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comment Why were the Ten Commandments written on two tablets?
I've removed the unrelated (and very nearly spam) parts of this. What's left sort of talks about the issue, but you do a ton of asserting random things as fact and virtually zero showing how or why you connected those pieced which is a requirement for this site. What citations can you give to show how you reached your first major assertion?
Aug
14
comment What are the implications of calling Jesus “the son of Mary” in Mark 6:3?
Mod Notice: Comments are not the place to debate theological issues. They can be used to request clarifications or suggest improvements to posts, but let's not use them as a make shift debate platform. You can use the Biblical Hermeneutics Chat system if you want to discuss something.
Jul
31
comment Why was Abel a “keeper of flocks”?
Although I agree with the gist of this answer, I think the way you use the texts and connect the dots is pretty sketchy. For example the statement «The only works Abel had done is keep the flocks.» is not a direct inference from the text you quote nor is in the most widely accepted interpretation of that verse.
Jun
16
comment Meaning of the Parable of the Sower
Even after reading this twice I have no idea what point you are trying to make or how you think this directs us to the meaning of the parable as asked about in the question. Notably lacking is anywhere that you actually show how you arrived at the connections you have.
Jun
6
comment Why did Jesus tell the demon-possessed man to tell others about his healing in Luke 8:39?
We expect a bit more than "I would like to think" as the basis for answers around here. Rather that "he might have", can you actually propose an interpretation and defend how you arrived at it from the text?
Jun
4
comment Matt. 27:52 “tombs also were opened” apocalyptic symbolism?
@Tau Please see my follow up comments in chat starting here. I'm cleaning this space up a little as our comments now are likely not helpful to the original poster or readers.
Jun
4
comment Matt. 27:52 “tombs also were opened” apocalyptic symbolism?
@Tau It is really distracting (and not useful to others) when you use technical terms with broadly agreed upon meanings to mean something different than everybody else does by them. As this is not the first instance of this error, please note the normative use of the term Textual Criticism refers to a specific aspect of hermeneutics that deals with discrepancies between different source manuscripts of the same document. As far as I can make out your comment is not actually a reference to the issue of textual criticism, modern or otherwise.
Jun
1
comment Meaning of (et)“את” and (v'et)“וְאֵ֥ת” in Genesis 1:1
Hey man please no more new posts! I already explained this once and have now done the cleanup work for you twice. If you have an improved version of an answer to post you need to edit this answer and replace its content. This allows people to compare previous revisions and see what you fixed and keeps to post ranking system consistent.
May
31
comment Meaning of (et)“את” and (v'et)“וְאֵ֥ת” in Genesis 1:1
I think you've miss-understood the format here. Please don't make new posts. If you have a better to answer to offer than your original attempt, please edit the original post. If voters see an improvement they will then be able to change their votes and re-rank the post. But please don't throw stuff at the ceiling to see what sticks...put your best foot forward and then improve it. I've gone ahead and merged the content from your three answers into one, but you might want to review the history and see if there are things that need to be edited into the final version to make it complete.
Apr
30
comment What are the many Sabbaths referred to in scripture?
@Tau I avoided getting into the specifics of that issue because ① it didn't seem like the main problem the OP was facing, ② the issue of plurals still applies as described and ③ the sabbath years are an extension of the day concept but applied to the land rather than the people. On the other hand I did mention how that passage it different. If you thing there is a better way to clarify this all please feel free to post another answer.
Apr
28
comment What are the many Sabbaths referred to in scripture?
@JonathanChell Maybe I wasn't clear enough in my answer, but as I understood the question the OP was expecting "sabbaths" to refer to holy days other than the sabbath—other feast days perhaps—as if sabbath days were some general category of holy day rather than a reference to the weekly sabbath. The only inference I intended to make is that these are all references to the same weekly Sabbath and is only plural because it sometimes referrers to more than one week.
Apr
28
comment What are the many Sabbaths referred to in scripture?
