11,162 reputation
33671
bio website frankluke.com
location Knoxville, IA
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen 1 hour ago

I am a web programmer by day (PHP) and work on sermons and teaching material in the evenings.

I attended Assemblies of God Theological Seminary in Springfield, Missouri, for a Master of Arts in Theological Studies and a Master of Divinity. I am an associate pastor at a small church in Iowa. While in seminary, my emphasis was on Old Testament studies, but Dr. Wave Nunnally introduced me to the rabbinics. Those have become a special interest as well.

I also enjoy apologetics and was a very active member of the apologetics.org forum before it went defunct.


1d
reviewed Delete Why doesn't Jesus give away all his money?
1d
comment Why doesn't Jesus give away all his money?
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post.
1d
reviewed Reviewed Was Abiathar the son of Ahimelech or was Ahimelech the son of Abiathar?
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awarded  Altruist
2d
comment What did Paul call Christians?
In Acts 22:4, he calls them "followers of this way" and uses that as a name for Christians in 24:14 ("However, I admit that I worship the God of our ancestors as a follower of the Way, which they call a sect."). Jesus had identified himself as "the Way" (John 14:6) and the name appears throughout Acts (9:2; 11:26; 19:9, 23; 22:4; 24:14, 22; see 18:25, 26 for the similar terms "the Way of the Lord" and "the way of God"). Luke seems to have liked it. However, Paul does not use that term in the Epistles.
Jul
10
revised Is there any significance to the shift between cardinal and ordinal numbers in Genesis 1?
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Jul
10
awarded  Investor
Jul
10
answered Is there any significance to the shift between cardinal and ordinal numbers in Genesis 1?
Jul
10
revised Does “Hebrew” refer to the language or the language family?
added 1199 characters in body
Jul
9
answered Does “Hebrew” refer to the language or the language family?
Jul
8
comment Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
@ScottS, while I understand scholars argue over the dating of Enoch, I don't see how they can look at the internal and external evidence and place it in the CE era (though I agree with them that it was written in pieces over the course of centuries). For example, works whose age are not debated (and placed BCE) allude to Enoch (by name). I believe Testament of Abraham is one of them. I do have a list of reasons at home for why I date all of Enoch to the BCE era.
Jul
8
comment Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
@MarkEdward, while it may not be definitive, the concepts of "light," "darkness," and "sons of light" from John 12 all appear frequently in War Scroll.
Jul
8
revised Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
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Jul
8
comment Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
@ScottS, I have not read all of it, unfortunately. I did note that he says "late first century BCE."
Jul
8
comment Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
@Jas3.1, found one.
Jul
8
revised Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
added 49 characters in body
Jul
8
revised Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
added 49 characters in body
Jul
8
comment Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
That verse is the same. There is indeed a different numbering scheme. neno.co.ke/bible/book/Book%20of%20Enoch/71/14 is like the one I had.
Jul
8
answered Is the Son of Man passage in Matthew 25 a reference to 1 Enoch?
Jul
8
comment 1Kings 14:24 literal interpretation
@BlessedGeek, words change in meaning over time (in Mishnaic Hebrew, 'olam means "world" not an indication of length of time). In the Hebrew Bible, there are places where it means "lengthened days" and others where it means "indefinite futurity" (and a few times even of "ancient past," e.g. Ecc 1:10). In the link, skip the Strongs section and go to Brown-Driver-Briggs. Many more details. Lastly, the LXX is ancient, not medieval. All scholars recognize that it can be a help (but not necessarily the final say) in interpreting a passage.