10,034 reputation
23466
bio website crossandcosmos.com
location Knoxville, IA
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen 5 hours ago

I am a web programmer by day (PHP) and work on sermons and teaching material in the evenings.

I attended Assemblies of God Theological Seminary in Springfield, Missouri, for a Master of Arts in Theological Studies and a Master of Divinity. I am an associate pastor at a small church in Iowa. While in seminary, my emphasis was on Old Testament studies, but Dr. Wave Nunnally introduced me to the rabbinics. Those have become a special interest as well.

I also enjoy apologetics and was a very active member of the apologetics.org forum before it went defunct.


Aug
14
comment Bart D. Ehrman - respected critic?
That is exactly what I (and Wallace) addressing. Not his stance, but his methods.
Aug
6
comment Was Greek Mark's second language?
Good thought. And just because a translator isn't mentioned as being present doesn't mean there wasn't one. The only times translators are mentioned are when their presence or absence is important (e.g. Joseph uses translators with his brothers before the reveal Gen 42:23).
Jul
15
comment Interpretation of Genesis 1:26?
The example makes me think of a qal vkomer in reverse. This shows us "as does the greater, so must the lesser." QvK says, "If the minor is true, the major must also be true."
Jul
12
comment Did Jesus wear pants?
@TRiG, yes, he did.
Jul
11
comment Meaning of Daniel 2:43
It's also possible that the translators are taking the hithpael as an intensive form instead of a reflexive. It can be used as an intensive (so it wouldn't be flat-out wrong), but this is rarer in my studies. Intensive can sometimes be seen from context. One of the links gives an example along the lines of "I married a wife" where "married" is in the hithpael. Obviously, you don't marry yourself (reflexive), so it must be intensive.
Jun
25
comment Does the New Testament use of Abba to address God signify a more intimate relationship than found in the Tanakh?
@MonicaCellio, the whole thing is not available yet. However, I have a scan of the conclusion that I can send to you.
Jun
19
comment Does the New Testament use of Abba to address God signify a more intimate relationship than found in the Tanakh?
Dr. Nunnally's dissertation was on the use of "abba" as a name for God in the Dead Sea Scrolls. It's present there enough for his doctoral committee at Hebrew Union to sign off on it. :-)
Jun
15
comment What is the order of events of Nahum and Jonah?
Added more information about internal clues to the dates of the two books.
May
10
comment Is “wept on his neck” a Hebrew idiom?
that was my response exactly.
May
9
comment Is “wept on his neck” a Hebrew idiom?
The rabbinic there was once pointed out to me as an example of vampirism. I did not justify that with a response.
Apr
30
comment Does archaeological evidence contradict the Documentary Hypothesis?
I have a chart with the different forms at home. I'll add them in later.
Apr
30
comment How did Jesus say “Unless the marriage is unlawful”?
@swasheck, there are also 2 extant mss of Matthew in Hebrew (not Aramaic). They are younger than some of the Greek mss. but not all. Also, there is a tradition in the church fathers that Matthew wrote in Hebrew. Jerome testified that he had touched the still existing original when he traveled to the Holy Land.
Apr
28
comment Comparison of English word “fool” in original Hebrew and Greek
@JonEricson, it's always good to start with the etymology. And for "raca," I think it is exactly right. When compound words are first used, they will have meanings like their components. As time passes, the meaning sometimes shifts. monosgeneis is a good example.
Apr
27
comment Comparison of English word “fool” in original Hebrew and Greek
I've wondered about Nabal's name many times.
Apr
27
comment Did someone really name their son Fool?
@JackDouglas, Yep. Jacob means "trickster, supplanter, heel grabber (one who gets ahead at another's expense)". He was named Heel-grabber because he was born holding onto Esau's heel.
Apr
27
comment Pros and Cons of Barth's Commentary on Romans
These are great questions to ask about a commentary! I like the idea of reviewing different ones.
Apr
20
comment Does Luke's supposed profession matter when interpreting his work as an author?
I've noticed that Luke tends to use medical terms and include little details that most others would skip over.
Apr
16
comment What does “Under the Sun” mean in Ecclesiastes?
"that which is earthly, human, mutable, brief and weak, in contrast to the divine, spiritual, immutable, eternal and invincible." That's what I was trying to say with, "Of the physical world" is not quite the same as "without God", but it should be remembered that it contrasts to "the spiritual world." Thanks!
Apr
14
comment Can “שָׂנֵא” mean “rejected”?
@Kazark. Thanks. The context in Dt is that the men suspect the women have lied to them (claimed to be virgin but he has found evidence that she was not). Probably not much love there, you're right.
Apr
12
comment What is Leviticus 13:55 all about?
@RonMaimon, the LXX of Numbers makes it easy to reverse engineer to Hebrew also. Most places, it is Greek vocabulary with Hebrew syntax. In other words, a very literal translator did Numbers. Where they agree (most places), we can be more certain that the MT was preserved correctly. Where they differ, we can then debate which was corrupted on later copies.