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May
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comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
9) If you look, by the way, at what kind of things Peter was preaching to them, you will notice the content of that preaching that was accessible to the audience: Jesus’ acts of “doing good”, His miracles of healing, His death and resurrection, His judgment, and the forgiveness of sins to those who believe in Him – nothing about being born of God or being born of the Spirit, and nothing about being spiritually dead or alive.
May
22
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
8) And for sure such a phrase like “both the living and the dead” would be firstly understood by him only in the physical sense as such concepts like “physically living, but spiritually dead” or “physically dead, but spiritually alive” were simply not yet familiar to him – just like they were first not familiar to Nicodemus. Peter, of course, realized that; therefore, I make a conclusion that when Peter was using the phrase “both the living and the dead” in his first preaching to Nicodemus and his kinsmen and friends he was using it in the physical sense. ↙
May
22
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
7) So, if the Pharisee Nicodemus, a ruler of Jews and a master of Israel, was so puzzled by these spiritual things when they were first mentioned to him, then we won’t commit an error by suggesting that these things would be equally, if not all the more so, puzzling to the centurion Cornelius who was not a Jew, but rather “one of another nation”, keeping a company with whom was “unlawful for a Jew” (Acts 10:28) – even despite the fact that he was a God-fearing gentile and of good report among Jews (Acts 10:22). ↙
May
22
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
6) However, the matter of baptism and all the imagery related to it is quite off-topic here. For the present thread it will suffice to establish that Nicodemus was quite puzzled when the Lord started talking to him about life and death in spiritual terms. The matter of spiritual birth – that is, the matter of passing from spiritual death into life – was completely out of his frame of reference. ↙
May
22
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
5) – Judah, as we know, was not there, and Thomas must’ve been regenerated one week later when he met Jesus again and believed into Him), which somehow corresponds to Peter’s words in 1st Pet. 1:3: “God … has begotten us … by the resurrection of Jesus Christ”. Incidentally, the Scripture doesn’t tell us that the twelve disciples chosen by Him at the beginning of His ministry were ever baptized in the water, though we know that they themselves were baptizing others. ↙
May
22
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
4) This also means that that person joins the Lord in the spirit and becomes one with Him in his spirit (1 Cor. 6:17). This may take place before baptism, during the baptism or even after (in which case the baptism was probably not valid as it was not done out of faith). I believe that in case with ten disciples of the Lord this regeneration happened not on the day of Pentecost, but on the day of Jesus’ resurrection (at the moment when He breathed into them and said: “Receive the Holy Spirit” – John 20:22 ↙
May
22
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
3) Besides, I don’t think that the moment of regeneration, that is, the point, at which a person becomes a God-born child, necessarily takes place at the time when that person is being baptized in the water. However, I do believe that regeneration happens at the moment when a person believes, opens his heart to Jesus (prayer), and the Spirit of God (Rom. 8:9) – which is also the Spirit of Christ (Rom. 8:9), and is also called Spirit of adoption or sonship (Rom. 8:15) – enters into him and starts living in him. ↙
May
22
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
2) there will be no more sea). The water of baptism is associated with the death and termination of our old natural man (like in Rom. 6:3-4), while the living water is associated with life and the birth of our new man. The former one deals with something negative, while the latter one does something positive. The former one is for “external use” – a person is either immersed into it, washed by it or sprinkled by it, while the latter one is exclusively for “internal use” – one has to drink of it in order to profit from it.↙
May
22
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
1) @Joseph: "thus the imagery of baptism. The physical illustration is water, but the spiritual is "living water" – Well, I would take issue here with your view on regeneration, baptism and baptism imagery. You seem to draw no distinction between the baptismal water and the living water, while to me they are quite different. The former one is hardly ever spoken of as flowing, while the latter one is almost always spoken of as flowing – like in John 4:14, 7:39, Rev. 22:1 (we know that in eternity future there will be the river of water of life flowing from the throne of God, but ↙
May
21
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
2) This phrase, in fact, was very common among Jews, and the physical sense in this phrase looks to me more plausible than spiritual - it is rather unlikely that Jews would imply spiritual sense in it as such concepts like "regenerated by the spirit", "born of the Spirit" or "dead in the spirit" were quite unclear and unfamiliar to them as we can tell from Nicodemus' talk to Jesus (John 3:6-10)
May
21
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
1) @Joseph: "Please see Acts 10:40-42, which is repeated in 2 Tim 4:1. Both passages refer to the judgment, which is yet future" - I still don't understand the reason why the expression "judge both the living and the dead" in those passages should not be interpreted in the physical sense. To me, "both the living and the dead" implies the whole humanity - consisting of those who have already passed away and those who are still living. For sure, at the time when God's judgement starts there will still be some people physically alive, hence, we have "both living and the dead". ↙
May
20
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
3) and the third time he uses this word (1st Peter 4:5), he does it in the common expression ("Judge of both the living and the dead") that, if I am not wrong, is always used in the Scriptures only in the physical sense. It's not that I deny the spiritual interpretation here flat, I just need to be given (shown) a stronger basis for that.
May
20
comment The grammatical tense of the verb “judged” in 1Peter 4:6
2) the disciple was going to bury his father only because of his father's poor spiritual condition and not because of his poor physical state). The second "dead" can also be interpreted in both senses. In 1st Peter 4:4-6, however, I don't see at the moment such a strong basis for such a drastic switch of the sense of the word. In fact, there is even quite a strong basis for retaining the physical sense of the word: the previous two times that he has used the word "dead" in this epistle are all in physical sense, ↙