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Mar
19
comment How many future resurrections are there in the New Testament?
(2) The N.T. further distinguishes Moses’ case by telling us of an argument between Michael the Archangel and the Devil – and that was about Moses’ body. All of this singles Moses out and makes him somewhat closer to Enoch and Elijah, the only two persons in the O.T. of whom we are told that they were taken by God while they were still alive, rather than to any other ordinary human. Moses’ appearance on the mount of transfiguration with Elijah is, of course, another case in point stressing the exclusiveness of Moses’ case.
Mar
19
comment How many future resurrections are there in the New Testament?
(1) “Moses was seen on the mount of transfiguration. Was he resurrected?” – Moses, though we ARE told in the O.T. that he DID die, is still quite a special case, so to say – he is the only person in the O.T. of whom it is mentioned specifically that, even though he was buried, no man knows were his grave is (Deut. 34:6). Also, he is the only prophet, in fact, the only human in the whole O.T., of whom the Scripture specifically mentions that at the moment of his death “his eye was not dim, nor his natural force abated” (Deut. 34:7).
Mar
19
comment How many future resurrections are there in the New Testament?
"here are many minor resurrections; Enoch; Genesis 5:24" How is what happened to Enoch a resurrection? As far as I know, Enoch, just like Elijah, never died.
Mar
1
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
25
comment “the first day of the week” in 1 Corinthians 16:2
@Sarah - "What specifically did you want to know when you posted this question? Did you want to know if it is possible that this is the Sabbath or that this is the first day of 50 days counting toward 7 Sabbaths?" - I just wanted to get an overview of all major views on this matter as I was not familiar with any one of them while I was asking this question.
Feb
25
comment “the first day of the week” in 1 Corinthians 16:2
@Sara: "Bullingers comment on Mark 16:1&2 indicates this "first day" - Is it from Companion Bible? Perhaps, he inserted into it his view on the Sabbath that he had had even prior to meeting Welch. He might've still held this view afterwards - I don't really know. Bullinger had only 5 years to live after meeting Welch. The quote that I brought up in my question is from a book written more than 20 years after his death. If there were any big differences between B and W, I think Welch would've mentioned that either in the book that I quoted or in his autobiography. AFAIK, they had no such.
Feb
24
comment “the first day of the week” in 1 Corinthians 16:2
@Sarah: (2) Don't have precise info on the matter of Sabbath, but I am pretty sure that this matter was no longer that important for him. You may want to read Welch's autobiography: charleswelch.net/Autobiography.PDF - he talks there about his meeting with Bullinger on page 81.
Feb
24
comment “the first day of the week” in 1 Corinthians 16:2
@Sarah: (1) "Can you tell me about this in the library" - I don't think I could say much, so I'll just answer here. "When Bullinger wrote the Companion Bible was it his understanding that this was actually a Sabbath or did his views change after that?" - He started writing Companian Bible after he met with Welch in 1908 and accepted his perspective, having acknowledged that "half of his books" now must be "scrapped".
Feb
24
comment “the first day of the week” in 1 Corinthians 16:2
@Sarah - I was forced to add a quote to my question. At first, I just wanted to ask without any quotes, but later got rebuked. I am not good at handling quotes, hence the mishap. "Or do you understand Bullinger to be saying this is a Sabbath as well?" - Yes, I do. Bullinger was very honest, he even gave up on almost half of his own books after he accepted Welsh's perspective.
Feb
24
comment “the first day of the week” in 1 Corinthians 16:2
@Sarah - As far as I know, they were completely agree with each other on this point. Welch is quoting here the Companion Bible not so as to refute Bullinger in anything, but simply to show what kind of perspective on this matter the Companion Bible has, and later he shows that in the light of the perspective that they were holding (both Welch and Bullinger) this whole matter is no longer important (my quote doesn't have it).
Feb
9
comment What does it actually mean “Judge not, that ye be not judged”?
