you'd like to have the publisher/publication city in the citation. I have blanke parentheses just for that purpose.