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seen Oct 7 at 14:26

Jan
3
comment The meaning of the phrase “mustard seed”?
@JonEricson - Having read that page, I am now thinking that my present question must be closed.
Dec
30
comment The meaning of the phrase “mustard seed”?
@MonicaCellio - Just did it.
Dec
30
revised The meaning of the phrase “mustard seed”?
added 541 characters in body
Dec
30
comment Does Revelation 21:9-11 equate the Bride of the Lamb with the City Jerusalem?
I am not sure of this equation being fully supported by hermeneutics, but I am definitely familiar with such Christian teaching, according to which the New Jerusalem is just another reference to the Bride of Christ.
Dec
30
asked The meaning of the phrase “mustard seed”?
Dec
21
comment Romans 16:7 : “fellowprisoners” in the book of Romans?!
"Could he have been imprisoned in Corinth and was referring to Andronicus and Junias as his "fellow prisoners" in Rome?" - If he was then he had surely been released by the time he was writing Romans as in Rom. 15:25 he says that he is going to Jerusalem to serve saints. But then again it looks very strange that Luke decided not to say a word about that imprisonment.
Dec
21
comment Romans 16:7 : “fellowprisoners” in the book of Romans?!
(2) that Paul clearly lets us know that he had never been to Rome, however, in the last chapter he names and sends his regards to so many people from Rome (majority of which are never mentioned in Acts) that it really looks like he had already been there.
Dec
21
comment Romans 16:7 : “fellowprisoners” in the book of Romans?!
(1) Yes, you may be right. Is "fellow prisoners" by all means in apposition to "Andronicus and Junia" in Romans 16:7, that is, could the fellow prisoners be some other people than Andronicus and Junia? If yes, then Andronicus and Junia might've never been imprisoned at all. Well, that still doesn't solve the problem... What really puzzles me about Romans is
Dec
21
comment Romans 16:7 : “fellowprisoners” in the book of Romans?!
@NoahSnyder - Well, you are right - I think I need to research the time span that the scholars put forth as the time when Romans was written (51-58 a.d.) as this is exactly what they say and not what I think. However, unlike in the case with letters, Luke was sure to report even such a short imprisonment as one-night one with Silas in Acts 16 making it very unlikely that he dimmed any other case of imprisonment prior to Acts 23 as unimportant, especially if it was not only Paul, but Paul and some other fellow prisoners imprisoned.
Dec
21
comment Romans 16:7 : “fellowprisoners” in the book of Romans?!
@NoahSnyder - I see it in this phrase: "There are a number of reasons Corinth is most plausible. Paul was about to travel to Jerusalem on writing the letter, which matches Acts 20:3" - If we read Acts, we'll see that Paul simply had no time physically to be imprisoned prior to that time (excluding the short one-night imprisonment in Acts 16:23-28 with Silas, in which Andronicus and Junia, of course, couldn't have taken part), otherwise Luke would've surely reported it to us.
Dec
21
comment Romans 16:7 : “fellowprisoners” in the book of Romans?!
Thanks, but it seems that, if we believe what Wikipedia says, all scholars agree that Romans was written before Paul's VERY FIRST imprisonment, that is, he was never imprisoned prior to writing this epistle; however, this verse gives us a huge basis to think otherwise.
Dec
21
asked Romans 16:7 : “fellowprisoners” in the book of Romans?!
Dec
15
awarded  Yearling
Dec
14
accepted Matthew 11:25: What question is Jesus answering here?
Dec
13
asked Matthew 11:25: What question is Jesus answering here?
Nov
4
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
30
comment Interpretation of the dead ones in 1 Peter 4:6?
I see. Thank you!!!
Oct
30
comment Interpretation of the dead ones in 1 Peter 4:6?
"The "has been preached" is in the aorist passive-a past completed action ("was preached"). Therefore, what this verse is not saying is that dead people continue hearing the gospel, as the universalists desire so" - You are saying something very important to me here. Can you, please, elaborate. What is aorist? Is it a grammatical tense of koine?
Oct
30
comment Interpretation of the dead ones in 1 Peter 4:6?
Out of 4 times when Peter is using νέκρος in his epistle, the first two are definitely related to the physical death, not spiritual death: "...the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead" (1st Peter 1:3), "...God, that raised him up from the dead" (1st Peter 1:21). In order to support the idea that in the other two cases of the same epistle (4:5, 4:6) Peter suddenly switches from physical to allegorical use of this word, some stronger argument must be presented rather than just an allegorical sense of νέκρος used in a parable written by another author (Luke). Plus, here is not a parable.
Oct
26
asked Interpretation of the dead ones in 1 Peter 4:6?