@LukeBreuer - In fact, looks like a valid answer to me. Why not post it as an answer instead of a comment that could be erased by moderators at any time?
Feb
1
comment Did God say that Adam will die on the same day he ate the fruit?
I just got stricken by one funny idea. 2 Peter 3:8 tells us that with God one thousand years is like one day, and Genesis 5:5 tells us that Adam died when he was 930 years old. So, his lifetime did not exceed 1000 years, which means he DID die on the same 1000-year-long day, which is also the same day when partook of the wrong tree :)
Feb
1
comment What is Luke's purpose for recording this narrative and ultimately Jesus' reason to express this account of the rich man and Lazarus to those present?
@JLB - (2) "If not why regurgitate a portion of Mr Welch's book" - I was only trying to shortly answer your own question ("What do you mean "challenging the validity"?"). "...without reference" - Because I have already given you the reference (link) to that book on another page.
Feb
1
comment What is Luke's purpose for recording this narrative and ultimately Jesus' reason to express this account of the rich man and Lazarus to those present?
@JLB - (1) "seems by your reply, you have come to your own view" - you got me exactly opposite to what I meant in my reply. I don't have my own view yet. I did read Welch's book on this issue, but, as I told you in my comment on another page, many of his points I simply didn't get - I still need to study those points. That's why, in fact, I asked you to read that book because you may have a better understanding of them - regardless of whether you would agree with them or not.
Feb
1
comment What is Luke's purpose for recording this narrative and ultimately Jesus' reason to express this account of the rich man and Lazarus to those present?
"Maybe you should give an answer and defend your view, and include some of the book. Take a stab at it - I challenge you" - :) No need to challenge me here as I don't have my own view on this point yet.
Feb
1
comment What is Luke's purpose for recording this narrative and ultimately Jesus' reason to express this account of the rich man and Lazarus to those present?
"What do you mean "challenging the validity"?" - If I got it right, he says there that this whole story about Lazarus and the rich man is a kind of product of a wrong belief that Jews used to hold (he uses Flavius Josephus' words as a proof of that), but of which no part of the OT is supportive, so Jesus used that wrong-belief story as a contrast to what He was teaching. Same approach is for the parable of the unjust steward earlier in the same chapter.
Feb
1
comment What is Luke's purpose for recording this narrative and ultimately Jesus' reason to express this account of the rich man and Lazarus to those present?
Did you read that book by Welch, the link to which I gave you? If not, he is talking there about it, challenging the whole point of validity of this story about Lazarus and the rich man. Or... are you asking this question because you've just read that book and want to get a broader scope of views?
Jan
31
comment Did God say that Adam will die on the same day he ate the fruit?
@T.A.E. (2) physically alive, yet already sinful, Adam as simply dead. And, therefore, He used the word "die", not "spiritually die". And Jesus also used the word "dead" in Luke 9:60 ("Let the dead bury their dead"), not "spiritually dead". It does not contradict to the men's need to be born of Spirit. However, you can't accuse God in Genesis and Jesus in Luke 9:60 of forgetting to use the word "spiritual" in those cases. What for us is "spiritually dead" is simply "dead" for God - regardless of whether or not the person is still physically alive.
Jan
31
comment Did God say that Adam will die on the same day he ate the fruit?
@T.A.E. (1) "There is much more than eventual physical death, and that is the sense in which I use the word "simplistic" - What makes you think I don't know that or don't believe in that?!!! What you are saying doesn't contradict to my view at all and doesn't say anything new to me either. I know that as soon as someone sins he is in need of rebirth. I know that there is much more than eventual physical death. I know all of that and I do believe in that. It is just that God considered the
Jan
31
comment Did God say that Adam will die on the same day he ate the fruit?
@T.A.E."It's also important to distinguish between ... Man does not have life without the breath of life..." - And how is that contradictory to my "awfully simplistic" view? And what makes you think I don't know what is written in Genesis 2:7?