2,245 reputation
32460
bio website alerque.com
location Izmir, Turkey
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen 4 mins ago

I am a scripting language connoisseur, regular expression aficionado, network geek, general lover of Linux and a frequent contributor to open source software. I transitioned to programming from other work because I was too busy automating my own work environment to actually do the other work. I have a hobby interest in cartography. For more see my personal site. Most importantly, my life is defined by the grace of God given to men through Jesus Christ. It is my ambition that everything I do would reflect His glory and point people towards Him.


17h
comment Why is part of Luke 9:55-56 omitted in some Bible translations?
This is not only wrong, it is amusingly so since the alleged omission would actually be evidence for rather than against that understanding. The committee behind the ESV in particular supports that theological position, the suggestion that they would leave it out for theological reasons is amusingly misguided. If you really want to postulate this answer, I recommend at least dealing with the manuscript issues involved and them building your argument for why it must come down to this on top of actual facts.
20h
comment Who were the Hellenistic and Hebraic Jews of Acts 6:1?
We expect a bit more than this of answers. Care to edit and make this a full answer?
1d
comment Why do translations use “wild ox”?
It seems to me the part of this question not well covered by the other question is actually more of an English language question than a hermeneutic one. "Bull" for example has gender specific connotations, "cow" and "cattle" don't come across right at all and the range of usage covered by "ox" seems to vary considerably by locale, but generally does include the thing being talked about. Whether there is a term that is unequivocally better and whether "ox" is limited in the way you think of it seems like an matter of English usage more that a textual problem.
Mar
24
comment Can the term “eisegesis” apply to the interpretation of Old Testament passages as prophecies specifically of Jesus?
@Joseph This isn't a passage specific question, it's about terminology used in connection with the field of hermeneutics. I don't see a problem with that in general (see most of the stuff in the hermeneutical-approaches tag, and related meta posts (e.g. this one and this one, etc.).
Mar
20
comment How convincing were the proofs of the resurrection in Acts 1:3?
I apologize if my comments have come across as harsh. I'm not trying to rag on you and I don't speak Greek myself. I'm out of my depth here too but I got at least this far using readily available English resources. You've hit a pet peeve of mine though—and that is trying to gloss over translation issues as if words can only have one meaning and one possible corresponding word in another language. I'm a strong advocate for accurately translating Scripture taking as few liberties in diction as possible, but being bilingual I know that this is hard (and more complex than this post indicates).
Mar
20
comment How convincing were the proofs of the resurrection in Acts 1:3?
@DickHarfield The accusation is strongly implied that the KJV inserted a word that "wasn't there" in the original (scare quotes because that's much harder to demonstrate than it is to say), went against the king and didn't live up to their own translation philosophy. The case you make for this from the actual text is completely unconvincing, esp. as you use an interlinear that differs in its choice of root parsing from almost every other one I've ever seen. I don't think you can reasonably expect to answer this question without actually examining the semantic range of meaning of τεκμηρίοις.
Mar
20
comment How convincing were the proofs of the resurrection in Acts 1:3?
@PaulVargas You can't open that link directly, you have to first visit the hosting page on the original site and click on the link from there. They are blocking link referrers not from their own site.
Mar
20
comment How convincing were the proofs of the resurrection in Acts 1:3?
I try especially hard not to downvote answers to my own questions—and I do believe this is an honest attempt to help—but not only does it not answer my question I think it may actually be misleading. The one sentence mentioning the Greek is considerably less informative than any of the dozen commentaries or study Bibles I have at my disposal. I came here looking for something more, not less. In addition to not demonstrating whether the Greek is reasonably translated one way or another or both (and not even mentioning the ESV), the accusation leveled at the KJV seems completely unjustified.
Mar
14
comment Does Isaiah 7:14 refer to a virgin?
It appears you are not the original author of much of this analysis. Even in a question, not crediting this is considered plagiarism. You need to edit this and use > markers to format quoted text and include appropriate credit where it is due (to include names, publication data, and links as appropriate).
Mar
6
comment Did Mark intend to end his gospel at 16:8?
Besides being a raw assertion of a conclusion (rather than the demonstration of how a conclusion was arrived at as required by this site in general) this answers the wrong question. It's basically an answer to the opposite question that was asked and does nothing to explain to the inquisitive what case might be made the other direction.
Feb
19
comment Do the specific gifts the father gives to the prodigal son have any special significance?
@rhetorician If you ask me the "teller" of the whole Bible, the centerpiece that is woven through every story is Jesus. But we're talking about tagging here man—and there all all sorts of things told by or about Jesus that don't benefit from the jesus tag. This one is about Jesus audience and the times and culture he was speaking to, not about his own person. Tags are a taxonomy for the site and should reflect the scope of each question. Just because the parable itself might be about Jesus or he was the speaker doesn't make this question about his person.
Feb
16
comment Are the judgement's in Joel 3:2, Matthew 25:31-32, and Revelation 20:12 referring to the same event?
Can you edit this to indicate what you mean by "difference"? Are you expecting the same words (you know they were written in different languages right?) or that they refer to the same event or what?
Feb
15
comment Do 2nd Peter 3:12 and Amos 5:18 contradict each other in their advice in regard to the day of God?
This question could use a little more explanation. What exactly (in prose) do you think the contradiction would be here?
Feb
5
comment How is the New World Translation's usage of “Jehovah” controversial?
@TRiG Whether this is the "best" answer or not could be disputed but that it is an answer does't seem to be the issue here. In spite of not naming the translation it does address the issue that makes it controversial. See for example the second to last paragraph. That's what NWT did.
Feb
5
comment What is the difference between exegesis and hermeneutics?
Are you sure you don't have your terms cross-wired in part of this answer?
Feb
2
comment Hermeneutically, how do we reconcile Jesus' teaching on loving our enemies and YHWH's telling Israel to destroy their enemies?
I vacillated about migrating it to Christianity but opted against it because I would have to promptly close it there too as it is not addressed at any particular theological tradition. That being said the easiest way I see to to make this workable on SE would be to fix it up for C.SE and if you'd like to go ahead with that I can migrate it there. I don't see any way it even comes close to working on this site.
Feb
2
comment Hermeneutically, how do we reconcile Jesus' teaching on loving our enemies and YHWH's telling Israel to destroy their enemies?
No matter how many times the word "hermeneutically" is inserted here, reconciling apparent issues between OT and NT teachings is clearly a doctrinal issue. As this question does not start from a specific text nor is it about the general field of hermeneutics it is off topic for this site.
Jan
30
comment What do the words “fear and trembling” in Philippians 2 refer to?
I've migrated this to Biblical Hermeneutics because in the absence of a doctrinal framework which you are questioning, "what does X mean" questions are off topic on Christianity. If you'd like to question what the interpretations of a specific theological tradition are then by all means ask there but you must specify.
Dec
29
comment What does “sit” mean in the scripture “The prostitute who sits on many waters.”
As other answers demonstrate it is likely that the general conclusion of this answer isn't far off the mark, but arriving at this conclusion by comparing other English language usages is a completely bogus hermeneutical method. This answer is not useful as far as teaching people how to find answers.
Dec
26
comment What are the translations of the Greek word “monogenes” in Ancient Versions?Is it “only” or “only-begotten”?
Josephus and Plato are not ancient translations of the Bible, they are examples of usage in other literature. None of the other content here appears to be ancient translations. I don't think this does much to answer the original question.