@JonathanChell I don't see any indication that it wouldn't. Most commentaries I've checked seem to just take this for granted as the obvious reading of the plural just makes sense. The OP above just seemed to be in a funk and missing the obvious (it happens to all of us). If there is more of a question here than what was posed it would seem like the burden would be on the questioner to come up with some shred of reasoning why the obvious reading doesn't fit, which I don't see in this case in my cursory review of these passages and some commentary.
Apr
8
comment Why is Daniel Chapter 2:4 - 7:28 written in Aramaic?
The entire case hinges on subtleties of English that may or may even reflect the original text. And even if they are, there is nothing here to demonstrate that they mean what you are reading into them. Considering the far more likely plainer reading, it seems the burden of proof ought to lie on the one proposing a completely novel reading to demonstrate the case that the text actually leads in that direction and exclude other more attested explanations.
Apr
8
comment Why is Daniel Chapter 2:4 - 7:28 written in Aramaic?
This has all the components of a good answer on this site (well formatted, thoroughly explained, works from the text and specific context up, etc.), and yet I think you're missing the mark. The final conclusion you arrive at isn't even all that off theologically, but as far as hermeneutics go the actual process of interpretation here is … and please don't think I'm just out to bash some view I don't agree with here … but it's nonsense. It is beyond unconvincing.
Mar
30
comment Is the use of the smallest possible example meant to indicate a complete absence of faith in Jesus sayings related to mustard seeds?
@PaulDean I've tweaked the close reason here as I think the previous one was miss-applied, but it seems this is largely duplicated elsewhere. Perhaps if there is and angle you think isn't being addressed by the other questions you could edit this one to be more clearly focused on the aspect that is unique to this question and we could re-open it.
Mar
30
comment Is the use of the smallest possible example meant to indicate a complete absence of faith in Jesus sayings related to mustard seeds?
@Tau The over-dramatization of the normal work-flow for handling questions isn't really necessary. This has not "descended into a systematic theology discussion" at all. It got closed. Closing questions that have scope issues is normal and the normal response would be to figure out a way to fix them. The close reason is a stock thing and not phrased for this specific question. In this case I think it might have been miss-applied, but it's not hard to see where the original title of this question set off the wrong bells in people's minds.
Mar
28
comment Why is part of Luke 9:55-56 omitted in some Bible translations?
This is not only wrong, it is amusingly so since the alleged omission would actually be evidence for rather than against that understanding. The committee behind the ESV in particular supports that theological position, the suggestion that they would leave it out for theological reasons is amusingly misguided. If you really want to postulate this answer, I recommend at least dealing with the manuscript issues involved and them building your argument for why it must come down to this on top of actual facts.
Mar
27
comment Why do translations use “wild ox”?
It seems to me the part of this question not well covered by the other question is actually more of an English language question than a hermeneutic one. "Bull" for example has gender specific connotations, "cow" and "cattle" don't come across right at all and the range of usage covered by "ox" seems to vary considerably by locale, but generally does include the thing being talked about. Whether there is a term that is unequivocally better and whether "ox" is limited in the way you think of it seems like an matter of English usage more that a textual problem.
Mar
24
comment Can the term “eisegesis” apply to the interpretation of Old Testament passages as prophecies specifically of Jesus?
@Joseph This isn't a passage specific question, it's about terminology used in connection with the field of hermeneutics. I don't see a problem with that in general (see most of the stuff in the hermeneutical-approaches tag, and related meta posts (e.g. this one and this one, etc.).
Mar
20
comment How convincing were the proofs of the resurrection in Acts 1:3?
I apologize if my comments have come across as harsh. I'm not trying to rag on you and I don't speak Greek myself. I'm out of my depth here too but I got at least this far using readily available English resources. You've hit a pet peeve of mine though—and that is trying to gloss over translation issues as if words can only have one meaning and one possible corresponding word in another language. I'm a strong advocate for accurately translating Scripture taking as few liberties in diction as possible, but being bilingual I know that this is hard (and more complex than this post indicates).