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I am a web developer.


Sep
8
comment How do the traditions of the LXX and MT versions of Jeremiah relate?
@Mike Because they came to the prophet piecemeal. Look at the oracles - they have dates. Jeremiah wasn't written in one night. And likely Jeremiah didn't wait until he was finished with his career as a prophet before writing anything down (or having Baruch write anything down). His prophecies about the exile were timely and the people needed to hear them in his day. It would be the same thing with the Psalter. Who do you think organized that?
Sep
8
comment How do the traditions of the LXX and MT versions of Jeremiah relate?
Thanks for the information, Mike. I'm curious why you think that a better flow indicates that that text is older. Wouldn't it make sense for Jeremiah's prophecies to be first collected, and then later edited into a more coherent flow, with similar prophecies grouped together, etc... Don't editors generally improve a text?
Aug
23
comment Did John know about the Synoptics?
@user5197 There is no speech in John that matches up with Mark 13, Matthew 24, and Luke 21 (i.e. the Olivet Discourse). Instead, there is an emphasis that in some sense at least eternal life has already begun for those who believe (e.g. John 5:24f, 11:25-26). Hope that makes sense. I'm glad you found this answer helpful.
Aug
20
comment At what time did Jesus rise from the tomb?
@Simons Yes, of course. I started to mention that at the beginning but then forgot to include it later. None of four canonical gospels describe the resurrection event itself as the Gospel of Peter does. I think there is evidence that resurrection is linked in early Christian thought with dawn, though. Off the top of my head, I think of Romans 13 and 1 Thes. 5. When I have time I will try to edit this in as well. Thanks for your remark.
Aug
15
comment Should 1 Kings 19:3 read that Elijah “saw” or “was afraid”?
Thanks bjorne. I'm curious about your comment in the last paragraph, though. How could the original author have intended it be read both ways?
Aug
15
comment Should 1 Kings 19:3 read that Elijah “saw” or “was afraid”?
@MonicaCellio I do think Elijah left in order to avoid dying at Jezebel's hands lest she (and her god) be judged the victor. You're probably right that it weakens argument #1 regarding the narrative a little; but I don't think it's fatal to the overall case.
Aug
8
comment Why does Luke associate the birth of Christ with the census conducted by Quirinus?
Welcome to BH.SE. Could you clarify your answer a bit more? Are you saying that Luke was essentially name dropping to build rapport with the Roman?
Jul
24
comment Angels of God in Luke 12:8
I've edited the question in an attempt to get at what I think you're asking. If this doesn't reflect what you really are interested in, feel free to revert.
Jul
17
comment What is the origin of the household tables?
Yes, but it's not just the pairing up of actors, it's the serial pairing up of actors as well.
Jul
17
comment What is the origin of the household tables?
@MonicaCellio Does my latest edit clarify the difference?
Jul
17
comment What is the origin of the household tables?
I don't necessarily disagree with what you've written. It just doesn't address my question. However, I have created a new question where I think much of your content here would be more appropriate.
Jul
15
comment What is the origin of the household tables?
I appreciate the work you put into your answer; but unfortunately it doesn't really address what I'm asking. I'm interested in the common structure that the house tables share and whether there are parallels in the contemporary literature or whether the structure is something that was new.
Jul
14
comment What is the origin of the household tables?
@rhetorician I think the name goes back to Luther who used the term haustafel.
Jul
7
comment In 2 Peter 1:20-21, is Peter referring to all Scripture, or is he referring more specifically to the prophecies that are recorded in Scripture?
@Jas3.1 Yes. I do think Peter considered Moses and the Psalms as part of the "prophetic message"; but the concern in 2 Peter isn't to identify types of Scripture, but to identify types of prophecy (those that are credible because they have their origin in God, and those that are not credible because they do not).
Jun
24
comment How can we ensure a given “chiasm” was intentional by the author, and is not merely fanciful eisegesis?
Also, how do you regard seemingly over-arching chiasms like Luke-Acts where the narrative has a direction, even if the pieces do not correspond 1:1 with each other. In Luke everything heads towards Jerusalem. In Acts everything heads away. Is that not chiastic?
Jun
24
comment How can we ensure a given “chiasm” was intentional by the author, and is not merely fanciful eisegesis?
I'm curious how you apply this to the Genesis passage in your question above. There is a strong pattern in chapter 3 of serpent -> woman -> man : man -> woman -> serpent : serpent -> woman -> man. Are elements of that properly called a chiasm?
Jun
13
comment Does John 21:20-24 indicate that the original author of the Fourth Gospel was dead?
I ended up creating a question for the bigger question, in case you want to move some of your content here over there.
Jun
13
comment Does John 21:20-24 indicate that the original author of the Fourth Gospel was dead?
I think I'm understanding now, but it feels like a thin reed, so maybe I don't have it right still. Basically you think there's a literary correspondence that exists only if 1-20 and 21 are viewed separately and the best opportunity for that is a two stage composition/"publication"?
Jun
12
comment Does John 21:20-24 indicate that the original author of the Fourth Gospel was dead?
Thanks Matthew. The parallels with Ecclesiastes are interesting. Could you clarify why the pattern of the three "love" questions is more fitting of a later addition?
Jun
7
comment Locations of the graves of the Patriarchs
@BruceJames That he clearly understands his own culture and their manners of speaking much better than us? I think it says far more about us and our blind spots in interpretation if we consider something an obvious error that was no error at all.