11,334 reputation
33771
bio website frankluke.com
location Knoxville, IA
age 38
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen 14 hours ago

I am a web programmer by day (PHP) and work on sermons and teaching material in the evenings.

I attended Assemblies of God Theological Seminary in Springfield, Missouri, for a Master of Arts in Theological Studies and a Master of Divinity. I am an associate pastor at a small church in Iowa. While in seminary, my emphasis was on Old Testament studies, but Dr. Wave Nunnally introduced me to the rabbinics. Those have become a special interest as well.

I also enjoy apologetics and was a very active member of the apologetics.org forum before it went defunct.


Jul
16
comment Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
@ScottS, I've rephrased my statement (I've found an even more direct quote from 1 Enoch than it being a summary of the Similitudes). Frankly, it boggles the mind that some can read the verse in Jude then read 1 Enoch 1:9 and conclude that Jude isn't referring to 1 Enoch. Especially since Jude has already quoted "The Assumption of Moses."
Jul
16
comment Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
@ScottS, a work doesn't have to be canonical to be quoted in the New Testament. Paul quoted Greek philosophers and playwrights. Jude quotes The Assumption of Moses and 1 Enoch. Jesus often starts with what people are familiar with and expands it (sometimes even turning it around).
Jul
14
comment Forgiveness, yes or no?
Welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics! If you would be so kind as to add version references to your quotes, it would be greatly appreciated. If they all come from the same, just note that once ("All verse references are from the NIV/NASB"). I would figure it out and paste them for you, but my browser is acting up today regarding BibleGateway.
Jul
11
comment What did Paul call Christians?
In Acts 22:4, he calls them "followers of this way" and uses that as a name for Christians in 24:14 ("However, I admit that I worship the God of our ancestors as a follower of the Way, which they call a sect."). Jesus had identified himself as "the Way" (John 14:6) and the name appears throughout Acts (9:2; 11:26; 19:9, 23; 22:4; 24:14, 22; see 18:25, 26 for the similar terms "the Way of the Lord" and "the way of God"). Luke seems to have liked it. However, Paul does not use that term in the Epistles.
Jul
8
comment Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
@ScottS, while I understand scholars argue over the dating of Enoch, I don't see how they can look at the internal and external evidence and place it in the CE era (though I agree with them that it was written in pieces over the course of centuries). For example, works whose age are not debated (and placed BCE) allude to Enoch (by name). I believe Testament of Abraham is one of them. I do have a list of reasons at home for why I date all of Enoch to the BCE era.
Jul
8
comment Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
@MarkEdward, while it may not be definitive, the concepts of "light," "darkness," and "sons of light" from John 12 all appear frequently in War Scroll.
Jul
8
comment Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
@ScottS, I have not read all of it, unfortunately. I did note that he says "late first century BCE."
Jul
8
comment Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
@Jas3.1, found one.
Jul
8
comment Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
That verse is the same. There is indeed a different numbering scheme. neno.co.ke/bible/book/Book%20of%20Enoch/71/14 is like the one I had.
Jul
8
comment 1Kings 14:24 literal interpretation
@BlessedGeek, words change in meaning over time (in Mishnaic Hebrew, 'olam means "world" not an indication of length of time). In the Hebrew Bible, there are places where it means "lengthened days" and others where it means "indefinite futurity" (and a few times even of "ancient past," e.g. Ecc 1:10). In the link, skip the Strongs section and go to Brown-Driver-Briggs. Many more details. Lastly, the LXX is ancient, not medieval. All scholars recognize that it can be a help (but not necessarily the final say) in interpreting a passage.
Jul
8
comment 1Kings 14:24 literal interpretation
@BlessedGeek, Joseph used the wrong reference in his block quote. Typo. He meant 24 but typed 22.
Jul
7
comment When does the first day of Genesis 1 begin?
>'But now we all know now that the word "love" is a far better translation than the word, "charity".' This is an example of lingual shift (see also how the word "suffer" has changed since 1611). The word charity as used in the time prior to and after 1611 accurately reflected agape. That subsequent use of "charity" in English changed does not mean that the KJV got that word wrong.
Jul
2
comment Matthew originally written in Hebrew?
One of my seminary profs (Wave Nunnally) holds this position. Scholars in the field who would be most likely to hold it whom I am familiar with are: Brad H. Young, David Flusser, Marvin Wilson, and David Bivin.
Jun
19
comment Is “kill” a valid translation for Exodus 20:13 (Thou shalt not kill)?
@Onlyheisgood., I read several posts on the blog; it's interesting, but I think the technique is a stretch. For example, the word he defines as "other" is then given in the plural, "others". In Elohim, he uses the long vowel marker near the end but not before (in the same word). Why skip the first? I tried this with a few words. I don't see how bless fits. It's spelt bet resh kaph. That would mean, on the chart, Tent floor plan-Family, House, In + Head of Man-First, Top, Beginning + open palm-bend, open, allow, tame. I'm sorry, I just don't see it working consistently w/o major stretches.
Jun
18
comment What is the historical interpretation of 'Nicolaitans' in Rev 2:15?
Welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics! This question is a good example of what we are trying to do here. It starts from the text and asks how it has been interpreted. Our site tour has more information.
Jun
9
comment Psalm 34:20 applied to Jesus' crucifixion
@BruceJames, I know Kaiser is a Christian. I said he was a Hebrew scholar, which he is. As to the Rabbinic, I am sorry I got the source wrong. A hard drive crash took the file where I had this citation recorded.
Jun
6
comment Psalm 34:20 applied to Jesus' crucifixion
@BruceJames Some citations were already in the link I provided. For example, Kaiser does so in The Messiah in the Old Testament, footnote 10 pg. 115 and 116 of my edition. It's in the chapter that covers Ps 22. For the rabbinic, I believe it was Midrash on Psalms, but it was a long time ago that I read it. Other sources (Aquila, Symachius, and the DSS) varied on what verb it should be, but they were consistent in using verbs.
Jun
6
comment Psalm 34:20 applied to Jesus' crucifixion
Hebrew scholar Walter Kaiser shows grammatically how ka'ari can be the irregular plural for ka'arim. The pre-Christian LXX and Dead Sea Scrolls also render 22:16b with a verb, as do some rabbinic interpretations.
Jun
5
comment How does the Septuagint differ from the Masoretic text for Isaiah 7:14?
@curiousdannii, Mitchell J Dahood often interprets with different vowel points in his studies. IIRC, he treats the consonants with great care, but woe to the points if they be in his way!
Jun
3
comment Explanation of Isaiah 40:12
Thanks! That kind of outline provides more bang-for-your-buck than any other analysis I've been taught.